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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1999
Abe Lincoln made a terrible mistake. If he had just allowed the South to secede we wouldn't have the likes of Sens. Trent Lott and Jesse Helms dictating to us today. S. DAVID SAXON Sherman Oaks
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
John Saxon might never have come to Hollywood nearly 60 years ago if he hadn't played hooky from his high school in Brooklyn one day to see a movie at the venerable Paramount Theatre at Times Square. In a story that seems ripped out of a movie script, Saxon ("A Nightmare on Elm Street," "The Reluctant Debutante") was spotted by a male modeling agent as Saxon was walking out of the Paramount. "He gave me his card," he said. "I started doing jobs for magazines, like Modern Romance, all the Macfadden publications.
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SPORTS
September 16, 1989 | MARTIN BECK, Times Staff Writer
Pity Anaheim High School punter Abe Gomez. From the first snap he took on Friday night, he was on the run. By the time Gomez had controlled the high snap from center, a pack of Loara defenders was upon him and his kick was not so much blocked as it was smothered. "I just looked back and I saw everybody (coming after me)," Gomez said. "It was scary." Gomez' terror was representative of Anaheim's night, as Loara (2-0) overwhelmed the Colonists 36-7 in a nonleague game at Glover Stadium in Anaheim.
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
As Mitt Romney landed Wednesday morning in London to launch a three-country overseas trip, an anonymous quote in a British newspapers caused a kerfuffle on both sides of the pond. A British newspaper quoted an unnamed Romney advisor as saying that President Obama's White House did not sufficiently appreciate the shared “Anglo-Saxon” heritage of the United States and the United Kingdom. The Romney campaign flatly denied that the governor or the campaign shared the sentiment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1993
In your editorial ("Listen Before You Leap" Aug. 7) you characterize the members of the Orange County Grand Jury as a "group woefully out of touch." It appears to me that you are the one who is out of touch. You, along with just about all media, constantly refer to the "Anglo" as an appellation for everyone who is not Asian, Latino or African. Anglo is a reference to a person descended from the Angle and Saxon tribes of ancient Germany and England. To refer to an Irishman, a Frenchman, an Italian or a Pole for instance as an "Anglo" is a terrible insult since all have been mortal enemies of the Anglo-Saxons for thousands of years.
NEWS
December 6, 1993 | JACK SMITH
My son Curt called me the other evening to inform me that I had committed another error in that morning's column. "Edric Cane is a man," he said. I knew what he meant. In a column admitting two previous errors (my quota for the year), I quoted part of a letter from an Edric Cane contesting my argument that one is not likely to come upon an obscene word in a dictionary by chance, since there are at least 200,000 words even in a desk dictionary.
SPORTS
August 27, 1996
Early Monday afternoon, Minnesota Viking Coach Dennis Green introduced Mike Saxon as his punter to about 700 people at a publicity luncheon. About an hour later, the Vikings released Saxon. After 11 seasons in the NFL, the last two in Minnesota, Saxon was let go in a surprising move the team said was needed to make room for special teams help.
SPORTS
August 28, 1995 | Associated Press
Irving Spikes, a backup running back for the Miami Dolphins, was freed on $5,000 bond after being arrested on battery charges for allegedly pushing his wife to the floor and trying to choke her. Spikes, 24, was picked up Saturday night at his home in Pembroke Pines, Fla., a suburb of Fort Lauderdale. Spikes voluntarily agreed to enter a domestic violence counseling program, said his agent, Drew Rosenhaus. Police were called to the home by Spikes' wife, Stacey.
SPORTS
March 8, 1998 | LON EUBANKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cal State Fullerton made a run at an upset of Utah State in the Big West Conference basketball tournament semifinals Saturday, but the Titans didn't have the firepower to pull it off. Guard Marcus Saxon's 31-point performance lifted the Eastern Division champion Aggies to a 65-56 victory over the Titans, who were doomed by their 37.3% shooting from the field. "It was too much Marcus Saxon for us," Titan Coach Bob Hawking said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
A hoard of glass and copper jugs, ceremonial crosses and other Saxon artifacts has gone on display in London, giving the public a first look at a rare find of a royal tomb from the 7th century. "To find an intact chamber grave and a moment genuinely frozen in time is a once-in-a-lifetime discovery," Ian Blair, the senior archeologist on the dig, said Thursday at the Museum of London. Nothing is left of the king who was buried in the wood-walled grave.
