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July 9, 2010 | by Diane Pucin, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Mark Cavendish screamed in exaltation Friday, outsprinting game American Tyler Farrar over the line and winning the hot, windy Stage 6 at the Tour de France. Cavendish of Columbia-HTC finished the longest mileage day of racing in 5 hours, 37.42 minutes, just nosing his bike ahead of Farrar who rides for Garmin-Transitions and who is racing despite a broken bone in his wrist. The 141.4-mile route on Friday began in Montargis and was a draining day with temperatures on the road approaching 100 degrees.
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SPORTS
July 18, 2010
— Tour de France leader Andy Schleck said his main rival Alberto Contador should be worried after failing to shake him off in Sunday's 14th stage in the Pyrenees. "I don't know how Alberto is handling it, but the situation he is in now is not super," the Luxembourg rider told reporters. "It's not bad, either, but today he couldn't drop me so that gives me a lot of confidence." Defending champion Contador tried a couple of times to drop Schleck in the final climb to Ax-3 Domaines, but they both finished the stage 1 minute 8 seconds behind the day's winner Christophe Riblon.
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SPORTS
July 18, 2010
— Tour de France leader Andy Schleck said his main rival Alberto Contador should be worried after failing to shake him off in Sunday's 14th stage in the Pyrenees. "I don't know how Alberto is handling it, but the situation he is in now is not super," the Luxembourg rider told reporters. "It's not bad, either, but today he couldn't drop me so that gives me a lot of confidence." Defending champion Contador tried a couple of times to drop Schleck in the final climb to Ax-3 Domaines, but they both finished the stage 1 minute 8 seconds behind the day's winner Christophe Riblon.
SPORTS
July 12, 2010 | By Diane Pucin
Reporting from Morzine, France — On this first 2010 Tour de France rest day, Lance Armstrong rode a historic Alps climb, the Col de Joux Plane, one of the steepest of cycling's mountain rides. It was a training trip for Armstrong, cyclist Levi Leipheimer said. It was not a ride done for fun. Armstrong, 38, was working out his kinks, bumps and bruises, his aches and pains and maybe his wounded pride. His job for the next two weeks is an unexpected one — he will be a helper for Leipheimer.
SPORTS
July 9, 2010 | Diane Pucin
A day after smashing his bike to the ground in a fit of frustration after losing yet another Tour de France sprint stage, Mark Cavendish found redemption Thursday at the end of the 116.5-mile Stage 5 from Epernay to Montargis. The 24-year-old Cavendish, whose Columbia-HTC teammates led him out perfectly through the tricky finish — where the road narrows and roundabouts suddenly appear — won in 4 hours, 30.50 minutes. Another American team, Garmin-Transitions, was also at the front of the sprint pack, trying to sneak out an emotional victory for Tyler Farrar, who is riding with a broken bone in his wrist.
SPORTS
July 6, 2010 | By Diane Pucin
Reporting from Arenberg, France — A punctured tire may have popped the balloon of Lance Armstrong's Tour de France chances Tuesday. After an ill-timed flat left Armstrong pedaling furiously and ultimately alone, without a teammate left to lead him back to the front, the seven-time champion fell from fifth overall to 18th after the 132.36-mile Stage 3 from Wanze, Belgium, to the finish line here, the first in France. Yet not even his ferocious efforts over the last few miles into this mining town — where dust covered the bikes and coated the faces of riders — could save him from dropping chunks of time to some of his main rivals.
SPORTS
July 2, 2010 | By Diane Pucin
When Lance Armstrong appears at the start line Saturday in Rotterdam, Holland, for the 2010 Tour de France, it will be for the last time. The last time he takes off on the three-week, 21-stage marathon that has defined his cycling career. The last time he aims at climbing some of the highest mountains in the world. The last time he measures himself against the best in the world. Armstrong, the seven-time champion, won't be the favorite. That would be Spaniard Alberto Contador, the defending champion who was uncomfortable having Armstrong as a teammate last year.
