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Saul Turteltaub

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1997 | Steve Schmidt, Steve Schmidt is a writer based in Westwood
Ageism strikes fear into everyone who knows they'll soon be getting up there, if they haven't already arrived--particularly in the entertainment business, where dynamism and young ideas often appeal over hard-won sagacity. A 17-year-old was recently plucked out of a Santa Monica high school for a development deal with New Line Cinema, sending chills up the spines of writers who remember going to movies when they were rated M. For baby boomers and beyond, there's a recent tide of good news.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1997 | Steve Schmidt, Steve Schmidt is a writer based in Westwood
Ageism strikes fear into everyone who knows they'll soon be getting up there, if they haven't already arrived--particularly in the entertainment business, where dynamism and young ideas often appeal over hard-won sagacity. A 17-year-old was recently plucked out of a Santa Monica high school for a development deal with New Line Cinema, sending chills up the spines of writers who remember going to movies when they were rated M. For baby boomers and beyond, there's a recent tide of good news.
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SPORTS
October 21, 2006
I enjoyed Jerry Crowe's article about Saul Turteltaub's quest for the ticket buyer he inadvertently wronged [Oct. 16]. When I first moved to L.A. from Brooklyn in 1990, I was a production assistant on "Designing Women" and worked a few offices away from Mr. Turteltaub. As a lifelong sitcom junkie, I considered him to be TV royalty, and was delighted to find out he was a truly sweet man. DARA MONAHAN Studio City
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1989 | DANIEL CERONE, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
ABC briefly considered putting its "Chicken Soup" star Jackie Mason on its "PrimeTime Live" news program Thursday night to discuss his controversial comments regarding the mayoral race in New York, but ultimately rejected the idea, network officials said. Mason, whose comedy centers on Jewish themes, was roundly criticized by Jewish organizations and other groups after he was quoted in the Village Voice saying that mayoral candidate David N.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1991
Regarding Saul Turteltaub's letter (Saturday Letters, Calendar, June 29): For 25 years I have been a subscription patron of Ahmanson Theatre productions. For the last two years I have been obliged to endure being shunted to center orchestra row H seats in the dreary UCLA James A. Doolittle Theater. Row spacing makes it necessary to swing one's legs into the adjacent seat space. Poor seat arrangement places a seat directly in front of me, and even at 6 feet 2 I find center stage view blocked.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1991
In the name of fairness, I suggest that future reviews of theatrical performances include the location of the seat from which the critic saw the performance. I challenge you to go to the UCLA James A. Doolittle Theater, sit in the mezzanine section, Row B, and honestly write that you spent five totally enjoyable minutes during the production of "A Little Night Music" or anything else. The spacing between rows is so narrow that it takes an unspoken agreement from the persons sitting to your left and right, and their left and right and so on down the row, to shift knees simultaneously.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1995 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Christmas-themed TV shows abound at this time of year, but Hanukkah specials are few and far between. Tune in PBS Sunday, however, and you'll find "Lamb Chop's Special Chanukah," starring longtime children's entertainer Shari Lewis and her puppet pals Lamb Chop, Charlie Horse and Hush Puppy. You don't have to be Jewish to enjoy this bubbly mix of nonsense and celebration. If you don't know what Hanukkah is all about, Lewis and friends will clue you in.
NEWS
March 23, 1999 | HEATHER STEWART JORDEN
Melissa Manchester was among the 200 or so people who attended SHARE's annual reception for 37 Los Angeles-based children's charities Feb. 24 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's Harvey Morse Auditorium. SHARE, which stands for Share Happily and Reap Endlessly, distributed more than $1 million to the charities, raised during the year. Actress Susan Dey, actor Tom Bosley, TV producer Saul Turteltaub composer Hans Zimmer and producer Freddie Fields were also at the event.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1997 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
Its lead actors are about as Italian as steak and kidney pie--in Bearnaise sauce, with a side of slaw. But "For Roseanna" has its charms, which do not include that cloying title but do include a cast that makes what might have been a trifle into a whimsical, bittersweet romance. And by romance, we don't necessarily mean straining bustiers and perspiring peasants (although British actress Polly Walker is dutifully distracting).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1997 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
Its lead actors are about as Italian as steak and kidney pie--in Bearnaise sauce, with a side of slaw. But "For Roseanna" has its charms, which do not include that cloying title but do include a cast that makes what might have been a trifle into a whimsical, bittersweet romance. And by romance, we don't necessarily mean straining bustiers and perspiring peasants (although British actress Polly Walker is dutifully distracting).
SPORTS
October 16, 2006 | Jerry Crowe, Times Staff Writer
Saul Turteltaub knows it was an innocent mistake, knows that his heart was in the right place, knows that he meant no harm. So why does he feel so lousy? Why is he "inconsolable," as he wrote in an e-mail to The Times? Because of the boy. Visions of the boy haunt him, remind him of his grandsons. He'd like to make this right. He'd like the kid to know that Saul Turteltaub is not a cheat.
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