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Saul Levine

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March 28, 2007 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
For at least the next decade, KKJZ-FM (88.1) out of Cal State Long Beach will remain an outlet for mainstream jazz and blues, according to a new programming contract announced Tuesday. The university, which owns the station, will hand over programming duties on April 21 to Global Jazz Inc., owned by radio entrepreneur Saul Levine, who also owns country music station KKGO-FM (105.1) and classical KMZT-AM (1260).
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2007 | Steve Carney, Special to The Times
For at least the next decade, KKJZ-FM (88.1) out of Cal State Long Beach will remain an outlet for mainstream jazz and blues, according to a new programming contract announced Tuesday. The university, which owns the station, will hand over programming duties on April 21 to Global Jazz Inc., owned by radio entrepreneur Saul Levine, who also owns country music station KKGO-FM (105.1) and classical KMZT-AM (1260).
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2002 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Saul Levine is willing to try just about anything--except retirement. The 70-year-old station owner has brought Southern California the all-traffic format and the all-Beatles format. He tried to challenge the news-radio duopoly of KNX and KFWB. He ran the nation's only commercial jazz station, until March, when he changed it to contemporary standards--bringing Sinatra and Tony Bennett back to the Southland airwaves and adding modern vocalists such as Harry Connick Jr. and Diana Krall.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2007 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Classical music radio does not lack for dead white males, but KUSC-FM (91.5) has added a couple of live ones with the signing of DJs Rich Capparela and Dennis Bartel, two blasts from its past whom it's counting on to help it exploit a rival's shrunken profile on the airwaves. Capparela was the morning announcer at L.A. commercial classical station KMZT-FM (105.1) from 1996 until Feb.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2006
Regarding "Classical Station Owner Sticks to Playing Solo," on Saul Levine and KMZT-FM (July 19): For more than 50 years of living in L.A., essentially the only radio stations I have listened to are classical. But there have been so few choices in classical that in 1960, when I purchased a new auto, I insisted on a non-push-button radio because I tuned in only to KFAC-FM (92.3). Now I have two choices: KUSC-FM (91.5) and K-Mozart (105.1). The only buttons on my radios (car and home)
BUSINESS
October 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
KGIL-AM Sold to Owner of KKGO-FM: San Fernando Valley-based radio station KGIL-AM (1260) has been sold to Saul Levine, owner of classical music station KKGO-FM, for just under the asking price of $5 million, KGIL General Manager Tom Mosher said. KGIL's news-talk format will likely switch to a "nostalgia" music format after the first of the year, Mosher said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1998
We appreciate hearing from listeners who enjoyed KGIL's show tunes format, including Valerie Speaks (Letters, March 15). The show tunes have been combined with American standards as a format. The show-tune segments on KGIL-AM (1260/1650) are now scheduled Mondays through Fridays between 7 and 9 a.m. and 5 and 9 p.m., and all day Sundays between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. KGIL still provides more show tunes than any other radio station in America. SAUL LEVINE KGIL General Manager Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2002
Thank you so much for the excellent article on Saul Levine and radio station KMZT-FM ("A Maverick Goes Against the Tide Again," by Steve Carney, May 17). Almost my entire knowledge of classical music has been learned from listening to his excellent station. I am so grateful for the hours of pleasure I've had listening to KMZT at home and in my car. Now I find Levine's profits are "extremely modest." So, more than ever in this day of company owners caring only about profits, my heartfelt thanks to Levine and his wife, Anita.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1990
Thanks for Greg Braxton's "Classics Jazz KKGO-FM Ratings" (May 12). It is heartening to see printed confirmation of what we knew: that classical music does have a large base in Greater Los Angeles and that one key man--Saul Levine--had the discernment to perceive that and the courage to act on it. We have been buffeted a lot in the last three years, having seen our sources turn fickle and then one unnecessarily die. The brief resurrection from...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2007 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Classical music radio does not lack for dead white males, but KUSC-FM (91.5) has added a couple of live ones with the signing of DJs Rich Capparela and Dennis Bartel, two blasts from its past whom it's counting on to help it exploit a rival's shrunken profile on the airwaves. Capparela was the morning announcer at L.A. commercial classical station KMZT-FM (105.1) from 1996 until Feb.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2006
