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NEWS
October 28, 2004 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
Two guys in a grimy, fluorescent-lit bathroom -- chained, bewildered, staring at a dead body between them -- is how the gruesome new horror film "Saw" opens. Two guys in a clean, sunlit hotel restaurant in West Hollywood is how a press tour for "Saw" begins to wind down. But that fear of the unknown that hangs over the hapless duo on screen could just as easily describe the skittishness coming from "Saw" director James Wan and the film's screenwriter and costar Leigh Whannell.
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NEWS
October 28, 2004 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
Two guys in a grimy, fluorescent-lit bathroom -- chained, bewildered, staring at a dead body between them -- is how the gruesome new horror film "Saw" opens. Two guys in a clean, sunlit hotel restaurant in West Hollywood is how a press tour for "Saw" begins to wind down. But that fear of the unknown that hangs over the hapless duo on screen could just as easily describe the skittishness coming from "Saw" director James Wan and the film's screenwriter and costar Leigh Whannell.
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NEWS
October 29, 1986 | United Press International
Jackson Scholz, the Olympic runner portrayed in the Academy Award-winning movie "Chariots of Fire," died at his home at 89, never having seen the movie. His death Sunday, which was announced today, came after a long illness. He will be cremated and his ashes scattered at sea. Scholz won a gold medal for the United States in the 200-meter dash in the 1924 Olympics in Paris but lost to Harold Abrahams of England in the 100 meters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1986 | MARK HENRY, Times Staff Writer
Two Northridge children who watched explicit sex scenes on a rented videotape that was supposed to contain only a Walt Disney cartoon will receive $4,750 each in an out-of-court settlement. San Fernando Superior Court Judge Fred Rimerman last week approved the settlement reached after an attorney for Susan B. Sanders, whose children saw the videotape, threatened to sue Wherehouse Records, which rented the film, and Walt Disney Productions. The attorney, Jerry L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1986 | MARK HENRY, Times Staff Writer
Two Northridge children who watched explicit sex scenes on a rented videotape that was supposed to contain only a Walt Disney cartoon will receive $4,750 each in an out-of-court settlement. San Fernando Superior Court Judge Fred Rimerman last week approved the settlement reached after an attorney for Susan B. Sanders, whose children saw the videotape, threatened to sue Wherehouse Records, which rented the film, and Walt Disney Productions. The attorney, Jerry L.
NEWS
February 24, 1998
John Fulton, 65, a Philadelphia artist who was a professional bullfighter in Spain. Fulton became enchanted with bullfighting at age 12 when he saw a movie about a doomed bullfighter, "Blood and Sand," starring Rita Hayworth and Tyrone Power. He studied bullfighting while on a painting scholarship in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, and practiced in Mexican border towns while serving with the Army in Texas.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1998 | Sherman Alexie
I was a little Spokane Indian boy who read every book and saw every movie about Indians, no matter how terrible. I'd read those historical romance novels about the steroidal Indian warrior ravaging the virginal white schoolteacher. I can still see the cover art.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2002 | JOEL M. LEVY
Rarely has the message from Hollywood hit us so clearly. Once you see a person with mental retardation portrayed as accurately and positively as in the recently released movie "I Am Sam," you can only conclude that society has come a long way. When is the last time you saw a movie that focuses around the life of a person with a developmental disability? Sure, there was Tom Hanks in "Forrest Gump," Dustin Hoffman in "Rain Man" and Leonardo DiCaprio in "What's Eating Gilbert Grape."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2007 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
Even by Hollywood standards, the divorce between veteran ICM talent agent Risa Shapiro and horror film producer Oren Koules has been nasty. In more than two years of legal skirmishes, the power couple clashed over allegedly secret multimillion-dollar home deals, a money-losing minor league hockey team and, most pointedly, the landslide of money generated by the "Saw" movie franchise, according to court documents.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | LEONARD REED, Times Staff Writer
The day before he disappeared, Philip (Taylor) Kramer thought he would take his kids out for a bite. Finding only 40 cents in his pocket, he turned to his dad, Ray Kramer, and asked for a few dollars. Ray did what he never did: He told his son no. "It wasn't the money, of course," says Ray. "It was Taylor. He was exhausted, burned out, shot. I laughed and told him to go home and get some sleep." Taylor Kramer did, sort of.
NEWS
October 29, 1986 | United Press International
Jackson Scholz, the Olympic runner portrayed in the Academy Award-winning movie "Chariots of Fire," died at his home at 89, never having seen the movie. His death Sunday, which was announced today, came after a long illness. He will be cremated and his ashes scattered at sea. Scholz won a gold medal for the United States in the 200-meter dash in the 1924 Olympics in Paris but lost to Harold Abrahams of England in the 100 meters.
NEWS
August 6, 1998 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven Spielberg's new World War II movie, "Saving Private Ryan," has been almost universally lauded for painting an unusually realistic portrait of war. Moviegoers not only see what combat looks like, but they hear it as well, from the plink of gunfire on a soldier's helmet to the boom of mortar shells to the cries of the wounded.
BOOKS
February 4, 1996 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review
Ernest Hemingway's advice for novelists dealing with Hollywood was to stop on the east bank of the Colorado River, hold your nose, toss your screenplay over the state line, take the money and skedaddle. A gentler soul, Alice Walker had a more charitable view of Steven Spielberg when he and musician Quincy Jones approached her in 1984 about making a movie of her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, "The Color Purple." True, Spielberg was white. True, he was male.
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