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Savannah River Nuclear Power Plant

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NEWS
October 1, 1988 | Associated Press
The Savannah River Plant in South Carolina, a large federal complex that produces fuel for the nation's nuclear weapons, has experienced numerous reactor accidents that have been kept secret for as long as 31 years, two congressional committees disclosed Friday.
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BUSINESS
May 14, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A business consortium that was negotiating to acquire the nuclear division of Westinghouse Electric Corp. has come undone, leaving Irvine-based Fluor Corp.'s future role in the process uncertain. Fluor was a member of the consortium, one of two groups that had been in negotiations to acquire the Westinghouse unit that operates the Savannah River Site nuclear weapons plant in South Carolina.
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NEWS
April 29, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Energy Secretary James D. Watkins told a House Armed Services subcommittee that in the next few weeks he expects to approve restarting the K nuclear reactor at Savannah River, Ga. The 37-year-old plant is the only remaining U.S. source of radioactive tritium, which is crucial to the hydrogen bomb. It was shut down in 1988 for modifications that cost nearly $1 billion.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Energy Secretary James D. Watkins told a House Armed Services subcommittee that in the next few weeks he expects to approve restarting the K nuclear reactor at Savannah River, Ga. The 37-year-old plant is the only remaining U.S. source of radioactive tritium, which is crucial to the hydrogen bomb. It was shut down in 1988 for modifications that cost nearly $1 billion.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two vital components of the nation's crippled nuclear weapons production complex will resume operating before the end of this year, Energy Secretary James D. Watkins told Congress Wednesday. The projected timetable, which Watkins admitted is "ambitious," aroused skepticism from some members of the House Armed Services defense nuclear subcommittee, who also expressed concern that the expedited schedule might give short shrift to safety concerns.
NEWS
December 30, 1988 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
The Energy Department is resisting pressure from the defense community to immediately restart its troubled weapons reactors at Savannah River as a signal that the United States will not allow its military preparedness to erode, according to Energy Secretary John S. Herrington.
NEWS
December 7, 1988 | From the Washington Post
The Energy Department announced Tuesday that national security concerns will require the restart of one of its nuclear-weapons reactors at the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina before long-term safety improvements have been completed. The government's three production reactors, all at Savannah River, have been shut down for nearly nine months because of concerns about their safety.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
An independent panel of safety experts advising the Energy Department declined Tuesday to endorse the agency's plan for restarting its nuclear weapons production reactors at the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina, saying that the detailed plan failed to explain adequately how a number of safety issues will be resolved.
NEWS
December 16, 1988 | From the Washington Post
Engineers have discovered new cracks in a cooling pipe in one of the government's nuclear weapons reactors in South Carolina, the most serious structural problem yet identified in the aging reactors, according to Reagan Administration officials and other sources. The cracks affect the main cooling system of the L-reactor, one of three reactors at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken.
NEWS
December 5, 1988
The Savannah River Plant, the nation's sole source of a critical nuclear weapons component, may not reopen until the end of 1989, months later than the Energy Department projected, it was reported. The later-than-projected restart is because of delays in implementing a department plan to overhaul training, safety, inspection, management and other operations at the plant, the New York Times reported.
NEWS
December 28, 1991 | From Associated Press
The leak of a small amount of radioactive coolant into the Savannah River this week has been termed harmless, but officials 90 miles downstream are concerned about plans to tap the river for drinking water. Coolant contaminated with the radioactive gas tritium leaked from the Savannah River Site's K Reactor near Aiken, S.C., sometime between Sunday and Wednesday. The government reactor is the country's only source of tritium, which is used in thermonuclear warheads.
NEWS
December 14, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly four years after it was shut down amid acute concern over its safety, a government nuclear reactor that makes vital material for thermonuclear warheads was given a much-debated clearance Friday to begin preparations to resume production. With a go-ahead from Energy Secretary James D. Watkins, Westinghouse Electric Corp.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of three tritium-producing nuclear reactors shut down in 1988 because of safety and environmental concerns will be restarted in December and should be producing nuclear weapons fuel by early 1991, Energy Secretary James D. Watkins told Congress on Tuesday. After the first reactor at the Savannah River plant in South Carolina is back in operation, tentative plans call for restarting the second next March and the third in the fall of 1991.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two vital components of the nation's crippled nuclear weapons production complex will resume operating before the end of this year, Energy Secretary James D. Watkins told Congress Wednesday. The projected timetable, which Watkins admitted is "ambitious," aroused skepticism from some members of the House Armed Services defense nuclear subcommittee, who also expressed concern that the expedited schedule might give short shrift to safety concerns.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | United Press International
Two maintenance workers were exposed to radioactive materials Wednesday when 20 gallons of heavy water escaped from a reactor pipe at the Savannah River nuclear weapons plant. A plant spokesman said protective suits limited the pair's exposure.
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
Engineers looking for cracks in the three idled reactors at the Savannah River nuclear weapons complex have given one of the units a clean bill of health, according to a report released Friday by the Energy Department. Tests on the two other reactors are scheduled for early next year as part of the department's effort to determine if the aging structures are sound enough to restart. They have been shut down for more than a year for safety reasons.
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Energy Department said Friday that a suspected flaw in a reactor tank at the Savannah River nuclear weapons plant turned out to be a harmless weld repair and will not affect plans to restart the idled reactor. Energy Secretary James D. Watkins said earlier this month that the first of the reactors would be restarted next summer.
NEWS
September 28, 1989
In a move that could further delay the production of a scarce gas needed for nuclear warheads, Energy Secretary James D. Watkins ordered additional testing of the government's tritium reactors before they are restarted. Watkins said all three tritium-producing reactors at the Savannah River plant near Aiken, S.C., would undergo ultrasonic testing for cracks. He provided no details.
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