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Save Our Youth Arts Education Organization

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1993 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early last year, with more good will than cash, a pair of actors decided to give troubled and at-risk youth a chance to find their voices--and their hearts--through a hands-on theater arts program that would reach out to the community. The Pasadena-based Save Our Youth Arts & Education organization's first show was "Graffiti Blues," a rap opera about the plight of inner-city youth. It was hosted by Dionne Warwick at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium in November.
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NEWS
June 15, 1996 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blanca Moreno's parents probably wouldn't have been able to afford the $30 cost of her graduation cap and gown. Money is so tight in her family of nine. But hard work and good grades have helped Moreno pay for all her school expenses: Next week, she will graduate from Estancia High School in Costa Mesa with a $2,600 check she earned by receiving high marks.
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NEWS
June 15, 1996 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blanca Moreno's parents probably wouldn't have been able to afford the $30 cost of her graduation cap and gown. Money is so tight in her family of nine. But hard work and good grades have helped Moreno pay for all her school expenses: Next week, she will graduate from Estancia High School in Costa Mesa with a $2,600 check she earned by receiving high marks.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1993 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early last year, with more good will than cash, a pair of actors decided to give troubled and at-risk youth a chance to find their voices--and their hearts--through a hands-on theater arts program that would reach out to the community. The Pasadena-based Save Our Youth Arts & Education organization's first show was "Graffiti Blues," a rap opera about the plight of inner-city youth. It was hosted by Dionne Warwick at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium in November.
MAGAZINE
April 18, 1993 | Wanda Coleman
Police officers came to my 14-year-old son's Los Feliz-area junior high recently to break up warfare between the KP and the LP. "KP is Korean Power!" he explains excitedly, hipping Mom and Dad to the dynamics of gang activity. "LP is Latin Power. AP is Armenian Power." We learn the difference between taggers (graffiti artists) and saggers (who wear their baggies low off the backbone). We listen quietly, fear motivating our questions. We want to know what's going on. For all our sakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1993 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children's music, country style: Seems as if everybody's doing it these days, even a certain eight-foot-high fowl with yellow feathers. Golden Music's "Sesame Country" album, to be released Friday, is the latest entry in the country for kids mode. It's a compilation of down-home tunes from past "Sesame Street" shows featuring familiar Muppet fuzzies and furries trading quips and chords with Crystal Gayle, Glen Campbell, Loretta Lynn and Tanya Tucker.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I don't care if a child wants to become a scientist or a policeman--every mother's child needs to be exposed to the arts one way or the other. The arts are a powerful instrument (to help) you learn about yourself, about individuality, how to speak, to project not just your voice, but feelings, to be able to communicate, reason, think . . . that is self-esteem." The impassioned speaker is actor Ron Mokwena, who has a recurring role on NBC's "A Different World."
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