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Saul Halpert

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1996 | KATE FOLMAR
Television viewers, radio listeners and newspaper readers deserve more than a list of murders, fires and bank heists, according to veteran journalist and media consultant Saul Halpert, who will speak at Thursday's breakfast meeting of the Valley Jewish Business Leaders Assn. At the breakfast, Halpert, 73, will explore whether the mass media provide the public with adequate and useful information.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2009
Re "The Mighty '39ers" by Susan King, May 6: Listing those movies released in 1939 makes me wonder whatever happened to the movie industry. How could we have gone from those stellar films ("Gone With the Wind," "The Wizard of Oz," "Stagecoach," etc.) to the "destroy/kill/maim/kill again" kind of movies I see advertised now? Yes, I am old enough to have seen each of these movies. How I long for these kinds of movies again. Carol Marshall Anaheim :: Re "Claws and All" by Kenneth Turan, April 30: What has happened to American culture when a leading and respected movie critic of the L.A. Times can wax rhapsodic over an alleged motion picture ("X-Men Origins")
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1990
How many Californians who voted for Prop. 140 really knew that the measure's author, Schabarum, personified everything he presumed to be against? He wrote: "Incumbent special-interest ties, partisan extremism, gerrymandered districts, vote-selling scandals, the pampered lifestyles of legislators, stockpiling of campaign funds, perpetual reelection of incumbents, a Legislature out of step with public opinion--Sacramento's ills are all-too-common knowledge." Change "Legislature" to "Board of Supervisors" and "Sacramento" to "Los Angeles" and--with the exception of vote-selling--Schabarum unwittingly painted an uncannily accurate portrait of Pete Schabarum.
OPINION
February 27, 2002
Re "Afghans Selling All They Can Sell," Feb. 25: The global crusade against terrorism launched with such flag-waving fervor after Sept. 11 has bogged down in the Afghan quagmire, as critics of the war policy hesitantly predicted at the time. Now what? Build an Afghan national army of 25,000 to 75,000 troops out of the ragtag soldiers and their rival warlords who switch sides for the cost of a U.S. government-issue sleeping bag or a set of camouflage fatigues in plentiful supply at the bazaar in Mazar-i-Sharif?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1989
Your story on the glut of recycled paper reflects one of the most stupid, thoughtless aspects of our wasteful society (Part I, Feb. 19). If there really is too much used newsprint, why don't we stop chopping down the forests and use more of the recycled paper in the newsprint mix? Admittedly, if newsprint were to be made 100% of recycled paper, eventually the quality would deteriorate to the point of diminishing return. But surely there ought to be a happy medium. What your story described is not unusual, though, when more and more of what we produce is made to be thrown away, including people.
MAGAZINE
October 11, 1992
The best thing about Raban's article is that it was way too long (let me brachiate here: Both the Clinton and Bush acceptance speeches at their respective nominating conventions were also way too long), guaranteeing that many readers would tire of Raban's linguistic hatchet job and put it down before finishing it. Surely in the interests of enabling your readers to make an informed choice when they go to the polls in November you are planning to offer us a similar analysis by Raban of the other major candidate in the presidential race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1992
The weird witches-and-goblins blitzkrieg launched by Perot is truly frightening because it threatens to steal next week's presidential election--not from George Bush or Bill Clinton but from the American people. While the pundits argue whether Bush or Clinton will gain or lose the most from the effect of Perot's unsubstantiated charges of dirty tricks plotted against his daughter, the fact is that nobody knows. It's possible that the millions of Americans who flocked to the call of the billionaire Pied Piper from Texas in the first place will now be convinced even more than ever that he is their true savior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1991
Let's be honest and face it: A major obstacle to reforming the LAPD is the silent streak of racism that still runs deep throughout American society. Too many people in Los Angeles are infected by this virus. It's not just some LAPD officers. The changes urgently recommended by the Christopher Commission will not be implemented without the solid support of residents in every community of this increasingly complex city. That includes the San Fernando Valley ZIP codes where most of the letters backing Gates were mailed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2009
Re "The Mighty '39ers" by Susan King, May 6: Listing those movies released in 1939 makes me wonder whatever happened to the movie industry. How could we have gone from those stellar films ("Gone With the Wind," "The Wizard of Oz," "Stagecoach," etc.) to the "destroy/kill/maim/kill again" kind of movies I see advertised now? Yes, I am old enough to have seen each of these movies. How I long for these kinds of movies again. Carol Marshall Anaheim :: Re "Claws and All" by Kenneth Turan, April 30: What has happened to American culture when a leading and respected movie critic of the L.A. Times can wax rhapsodic over an alleged motion picture ("X-Men Origins")
OPINION
February 27, 2002
Re "Afghans Selling All They Can Sell," Feb. 25: The global crusade against terrorism launched with such flag-waving fervor after Sept. 11 has bogged down in the Afghan quagmire, as critics of the war policy hesitantly predicted at the time. Now what? Build an Afghan national army of 25,000 to 75,000 troops out of the ragtag soldiers and their rival warlords who switch sides for the cost of a U.S. government-issue sleeping bag or a set of camouflage fatigues in plentiful supply at the bazaar in Mazar-i-Sharif?
