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Saul Rubinek

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NEWS
April 25, 1993 | SUSAN KING, Times Staff Writer
In 1986, Canadian actor Saul Rubinek ("Unforgiven," "Bonfire of the Vanities") accompanied his parents, Israel and Frania, back to their native Poland. Before World War II, the Jewish couple had operated a small store in the village of Pinczow. But in 1942 the Germans started rounding up and deporting Jews from the village and sending them to concentration camps.
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NEWS
April 25, 1993 | SUSAN KING, Times Staff Writer
In 1986, Canadian actor Saul Rubinek ("Unforgiven," "Bonfire of the Vanities") accompanied his parents, Israel and Frania, back to their native Poland. Before World War II, the Jewish couple had operated a small store in the village of Pinczow. But in 1942 the Germans started rounding up and deporting Jews from the village and sending them to concentration camps.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
"The Bonfire of the Vanities," a Warner Bros. drama based on Tom Wolfe's best-selling novel, completed principal photography in Hollywood after 16 weeks of production. Produced and directed by Brian De Palma, "The Bonfire of the Vanities" stars Tom Hanks, Bruce Willis, Melanie Griffith and Morgan Freeman. The supporting cast includes F. Murray Abraham, Kim Cattrall, Saul Rubinek and John Hancock.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1989
Times critic Sheila Benson has every right to say that the movie "The Outside Chance of Maximilian Glick" may not live up to whatever standards she sets, but she is wrong in saying that it has vanished from sight since winning the Best Canadian Film Award over "Dead Ringers" at the 1988 Toronto Film Festival. "Max Glick" went on to win the most popular film award at the Vancouver Film Festival and the Innovation in Feature Filmmaking Award at the Montreal Film Festival and to considerable audience response at the Jerusalem Film Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2008 | From the Associated Press
BERLIN -- New films from Isabel Coixet, Mike Leigh and Johnnie To will compete for the top Golden Bear award at the annual Berlin Film Festival next month, organizers said. Among nine new entries for the festival's main competition are Coixet's "Elegy," based on Philip Roth's novel "The Dying Animal." The movie stars Penelope Cruz, Ben Kingsley, Dennis Hopper and Patricia Clarkson.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2010 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As funny as an ax to the head, the Canadian comedy "The Trotsky" rolls through its brash, too-clever take on high school outsiderdom — a 17-year-old Montrealite (Jay Baruchel) who believes he's the reincarnation of Leon Trotsky — with a revolutionary's exasperating confidence. In bespectacled, history-emboldened Leon Bronstein's organizing against his capitalist father (Saul Rubinek), aggressively courting an Alexandra (Emily Hampshire) he claims will be his future wife, and leading the charge against fascism at his school, writer-director Jacob Tierney believes he's found the ultimate nerd antihero: a socialist networker.
NEWS
January 22, 1995 | Kenneth Turan
Simultaneously heroic and nihilistic, Clint Eastwood's masterly 1992 Oscar winner (best picture) is a Western for those who cherish the form. The story of a reformed killer who confronts his past, "Unforgiven" is definitely as elegant in its own way as "The Wild Bunch" and "Ride the High Country." It's also a neat piece of revisionism, a violent film that is determined to demythologize killing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1999 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the telltale title indicates, time is of the essence in "36 Hours to Die," a slick and satisfying thriller premiering Sunday on TNT. Treat Williams is a vulnerable protagonist as Noah Stone, a brewery owner who suffers a heart attack minutes into the film. Two months later, Noah must grapple with a tricky ticker and the future of his family when a crafty embezzler (Saul Rubinek) unveils a multimillion-dollar scheme to crush his company.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1986 | LEE MARGULIES, Times Staff Writer
Four high school friends, now in their mid-30s, gather for their regular poker game. No wives or children on the premises. Time to kick back, drink a little beer and be themselves: to gripe and swear, boast and taunt, laugh and perhaps share a few fading dreams. Male camaraderie. Commercial television has a difficult time showing it honestly. But the restrictions on language and subject matter don't apply to cable, so Home Box Office is able to present a rippingly good look at it this weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Family Man" is an ambitious, carefully crafted Christmas movie that tries to be "It's a Wonderful Life" for the new millennium but lacks the honesty to pull it off. Not even a sincere and heroic effort by Nicolas Cage can redeem the film's essential phoniness. Still, Cage's charisma and a lot of shameless heart-tugging will surely prove a potent lure with many moviegoers.
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