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April 24, 1992 | From Associated Press
The leader of Myanmar's harsh military junta has resigned for health reasons and the deputy chairman has taken over the post, the government announced Thursday. "Owing to heavy responsibilities undertaken continuously by Senior Gen. Saw Maung, his health failed, necessitating a complete rest as advised by his doctors," the official Yangon Radio said. Gen.
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NEWS
April 24, 1992 | From Associated Press
The leader of Myanmar's harsh military junta has resigned for health reasons and the deputy chairman has taken over the post, the government announced Thursday. "Owing to heavy responsibilities undertaken continuously by Senior Gen. Saw Maung, his health failed, necessitating a complete rest as advised by his doctors," the official Yangon Radio said. Gen.
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NEWS
December 16, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Gen. Saw Maung, the military leader who promised free and fair elections in Burma after his soldiers in September had crushed a violent, summer-long popular rebellion, now says that "we've got to wait a while." Addressing reporters who accompanied Thai army chief Chavalit Yongchaiyudh on a one-day trip to Rangoon this week, Saw Maung, president of a military junta, insisted: "We will definitely hold this multi-party democratic election, there's no question about it."
NEWS
February 17, 1989
Multi-party elections will be held in the spring of 1990 in Burma, the official radio said. The announcement came about five months after a military coup ended 26 years of one-party rule when military leader Gen. Saw Maung used his forces to suppress nationwide pro-democracy demonstrations in September, saying that Burma was heading toward anarchy. But he then promised fair, multi-party elections.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | Associated Press
Gen. Saw Maung on Wednesday became Burma's fourth head of government in two months. State radio said he was named prime minister by the nine-member governing council, appointed the day before and made up primarily of his military cronies. He also holds the defense and foreign affairs portfolios. Demonstrators demanding democracy and a halt to 26 years of authoritarian rule stayed off the streets Wednesday for the second day during the crackdown by the new military regime.
NEWS
February 17, 1989
Multi-party elections will be held in the spring of 1990 in Burma, the official radio said. The announcement came about five months after a military coup ended 26 years of one-party rule when military leader Gen. Saw Maung used his forces to suppress nationwide pro-democracy demonstrations in September, saying that Burma was heading toward anarchy. But he then promised fair, multi-party elections.
NEWS
September 21, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Burma's martial-law command Tuesday appointed a Cabinet of military men to run the beleaguered country, still stunned by Sunday's military takeover and the bloody resistance it triggered. No major demonstrations were reported in the streets of Rangoon, where militant protests began just hours after the army took over, but scattered clashes occurred between protesters and army patrols.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
For nearly a month, Burma's soldiers stayed in their barracks as anti-government marchers filled the streets of Rangoon and provincial cities pressing for democracy. Civil servants walked off their jobs, transportation broke down, a few hundred enlisted men defected to the demonstrators' ranks and Maung Maung, the country's first civilian president in a quarter century, made political concessions. In a tumultuous Burma, the question was: Which way would the army jump?
NEWS
September 20, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
In a bloody imposition of military rule, more than 150 people were reported killed Monday when Burmese soldiers fired into crowds of angry demonstrators in sporadic clashes across Rangoon and in several provinces. Accounts of the shootings remained confused and casualty reports varied widely. But the military command, which took power Sunday from the government of President Maung Maung, announced that soldiers shot at "violent and unruly mobs" in the Burmese capital.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The armed forces seized power Sunday in Burma, and soldiers opened fire on defiant students, Buddhist monks and other protesters in downtown Rangoon early today. Witnesses said casualties were heavy. Word of the coup came in a 4 p.m. broadcast over Rangoon Radio. Army Chief of Staff Saw Maung declared in a brief statement: "The defense forces have assumed all power in the state." The army pledged to impose law and order in the rebellious country and then hold promised multi-party elections.
NEWS
December 16, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Gen. Saw Maung, the military leader who promised free and fair elections in Burma after his soldiers in September had crushed a violent, summer-long popular rebellion, now says that "we've got to wait a while." Addressing reporters who accompanied Thai army chief Chavalit Yongchaiyudh on a one-day trip to Rangoon this week, Saw Maung, president of a military junta, insisted: "We will definitely hold this multi-party democratic election, there's no question about it."
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
For nearly a month, Burma's soldiers stayed in their barracks as anti-government marchers filled the streets of Rangoon and provincial cities pressing for democracy. Civil servants walked off their jobs, transportation broke down, a few hundred enlisted men defected to the demonstrators' ranks and Maung Maung, the country's first civilian president in a quarter century, made political concessions. In a tumultuous Burma, the question was: Which way would the army jump?
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | Associated Press
Gen. Saw Maung on Wednesday became Burma's fourth head of government in two months. State radio said he was named prime minister by the nine-member governing council, appointed the day before and made up primarily of his military cronies. He also holds the defense and foreign affairs portfolios. Demonstrators demanding democracy and a halt to 26 years of authoritarian rule stayed off the streets Wednesday for the second day during the crackdown by the new military regime.
NEWS
September 21, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Burma's martial-law command Tuesday appointed a Cabinet of military men to run the beleaguered country, still stunned by Sunday's military takeover and the bloody resistance it triggered. No major demonstrations were reported in the streets of Rangoon, where militant protests began just hours after the army took over, but scattered clashes occurred between protesters and army patrols.
NEWS
September 20, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
In a bloody imposition of military rule, more than 150 people were reported killed Monday when Burmese soldiers fired into crowds of angry demonstrators in sporadic clashes across Rangoon and in several provinces. Accounts of the shootings remained confused and casualty reports varied widely. But the military command, which took power Sunday from the government of President Maung Maung, announced that soldiers shot at "violent and unruly mobs" in the Burmese capital.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The armed forces seized power Sunday in Burma, and soldiers opened fire on defiant students, Buddhist monks and other protesters in downtown Rangoon early today. Witnesses said casualties were heavy. Word of the coup came in a 4 p.m. broadcast over Rangoon Radio. Army Chief of Staff Saw Maung declared in a brief statement: "The defense forces have assumed all power in the state." The army pledged to impose law and order in the rebellious country and then hold promised multi-party elections.
NEWS
September 20, 1988 | Associated Press
Coup leader Gen. Saw Maung formed a military-dominated government today and the official media reported that his troops killed 59 people, most of them in clashes with looters. One witness reported gunfire in downtown Rangoon today. On Monday, troops shot and killed at least 150 people in quelling widespread opposition to Saw Maung's rule. More than 200 people have been reported killed since he seized power Sunday.
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