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
Shortly after landing in London to kick-off a three-country overseas tour, Mitt Romney on Wednesday disavowed an anonymous quote purportedly made by one of his advisors that President Obama's White House did not sufficiently appreciate the shared “Anglo-Saxon” heritage of the United States and Great Britain. “We have a very special relationship between the United States and Great Britain. It goes back to our very beginnings, cultural and historical. But I also believe the president understands that,” Romney said during an interview with Brian Williams that aired Wednesday on "NBC Nightly News.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
Behind the action of Simon Armitage's marvelous translation of the Middle English epic "The Death of King Arthur" (W.W. Norton: 306 pp., $26.95), there's an unmistakable mood of bitterness. It has nothing to do with Arthur's fate — yes, there's plenty of bitter sorrow after Arthur's last battle against Mordred, but that's not what I'm talking about. There's another, different bitterness here that belongs to the anonymous maker of this poem, which appeared long before Thomas Malory ever celebrated the legendary warrior-king in his prose "Le Morte D'Arthur.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2011 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
On a spring evening in this Mississippi town, Jim Walker dug into a plate of roast beef, macaroni and cheese, and green beans at the Palmer Home for Children and tried to swallow his frustration. The orphanage was hosting an awards dinner for 65 of its charges — some in high chairs, others in high school. The kids, who wore Easter dresses and secondhand ties, accepted prizes for spiritual growth and certificates for artistic excellence. A 22-year-old who arrived at Palmer Home at 8 months old and graduated from the University of Mississippi received a top honor.
OPINION
July 4, 2011
Independence Day 2011 dawns amid a resurgence of interest in our nation's Founding Fathers. "Tea party" conservatives in particular like to invoke them as an inspiration. Yet while it is certainly possible to find writings by individual founders that adhere closely to modern right-wing principles, this group of mostly white Anglo-Saxon Protestant property owners had profoundly differing opinions about governance — differing not only among themselves but often from the views of today's conservatives.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2011 | By Christopher Baxter
Fred Morgan Kirby could not make a speech to save his life, and he told the crowd as much that day in 1930. He donned a fedora and round spectacles, and gently clasped his cane as he gazed upon the dignitaries gathered at Lafayette College. The newly minted Kirby Hall of Civil Rights dwarfed its donor, much as the ideas of law and government it would nurture dwarfed any one man. The grand hall stood for the duties bestowed upon every (white, male) American in exchange for individual freedoms ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Sky Saxon, lead singer and founder of the 1960s band the Seeds, which had a Top 40 hit in 1967 with "Pushin' Too Hard," died Thursday at a hospital in Austin, Texas, after a brief illness. He was believed to be in his 60s. Publicist Jen Marchand said in a news release that Saxon died of heart and kidney failure after an "undiagnosed infection of his internal organs." The Seeds sprang up in Los Angeles in 1965, and their garage-band sound became a favorite of the flower-power generation.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1985
Alfred Horowitz, 62, pleaded guilty to conspiracy and fraud charges growing out of Saxon Industries' collapse in 1982. Prosecutors dropped a racketeering count that could have sent Horowitz to prison for 20 years after Horowitz agreed to plead guilty to lesser counts that carry maximum penalties of up to five years. Horowitz was to have gone on trial Sept. 9 along with former Saxon president Stanley Lurie, who still faces the racketeering charge.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2001
Barbeques Galore Ltd., an Irvine specialty retail chain, said Tuesday that it has acquired Saxon Wood Heaters, an Australian manufacturer, distributor and retailer of wood heaters and gas-fired barbecues. Terms of the cash transaction were not disclosed. Shares of Barbeques Galore closed unchanged at $3.06 on Nasdaq.
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