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Savina Yannatou

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Savina YANNATOU unassumingly strolled on stage Sunday at UCLA's Schoenberg Hall, her slender figure garbed in a flowing red chiffon tunic. Her most notable attribute: an apparent reluctance to perform, almost shyness. She announced each song in a soft, gentle voice, sometimes simply providing a title and the number's country of origin. Occasionally, she recited an English translation of a song's lyrics. For the first few numbers, the Greek singer's low-key demeanor dominated the music as well.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Savina YANNATOU unassumingly strolled on stage Sunday at UCLA's Schoenberg Hall, her slender figure garbed in a flowing red chiffon tunic. Her most notable attribute: an apparent reluctance to perform, almost shyness. She announced each song in a soft, gentle voice, sometimes simply providing a title and the number's country of origin. Occasionally, she recited an English translation of a song's lyrics. For the first few numbers, the Greek singer's low-key demeanor dominated the music as well.
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OPINION
June 16, 2004
What a pleasant surprise to see "Israelis Hoping They Won't Hear the Last Word on Ancient Dialect" (June 13), on the long-neglected Sephardic-Ladino community. I was especially pleased that it mentioned singer Yasmin Levy. There are thousands of Sephardic Jews living in the Los Angeles area as well as many Sephardic organizations whose purpose it is to perpetuate those traditions, including the music. A few years ago, I was invited to be a guest on public radio station KCRW. For an hour we played only Sephardic recordings.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
World music doesn't get much more worldly than this: a festival in the southern Sahara, 50 miles northeast of Timbuktu. Reachable only by camel or four-wheel drive vehicle, just such a three-day event took place this year in an area that has seen generations of conflict between the nomadic and the sedentary communities of the Sahara. In the mid-'90s, the "Flame of Peace" program initiated a reconciliation between these various groups via a symbolic burning of weapons.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The Rough Guide to World Music wasn't kidding when its editors identified world music as "the other 80% of the music in the world." The 80%, in other words, that isn't pop, classical or American folk. Before the phrase came into common usage a decade or two ago, however, anyone interested in, say, Brazilian forro, Moroccan trance music or Pakistani qawwali pretty much had to scour the ethnic music bins -- often without much success.
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