SPORTS
July 12, 2010 | By Diane Pucin
Reporting from Morzine, France — On this first 2010 Tour de France rest day, Lance Armstrong rode a historic Alps climb, the Col de Joux Plane, one of the steepest of cycling's mountain rides. It was a training trip for Armstrong, cyclist Levi Leipheimer said. It was not a ride done for fun. Armstrong, 38, was working out his kinks, bumps and bruises, his aches and pains and maybe his wounded pride. His job for the next two weeks is an unexpected one — he will be a helper for Leipheimer.
SPORTS
February 14, 2009 | Diane Pucin
While the pre-race focus at the Amgen Tour of California has been on Lance Armstrong and his comeback, Armstrong is an unlikely overall winner. Veteran cycling commentator Phil Liggett considers the field to be the strongest in the U.S. outside of a world championship. Staff writer Diane Pucin looks at some riders worth watching. -- Overall Levi Leipheimer, Astana -- Two-time defending champion, 2008 Olympic bronze medalist and four-time top-10 finisher at Tour de France.
SPORTS
July 8, 2009 | Lauren Goldman;, Associated Press
Calling his team "simply awesome," Lance Armstrong was nearly decked out in yellow again. The seven-time champion surged from third place to second at the Tour de France on Tuesday after his Astana squad won a team time trial in a dramatic finish. Armstrong erased all but a sliver of his 40-second deficit to leader Fabian Cancellara of Switzerland in the fourth stage. The only thing separating him from the yellow jersey now is a fraction of a second.
SPORTS
July 9, 2010 | Diane Pucin
A day after smashing his bike to the ground in a fit of frustration after losing yet another Tour de France sprint stage, Mark Cavendish found redemption Thursday at the end of the 116.5-mile Stage 5 from Epernay to Montargis. The 24-year-old Cavendish, whose Columbia-HTC teammates led him out perfectly through the tricky finish — where the road narrows and roundabouts suddenly appear — won in 4 hours, 30.50 minutes. Another American team, Garmin-Transitions, was also at the front of the sprint pack, trying to sneak out an emotional victory for Tyler Farrar, who is riding with a broken bone in his wrist.
SPORTS
July 9, 2010 | by Diane Pucin, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Mark Cavendish screamed in exaltation Friday, outsprinting game American Tyler Farrar over the line and winning the hot, windy Stage 6 at the Tour de France. Cavendish of Columbia-HTC finished the longest mileage day of racing in 5 hours, 37.42 minutes, just nosing his bike ahead of Farrar who rides for Garmin-Transitions and who is racing despite a broken bone in his wrist. The 141.4-mile route on Friday began in Montargis and was a draining day with temperatures on the road approaching 100 degrees.
SPORTS
July 6, 2010 | By Diane Pucin
Reporting from Arenberg, France — A punctured tire may have popped the balloon of Lance Armstrong's Tour de France chances Tuesday. After an ill-timed flat left Armstrong pedaling furiously and ultimately alone, without a teammate left to lead him back to the front, the seven-time champion fell from fifth overall to 18th after the 132.36-mile Stage 3 from Wanze, Belgium, to the finish line here, the first in France. Yet not even his ferocious efforts over the last few miles into this mining town — where dust covered the bikes and coated the faces of riders — could save him from dropping chunks of time to some of his main rivals.
SPORTS
July 2, 2010 | By Diane Pucin
When Lance Armstrong appears at the start line Saturday in Rotterdam, Holland, for the 2010 Tour de France, it will be for the last time. The last time he takes off on the three-week, 21-stage marathon that has defined his cycling career. The last time he aims at climbing some of the highest mountains in the world. The last time he measures himself against the best in the world. Armstrong, the seven-time champion, won't be the favorite. That would be Spaniard Alberto Contador, the defending champion who was uncomfortable having Armstrong as a teammate last year.
SPORTS
June 29, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Professional cycling began wobbling when Lance Armstrong retired, then took a tumble after a string of doping scandals. Now the sport appears to be back in the saddle, at least in the eyes of corporate America. Two U.S.-based teams competing in this year's Tour de France successfully ended their prolonged searches for title sponsorships earlier this month. The team formerly known as Slipstream-Chipotle has added title sponsorship from a GPS maker and now will race as Garmin-Chipotle when the Tour begins July 5. And the team formerly known as High Road signed an outdoor apparel company as its sponsor and will race as Team Columbia.
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