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Saul Menem

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NEWS
February 27, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
The resurgent Peronist party, seeing the presidency within its grasp, has endorsed a moderate campaign platform, abandoning the party's long-held conviction that the state should dominate the national economy. Flamboyant Peronist candidate Carlos Saul Menem spoke in a weekend interview with the restraint and confidence of a front runner who is convinced that he needs merely to avoid major gaffes to win the May 14 election.
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NEWS
July 16, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They make an odd couple, Carlos and George. Argentine President Carlos Saul Menem: shortish, dapper and flamboyant, a provincial populist. President George Bush: nearly a head taller, conventional, a pillar of the Establishment. And yet the two have a "very loyal, very sincere friendship," Menem remarked when Bush visited Argentina in December. Loyal and sincere as it may be, the friendship also fits into Menem's policy of cultivating close relations between Argentina and the United States for pragmatic reasons.
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BUSINESS
November 29, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a man who was not even supposed to take office for another few weeks, President Carlos Saul Menem sometimes has the look of a haggard victim of Argentina's "me-first" political and economic wars. The trade union movement that helped put him in office is squabbling; big business is howling over lost subsidies and higher taxes; the black-market dollar has shot up, and rumors of impending Cabinet changes are denied daily--all of this little more than four months into Menem's six-year term.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With plenty of false starts, backpedaling and detours, Argentina is lurching into the brave new world of free-market economies. For most analysts, it is an open question whether the train to modernization will derail even before it builds up steam. The final days of December and the first weeks of the 1990s saw a ruthless new spurt of inflation, chewing up workers' buying power just as it began recovering from last year's hyper-inflation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1989 | JORGE CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda is a graduate professor of political science at the National University of Mexico in Mexico City. He is in South America as part of a lengthy regional study. and
After barely five months as president, Carlos Saul Menem has run into Argentina's traditional unmovable obstacle: the sheer intractability of the nation's problems. Menem's ambitious economic program, highly touted abroad but deeply controversial in Argentina, is in trouble. Worse still, political signals from the Argentine electorate are far from comforting. As soon as he moved into the presidential palace, Menem broke with many canons of his Peronist legacy.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With plenty of false starts, backpedaling and detours, Argentina is lurching into the brave new world of free-market economies. For most analysts, it is an open question whether the train to modernization will derail even before it builds up steam. The final days of December and the first weeks of the 1990s saw a ruthless new spurt of inflation, chewing up workers' buying power just as it began recovering from last year's hyper-inflation.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They make an odd couple, Carlos and George. Argentine President Carlos Saul Menem: shortish, dapper and flamboyant, a provincial populist. President George Bush: nearly a head taller, conventional, a pillar of the Establishment. And yet the two have a "very loyal, very sincere friendship," Menem remarked when Bush visited Argentina in December. Loyal and sincere as it may be, the friendship also fits into Menem's policy of cultivating close relations between Argentina and the United States for pragmatic reasons.
NEWS
May 14, 1993 | Associated Press
President Carlos Saul Menem of Argentina will visit the White House on June 29 to discuss trade and economic matters with President Clinton, the Administration said Thursday.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | Associated Press
President Carlos Saul Menem of Argentina will make a state visit to Washington and meet with President Bush on Nov. 14, it was announced here.
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | Reuters
Sen. Eduardo Menem, brother of Argentine President Carlos Saul Menem, has become the effective leader of the ruling Justicialist (Peronist) Party after becoming its vice president Friday night, party sources said Saturday. Although Carlos Saul Menem was chosen party president by the national council, he accepted the position in name only, saying he cannot take a leading role in internal party affairs while being president of the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1989 | JORGE CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda is a graduate professor of political science at the National University of Mexico in Mexico City. He is in South America as part of a lengthy regional study. and
After barely five months as president, Carlos Saul Menem has run into Argentina's traditional unmovable obstacle: the sheer intractability of the nation's problems. Menem's ambitious economic program, highly touted abroad but deeply controversial in Argentina, is in trouble. Worse still, political signals from the Argentine electorate are far from comforting. As soon as he moved into the presidential palace, Menem broke with many canons of his Peronist legacy.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a man who was not even supposed to take office for another few weeks, President Carlos Saul Menem sometimes has the look of a haggard victim of Argentina's "me-first" political and economic wars. The trade union movement that helped put him in office is squabbling; big business is howling over lost subsidies and higher taxes; the black-market dollar has shot up, and rumors of impending Cabinet changes are denied daily--all of this little more than four months into Menem's six-year term.
NEWS
February 27, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
The resurgent Peronist party, seeing the presidency within its grasp, has endorsed a moderate campaign platform, abandoning the party's long-held conviction that the state should dominate the national economy. Flamboyant Peronist candidate Carlos Saul Menem spoke in a weekend interview with the restraint and confidence of a front runner who is convinced that he needs merely to avoid major gaffes to win the May 14 election.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Zulema Menem, estranged wife of Argentine President Carlos Saul Menem, moved out of the presidential estate in suburban Buenos Aires rather than face eviction. By law, the president has the sole right to say who may live there.
NEWS
July 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The sister-in-law and former aide of Argentine President Carlos Saul Menem fled her home shortly after a judge said she would be indicted in a drug money-laundering case, police said. Amira Yoma, 37, was seen leaving her Buenos Aires apartment with several relatives, sources said.
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