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Saving Private Ryan Movie

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NEWS
August 6, 1998 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven Spielberg's new World War II movie, "Saving Private Ryan," has been almost universally lauded for painting an unusually realistic portrait of war. Moviegoers not only see what combat looks like, but they hear it as well, from the plink of gunfire on a soldier's helmet to the boom of mortar shells to the cries of the wounded.
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NATIONAL
November 12, 2004 | From Associated Press
A number of ABC affiliates announced Thursday that they would not take part in the network's Veterans Day airing of "Saving Private Ryan," saying the acclaimed film's violence and language could draw sanctions from the Federal Communications Commission. Stations replacing the movie with other programming Thursday included stations owned by Cox Television in Atlanta and Charlotte, N.C., and three Midwest stations owned by Citadel Communications.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1998 | JENNIFER NAPIER-PEARCE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven Spielberg's vivid "Saving Private Ryan," set during the Allied invasion of Europe in World War II, may leave moviegoers feeling the need for a history refresher course. While the plot of "Ryan," which raked in $30.6 million at the box office last weekend, centers on the fictional search for the last of four American soldier brothers still alive, the setting is fact, using D-day and the Allied invasion of Normandy, France, as its historical backdrop.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2001 | Geoff Boucher
THE ARTS New York's 'Singing Policeman' Signs Deal Daniel Rodriguez, New York's "Singing Policeman," is recording a lush version of "God Bless America," performances of which made him a familiar presence at New York Yankees playoff games and various memorial events in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. A single will be released Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Steven Spielberg's almost three-hour "Saving Private Ryan" capitalized on its popular star Tom Hanks and its resoundingly strong reviews to corral an impressive opening weekend of $30.1 million in 2,463 theaters, more than $12,000 a screen. The total far exceeded DreamWorks' expectations. The fledgling studio, which is releasing the film in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Saving Private Ryan," Steven Spielberg's harrowing World War II drama, was voted best picture of 1998 on Saturday by the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. The box office hit, which stars Tom Hanks, was the big winner--receiving three of the critics' awards. Spielberg won for best director and Janusz Kaminski was named for his cinematography.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2001 | Geoff Boucher
THE ARTS New York's 'Singing Policeman' Signs Deal Daniel Rodriguez, New York's "Singing Policeman," is recording a lush version of "God Bless America," performances of which made him a familiar presence at New York Yankees playoff games and various memorial events in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. A single will be released Dec.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1998 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a delivery glitch that could hurt receipts for what is expected to be the highest-grossing film this weekend, prints of the Steven Spielberg film "Saving Private Ryan" didn't make it to hundreds of theaters in time for the first showings on Friday. The problem appeared to be most severe in California and Arizona. Many moviegoers in the Los Angeles area hoping to be among the first to see the highly anticipated DreamWorks film starring Tom Hanks were disappointed Friday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Successfully penetrating enemy lines, "Saving Private Ryan" overcame a band of newcomers to remain in the top spot at the nation's box office. "Ryan" lost only 24% of its opening weekend business to gross an estimated $23.3 million in 2,540 theaters for a 10-day total of about $73 million. Of the quartet of newcomers, three vaulted into the top 5 in their debuts: "The Parent Trap," "The Negotiator" and "Ever After," in second, fourth and fifth, respectively.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1998 | JUDITH I. BRENNAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just 24 minutes. That is all it takes for Steven Spielberg to blast apart the propaganda of previous World War II films--not to mention his audience's perception of him as a filmmaker. He does it in graphic and relentless detail. And he has done it very deliberately. In fact, Spielberg says his deepest conviction is to have "Saving Private Ryan," which opens July 24, stand as a respectful testament to the bloody, horrific truth of what really happened to the foot soldier in the Last Great War.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1999 | LORENZA MUNOZ
Michael Kahn is nominated (his fifth time) for editing "Saving Private Ryan." Describe what you do There are times when I don't know what I'm doing. I guess I take images and sound and move it around so that it makes a nice soup, tastes good and tells a good story. How did you become involved with the picture? Steven [Spielberg] asked me if I'd like to do the film with him. Anything he does I'm happy to do.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1999 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An unusually aggressive--and expensive--marketing campaign by Miramax in support of its Oscar-nominated film "Shakespeare in Love" has jolted Hollywood and raised questions about how far a studio should go to bolster its chances for an Academy Award.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Saving Private Ryan," Steven Spielberg's harrowing World War II drama, was voted best picture of 1998 on Saturday by the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. The box office hit, which stars Tom Hanks, was the big winner--receiving three of the critics' awards. Spielberg won for best director and Janusz Kaminski was named for his cinematography.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven Spielberg's "Saving Private Ryan" has stormed through its first week in German theaters to become one of the biggest films of the year, but viewers and reviewers alike attribute its success more to the director's reputation than groundbreaking reflection on Germany's role in the war.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The weekend began as a war on two fronts for "Saving Private Ryan," battling the formidable Jamie Lee Curtis in the scare-fest "Halloween H20" on one side and Nicolas Cage in the thriller "Snake Eyes" on the other. Neither had the chops to unseat the champ and were left to duke it out for second place. A dead heat developed and, with Sunday business only estimated, the final outcome is still in doubt. For now it's "Snake Eyes" in front with an estimated $16.
NEWS
August 6, 1998 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven Spielberg's new World War II movie, "Saving Private Ryan," has been almost universally lauded for painting an unusually realistic portrait of war. Moviegoers not only see what combat looks like, but they hear it as well, from the plink of gunfire on a soldier's helmet to the boom of mortar shells to the cries of the wounded.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1999 | LORENZA MUNOZ
Michael Kahn is nominated (his fifth time) for editing "Saving Private Ryan." Describe what you do There are times when I don't know what I'm doing. I guess I take images and sound and move it around so that it makes a nice soup, tastes good and tells a good story. How did you become involved with the picture? Steven [Spielberg] asked me if I'd like to do the film with him. Anything he does I'm happy to do.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1999 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An unusually aggressive--and expensive--marketing campaign by Miramax in support of its Oscar-nominated film "Shakespeare in Love" has jolted Hollywood and raised questions about how far a studio should go to bolster its chances for an Academy Award.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1998 | JUDITH I. BRENNAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As Steven Spielberg's epic "Saving Private Ryan" storms the $100-million box-office hill in the U.S. this week, plans are underway for its launch in Europe next month. When the film strikes the key countries of France, the United Kingdom, Italy and Germany, the turnout could rival and possibly surpass North American box-office results, some in Hollywood estimate, and the experience of viewing it could be even more emotional among Europeans than it has been for American veterans.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1998 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the island of Malta in the Mediterranean Sea, Hollywood is building a submarine. When completed, the 400-ton, full-sized U-boat won't be able to dive beneath the water's surface, but it will withstand 9-foot seas and serve as the centerpiece in producer Dino DeLaurentiis' "U-571," a World War II thriller about U.S. forces who try to steal a top-secret decoding device from a German sub.
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