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October 28, 2004 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
Two guys in a grimy, fluorescent-lit bathroom -- chained, bewildered, staring at a dead body between them -- is how the gruesome new horror film "Saw" opens. Two guys in a clean, sunlit hotel restaurant in West Hollywood is how a press tour for "Saw" begins to wind down. But that fear of the unknown that hangs over the hapless duo on screen could just as easily describe the skittishness coming from "Saw" director James Wan and the film's screenwriter and costar Leigh Whannell.
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NEWS
October 28, 2004 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
Two guys in a grimy, fluorescent-lit bathroom -- chained, bewildered, staring at a dead body between them -- is how the gruesome new horror film "Saw" opens. Two guys in a clean, sunlit hotel restaurant in West Hollywood is how a press tour for "Saw" begins to wind down. But that fear of the unknown that hangs over the hapless duo on screen could just as easily describe the skittishness coming from "Saw" director James Wan and the film's screenwriter and costar Leigh Whannell.
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NEWS
October 29, 1986 | United Press International
Jackson Scholz, the Olympic runner portrayed in the Academy Award-winning movie "Chariots of Fire," died at his home at 89, never having seen the movie. His death Sunday, which was announced today, came after a long illness. He will be cremated and his ashes scattered at sea. Scholz won a gold medal for the United States in the 200-meter dash in the 1924 Olympics in Paris but lost to Harold Abrahams of England in the 100 meters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1986 | MARK HENRY, Times Staff Writer
Two Northridge children who watched explicit sex scenes on a rented videotape that was supposed to contain only a Walt Disney cartoon will receive $4,750 each in an out-of-court settlement. San Fernando Superior Court Judge Fred Rimerman last week approved the settlement reached after an attorney for Susan B. Sanders, whose children saw the videotape, threatened to sue Wherehouse Records, which rented the film, and Walt Disney Productions. The attorney, Jerry L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1986 | MARK HENRY, Times Staff Writer
Two Northridge children who watched explicit sex scenes on a rented videotape that was supposed to contain only a Walt Disney cartoon will receive $4,750 each in an out-of-court settlement. San Fernando Superior Court Judge Fred Rimerman last week approved the settlement reached after an attorney for Susan B. Sanders, whose children saw the videotape, threatened to sue Wherehouse Records, which rented the film, and Walt Disney Productions. The attorney, Jerry L.
NEWS
February 24, 1998
John Fulton, 65, a Philadelphia artist who was a professional bullfighter in Spain. Fulton became enchanted with bullfighting at age 12 when he saw a movie about a doomed bullfighter, "Blood and Sand," starring Rita Hayworth and Tyrone Power. He studied bullfighting while on a painting scholarship in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, and practiced in Mexican border towns while serving with the Army in Texas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2000 | NORINE DRESSER
Readers expressed interest in a custom seen in the film "Angela's Ashes." As a horse-drawn hearse carried the body of one of Angela's babies to a Limerick graveyard, women lined the road and sloshed buckets of water in the horse's pathway just before it passed. Its meaning was elusive. No reference appeared in the book or the screenplay or library resources that I checked. One member of the Irish American community said, "I saw the movie and was wondering the same thing myself."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2002 | JOEL M. LEVY
Rarely has the message from Hollywood hit us so clearly. Once you see a person with mental retardation portrayed as accurately and positively as in the recently released movie "I Am Sam," you can only conclude that society has come a long way. When is the last time you saw a movie that focuses around the life of a person with a developmental disability? Sure, there was Tom Hanks in "Forrest Gump," Dustin Hoffman in "Rain Man" and Leonardo DiCaprio in "What's Eating Gilbert Grape."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1998 | Sherman Alexie
I was a little Spokane Indian boy who read every book and saw every movie about Indians, no matter how terrible. I'd read those historical romance novels about the steroidal Indian warrior ravaging the virginal white schoolteacher. I can still see the cover art.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2008 | Gary Goldstein, Special to The Times
So what's a glamorous, Jewish, gay rights activist doing playing a dowdy, evangelical Christian homophobe? For Judith Light, who stars in "Save Me" as Gayle, the founder of an ex-gay Christian ministry that specializes in curing "sexual brokenness," you could say it was a leap of faith. "You can't judge your character and play them," said Light by phone from New York, where she's shooting her second season as Claire Meade on TV's "Ugly Betty." "Gayle isn't evil, she's just misguided.
NEWS
October 29, 1986 | United Press International
Jackson Scholz, the Olympic runner portrayed in the Academy Award-winning movie "Chariots of Fire," died at his home at 89, never having seen the movie. His death Sunday, which was announced today, came after a long illness. He will be cremated and his ashes scattered at sea. Scholz won a gold medal for the United States in the 200-meter dash in the 1924 Olympics in Paris but lost to Harold Abrahams of England in the 100 meters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Ilene Woods, who provided the speaking and singing voice for the title character in Walt Disney's classic 1950 animated feature " Cinderella," has died. She was 81. Woods, a Calabasas resident, died of causes related to Alzheimer's disease Thursday at a nursing and rehabilitation center in Canoga Park, said her husband, Ed Shaughnessy, the former longtime drummer on Johnny Carson's "Tonight Show." Woods was a busy 18-year-old singer on radio in 1948 when, as a favor to two songwriter friends, Jerry Livingston and Mack David, she recorded a "demo" of a few songs they had written for Walt Disney's upcoming animated feature.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2002 | Bob Baker, Times Staff Writer
Frank Abagnale, who is about to become America's most popular con man, is standing in a darkened auditorium in downtown L.A., scaring the bejesus out of a couple hundred business people. He has been talking in a calm, quick, flawless cadence for more than two hours, flashing his 140 slide projections on a big screen, listing every manner of fraud that could befall these men and women: forgery, embezzlement, bogus checks, identity theft.
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