NEWS
November 22, 2001
I respectfully suggest that the talk by First Lady Laura Bush ("Laura Bush Addresses State of Afghan Women," Nov. 18) may not have been the first solo radio broadcast ever given by a presidential wife. Several years ago my wife and I visited the Smithsonian in Washington to see the then-acclaimed exhibit on American women. At one booth we listened to a recording of a radio address given to the nation by Eleanor Roosevelt on the evening of Dec. 7, 1941. This talk was separate and apart from FDR's historic "date which will live in infamy" speech when he called on Congress to declare war on the Berlin-Tokyo Axis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2001
Shame on you, Bobbi Fiedler, for not keeping silent if all you could do was bad-mouth former City Council member and veteran Congressman James C. Corman after he died (Obituaries, Jan. 3). I hate to even repeat the words you used to dismiss Corman's record of public service by calling him "a very far left-wing liberal . . . [and] a very skilled politician in those areas that he cared about: basically, increasing taxes to support welfare programs." Is that really all Corman meant to you?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2000
Your front-page picture (Sept. 2) shows the Democratic and Republican leaders of the state Assembly hilariously congratulating each other at the close of this year's legislative session in Sacramento. What was so funny? In the annual mad rush of last-minute business, our public servants managed to lose in the frenzied shuffle of closing day a bill to expand a health care program for 600,000 poor, working parents while approving millions in spending bills that most members probably never read.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1996 | KATE FOLMAR
Television viewers, radio listeners and newspaper readers deserve more than a list of murders, fires and bank heists, according to veteran journalist and media consultant Saul Halpert, who will speak at Thursday's breakfast meeting of the Valley Jewish Business Leaders Assn. At the breakfast, Halpert, 73, will explore whether the mass media provide the public with adequate and useful information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1995
Those devious Democrats were at it again, emptying their bag of parliamentary dirty tricks to harass Rep. Howard (Buck) McKeon (R-Santa Clarita) every step of the way as he tried to chair one of his first committee meetings in the House of Representatives. So said a Page 1 Metro story in The Times (May 21). For two paragraphs the story described how those bad Democrats sandbagged poor ol' Buck, ending with the pregnant phrase: "Point of order!" a Democrat shouts . . . . . . then urging the reader to turn to page B3 for two more paragraphs of the Democrats' evil deeds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1992
The weird witches-and-goblins blitzkrieg launched by Perot is truly frightening because it threatens to steal next week's presidential election--not from George Bush or Bill Clinton but from the American people. While the pundits argue whether Bush or Clinton will gain or lose the most from the effect of Perot's unsubstantiated charges of dirty tricks plotted against his daughter, the fact is that nobody knows. It's possible that the millions of Americans who flocked to the call of the billionaire Pied Piper from Texas in the first place will now be convinced even more than ever that he is their true savior.
NEWS
November 22, 2001
I respectfully suggest that the talk by First Lady Laura Bush ("Laura Bush Addresses State of Afghan Women," Nov. 18) may not have been the first solo radio broadcast ever given by a presidential wife. Several years ago my wife and I visited the Smithsonian in Washington to see the then-acclaimed exhibit on American women. At one booth we listened to a recording of a radio address given to the nation by Eleanor Roosevelt on the evening of Dec. 7, 1941. This talk was separate and apart from FDR's historic "date which will live in infamy" speech when he called on Congress to declare war on the Berlin-Tokyo Axis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1995
Those devious Democrats were at it again, emptying their bag of parliamentary dirty tricks to harass Rep. Howard (Buck) McKeon (R-Santa Clarita) every step of the way as he tried to chair one of his first committee meetings in the House of Representatives. So said a Page 1 Metro story in The Times (May 21). For two paragraphs the story described how those bad Democrats sandbagged poor ol' Buck, ending with the pregnant phrase: "Point of order!" a Democrat shouts . . . . . . then urging the reader to turn to page B3 for two more paragraphs of the Democrats' evil deeds.
MAGAZINE
October 11, 1992
The best thing about Raban's article is that it was way too long (let me brachiate here: Both the Clinton and Bush acceptance speeches at their respective nominating conventions were also way too long), guaranteeing that many readers would tire of Raban's linguistic hatchet job and put it down before finishing it. Surely in the interests of enabling your readers to make an informed choice when they go to the polls in November you are planning to offer us a similar analysis by Raban of the other major candidate in the presidential race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1991
Let's be honest and face it: A major obstacle to reforming the LAPD is the silent streak of racism that still runs deep throughout American society. Too many people in Los Angeles are infected by this virus. It's not just some LAPD officers. The changes urgently recommended by the Christopher Commission will not be implemented without the solid support of residents in every community of this increasingly complex city. That includes the San Fernando Valley ZIP codes where most of the letters backing Gates were mailed.
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