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Saxby Chambliss

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NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Citing his frustration with gridlock in Washington, Republican Sen. Saxby Chambliss of Georgia said Friday he will not seek reelection. Chambliss' decision to step down ensures a battle for the seat by Republicans who were already considering a primary challenge to the 69-year-old incumbent. Chambliss is one of the so-called “Gang of Six” senators trying to produce a bipartisan solution to the nation's debt and deficit problems. In a statement, Chambliss said he was "proud of my conservative voting record," and denied he feared a challenge from the right.
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NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - A round of golf with the president of the United States is a rare treat, to be sure. So hitting a hole in one while in a foursome with the commander in chief quickly became the stuff of legend on Capitol Hill after word that Sen. Saxby Chambliss had done just that. “This one's pretty special,” the Georgia Republican told reporters after returning to the Senate for a late vote. It was his second hole in one. Chambliss was part of a bipartisan outing with President Obama on Monday that included Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, a fellow Republican, and Mark Udall of Colorado, a Democrat.
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NATIONAL
October 25, 2008 | Richard Fausset, Richard Fausset is a Times staff writer.
The diners at Butch's Family Restaurant gave Republican Sen. Saxby Chambliss the warmest of welcomes when he stopped in recently. They smiled as he moved from table to table, shaking hands and asking after each of them with avuncular concern. A local pastor prayed for Chambliss, calling him a man who "stands for principles we believe in." "Aw, I'm getting a hug," said one middle-aged voter as she lunged toward the silver-haired lawmaker.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Citing his frustration with gridlock in Washington, Republican Sen. Saxby Chambliss of Georgia said Friday he will not seek reelection. Chambliss' decision to step down ensures a battle for the seat by Republicans who were already considering a primary challenge to the 69-year-old incumbent. Chambliss is one of the so-called “Gang of Six” senators trying to produce a bipartisan solution to the nation's debt and deficit problems. In a statement, Chambliss said he was "proud of my conservative voting record," and denied he feared a challenge from the right.
NEWS
October 27, 2008
Saxby Chambliss: An article in Saturday's Section A about Republican Sen. Saxby Chambliss' Georgia reelection race misidentified lawyer Walter Gordon of Hartwell, Ga. -- a supporter of Chambliss' opponent -- as David Gordon.
NATIONAL
December 3, 2008 | James Oliphant and Richard Fausset, Oliphant is a writer in our Washington bureau. Fausset is a Times staff writer.
Democrats' dream of a filibuster-proof majority in the U.S. Senate ended Tuesday when Georgia Republican Saxby Chambliss held on to his seat in a closely watched runoff election. With 96% of the precincts reporting, Chambliss was leading Democratic challenger Jim Martin, 57.5% to 42.5%. A runoff became necessary when neither candidate won 50% of the vote in last month's election.
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - A round of golf with the president of the United States is a rare treat, to be sure. So hitting a hole in one while in a foursome with the commander in chief quickly became the stuff of legend on Capitol Hill after word that Sen. Saxby Chambliss had done just that. “This one's pretty special,” the Georgia Republican told reporters after returning to the Senate for a late vote. It was his second hole in one. Chambliss was part of a bipartisan outing with President Obama on Monday that included Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, a fellow Republican, and Mark Udall of Colorado, a Democrat.
NATIONAL
December 1, 2008 | James Oliphant, Oliphant is a writer in our Washington bureau.
Jim Martin was feeling the spirit. At historically black Morris Brown College, surrounded by former Barack Obama campaign staffers and African American Reps. John Lewis (D-Ga.) and Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.), the normally unassuming, bespectacled white lawyer had discovered his inner preacher. "We're all in this together!" Martin, 63, intoned. "Talk to me!" a man shouted in response. "The Republicans believe if they have 41 votes in the Senate, they can stop this great president!" "That's right!"
NATIONAL
October 19, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The Agriculture Department will abandon plans to close more than 700 Farm Service Agency offices across the U.S. because of widespread opposition in Congress, an official said. A hearing had been scheduled Thursday in the Senate Agriculture Committee. But in a letter sent to Chairman Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.), Agriculture Department Undersecretary J.B. Penn said the agency was scrapping the plan to close 713 of the 2,351 Farm Service offices.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2008 | Times Wire Services
President-elect Barack Obama has waded into Georgia's U.S. Senate runoff, recording a radio ad supporting Democrat Jim Martin, but there's still no word on whether the president-elect will make a personal appearance. In the spot, Obama thanks Georgians who voted for him Nov. 4, then encourages support for Martin. "The elections aren't over," Obama said. "I want to urge you to turn out one more time and help elect Jim Martin to the United States Senate." Martin faces Republican Sen. Saxby Chambliss in a Dec. 2 runoff.
NATIONAL
December 3, 2008 | James Oliphant and Richard Fausset, Oliphant is a writer in our Washington bureau. Fausset is a Times staff writer.
Democrats' dream of a filibuster-proof majority in the U.S. Senate ended Tuesday when Georgia Republican Saxby Chambliss held on to his seat in a closely watched runoff election. With 96% of the precincts reporting, Chambliss was leading Democratic challenger Jim Martin, 57.5% to 42.5%. A runoff became necessary when neither candidate won 50% of the vote in last month's election.
NATIONAL
December 1, 2008 | James Oliphant, Oliphant is a writer in our Washington bureau.
Jim Martin was feeling the spirit. At historically black Morris Brown College, surrounded by former Barack Obama campaign staffers and African American Reps. John Lewis (D-Ga.) and Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.), the normally unassuming, bespectacled white lawyer had discovered his inner preacher. "We're all in this together!" Martin, 63, intoned. "Talk to me!" a man shouted in response. "The Republicans believe if they have 41 votes in the Senate, they can stop this great president!" "That's right!"
NEWS
October 27, 2008
Saxby Chambliss: An article in Saturday's Section A about Republican Sen. Saxby Chambliss' Georgia reelection race misidentified lawyer Walter Gordon of Hartwell, Ga. -- a supporter of Chambliss' opponent -- as David Gordon.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2008 | Richard Fausset, Richard Fausset is a Times staff writer.
The diners at Butch's Family Restaurant gave Republican Sen. Saxby Chambliss the warmest of welcomes when he stopped in recently. They smiled as he moved from table to table, shaking hands and asking after each of them with avuncular concern. A local pastor prayed for Chambliss, calling him a man who "stands for principles we believe in." "Aw, I'm getting a hug," said one middle-aged voter as she lunged toward the silver-haired lawmaker.
NATIONAL
May 9, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Married couples with joint incomes of up to $1.5 million from their farm operation could still qualify for crop subsidies under a five-year, $300-billion farm bill compromise that would boost the Agriculture Department's food and farm programs. Some farm couples with incomes totaling $2.5 million -- assuming $1 million is from other, nonfarm sources -- could also qualify.
NATIONAL
September 30, 2003 | From Associated Press
The nation's homeland security officers, on the lookout for terrorists, today will begin to look over the shoulder of State Department officers charged with issuing visas. A section of the Homeland Security Act, which took effect earlier this year, transferred the review process for issuing visas from the consular affairs office at the State Department to the new Homeland Security Department. President Bush on Monday signed a memo to carry out the law's visa oversight provision.
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