Regarding "Classical Station Owner Sticks to Playing Solo," on Saul Levine and KMZT-FM (July 19): For more than 50 years of living in L.A., essentially the only radio stations I have listened to are classical. But there have been so few choices in classical that in 1960, when I purchased a new auto, I insisted on a non-push-button radio because I tuned in only to KFAC-FM (92.3). Now I have two choices: KUSC-FM (91.5) and K-Mozart (105.1). The only buttons on my radios (car and home)
BUSINESS
July 19, 2006 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
In 1958, atop Mt. Wilson overlooking Los Angeles, Saul Levine built a radio station almost solely with his own hands. He used a rented tractor to clear scrub brush from a patch of land so remote that the U.S. Forest Service leased it to him for $350 a year. With the help of a carpenter, he built a shack to house his broadcast equipment -- mostly secondhand -- and a bare-bones studio. The antenna was placed atop a flagpole.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2002
Thank you so much for the excellent article on Saul Levine and radio station KMZT-FM ("A Maverick Goes Against the Tide Again," by Steve Carney, May 17). Almost my entire knowledge of classical music has been learned from listening to his excellent station. I am so grateful for the hours of pleasure I've had listening to KMZT at home and in my car. Now I find Levine's profits are "extremely modest." So, more than ever in this day of company owners caring only about profits, my heartfelt thanks to Levine and his wife, Anita.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2002 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Saul Levine is willing to try just about anything--except retirement. The 70-year-old station owner has brought Southern California the all-traffic format and the all-Beatles format. He tried to challenge the news-radio duopoly of KNX and KFWB. He ran the nation's only commercial jazz station, until March, when he changed it to contemporary standards--bringing Sinatra and Tony Bennett back to the Southland airwaves and adding modern vocalists such as Harry Connick Jr. and Diana Krall.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1998
We appreciate hearing from listeners who enjoyed KGIL's show tunes format, including Valerie Speaks (Letters, March 15). The show tunes have been combined with American standards as a format. The show-tune segments on KGIL-AM (1260/1650) are now scheduled Mondays through Fridays between 7 and 9 a.m. and 5 and 9 p.m., and all day Sundays between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. KGIL still provides more show tunes than any other radio station in America. SAUL LEVINE KGIL General Manager Los Angeles
BUSINESS
October 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
KGIL-AM Sold to Owner of KKGO-FM: San Fernando Valley-based radio station KGIL-AM (1260) has been sold to Saul Levine, owner of classical music station KKGO-FM, for just under the asking price of $5 million, KGIL General Manager Tom Mosher said. KGIL's news-talk format will likely switch to a "nostalgia" music format after the first of the year, Mosher said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saul Levine is feeling real jazzed these days--even though jazz has nothing to do with it. Levine, the general manager and president of KKGO-FM (105.1), appears to have turned the fortunes of his radio station around--with a little help from Bach, Beethoven and Mozart. The fact that he angered a devoted audience in the process is of little consequence to him now.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1990
Thanks for Greg Braxton's "Classics Jazz KKGO-FM Ratings" (May 12). It is heartening to see printed confirmation of what we knew: that classical music does have a large base in Greater Los Angeles and that one key man--Saul Levine--had the discernment to perceive that and the courage to act on it. We have been buffeted a lot in the last three years, having seen our sources turn fickle and then one unnecessarily die. The brief resurrection from...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saul Levine is feeling real jazzed these days--even though jazz has nothing to do with it. Levine, the general manager and president of KKGO-FM (105.1), appears to have turned the fortunes of his radio station around--with a little help from Bach, Beethoven and Mozart. The fact that he angered a devoted audience in the process is of little consequence to him now.
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