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November 25, 2013 | By Anne Harnagel
Fans of saxophonist Dave Koz will have an opportunity in September to join him and other talented musicians on a seven-night Alaska cruise. The “ Dave Koz and Friends at Sea” cruise begins and ends in Vancouver, Canada, with sightseeing stops in Skagway, Tracy Arm Fjord, Juneau and Ketchikan, Ala. Travelers will be able to mingle with the performers at a welcome cocktail party and at scheduled autograph sessions. The talent lineup includes trumpeter Chris Botti, saxophonists Mindy Abair and Gerald Albright and guitarist Earl Klugh, among others.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By Don Heckman
Med Flory, an alto saxophonist and founder of the Grammy-winning jazz group Supersax in addition to being an actor who appeared on numerous TV series, has died. He was 87. His son, Rex, who cared for his father during several years of heart maladies, reported that Flory died Wednesday at his home in North Hollywood. Flory had not been professionally active over the last few years, a shift from the busy demands of a career stretching over six decades. One of Hollywood's most unusual hyphenates, he was successful in two creatively demanding arenas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By Don Heckman
Med Flory, an alto saxophonist and founder of the Grammy-winning jazz group Supersax in addition to being an actor who appeared on numerous TV series, has died. He was 87. His son, Rex, who cared for his father during several years of heart maladies, reported that Flory died Wednesday at his home in North Hollywood. Flory had not been professionally active over the last few years, a shift from the busy demands of a career stretching over six decades. One of Hollywood's most unusual hyphenates, he was successful in two creatively demanding arenas.
NEWS
November 25, 2013 | By Anne Harnagel
Fans of saxophonist Dave Koz will have an opportunity in September to join him and other talented musicians on a seven-night Alaska cruise. The “ Dave Koz and Friends at Sea” cruise begins and ends in Vancouver, Canada, with sightseeing stops in Skagway, Tracy Arm Fjord, Juneau and Ketchikan, Ala. Travelers will be able to mingle with the performers at a welcome cocktail party and at scheduled autograph sessions. The talent lineup includes trumpeter Chris Botti, saxophonists Mindy Abair and Gerald Albright and guitarist Earl Klugh, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2012
JAZZ A fiery saxophonist who came to prominence in the unhinged downtown New York City scene in the '80s, Tim Berne performs from his latest album "Snakeoil. " A richly rewarding listen that balances lush composition and free expression, the recording should take on a new life onstage with the help of bandmates Oscar Noriega on clarinet, Matt Mitchell on piano and drummer Ches Smith. The Blue Whale, 123 Astronaut E.S. Onizuka St., Suite 301, L.A. 9 p.m. Sat. $10, http://www.bluewhalemusic.com .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2008 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Johnny Griffin, the tenor saxophonist known as the "Little Giant," whose big, rich sound and lightning speed made for a distinct musical signature during an era when bebop was king, has died. He was 80. Griffin died Friday at his home in France, his agent, Helene Manfredi, told Bloomberg News. The cause was not reported. Though he was often called the "world's fastest saxophonist," Griffin -- who jammed with such greats as Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane and Art Blakey -- did not see speed as the key element of his playing.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Charles Lloyd was recounting his early days as a musician and the wisdom imparted to him by the late trumpeter Booker Little when he abruptly apologized for drifting off topic. "Pardon me for telling you this story," he said, speaking by phone from his house in the hills above Santa Barbara. "I live in the wilderness, and I don't edit so well. " No apology necessary. The saxophonist, 75, has a built a career on rewarding tangents, building a body of work that's helped shape the sound of jazz from the '60s into the new millennium.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2001
Jazz name--Jazz saxophonist Bruce Eskovitz was identified by the wrong first name in an Openings listing in Wednesday's Calendar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1992
Now that we will have a saxophonist in the White House, perhaps we'll hear a different tune. LEON LASKIN Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
British composer and saxophonist John Surman, 44, on Wednesday was named winner of the Bird Prize in the Netherlands for his contributions to the development of jazz over the last two decades. A separate prize for American jazz was awarded to drummer Art Blakey for a career spanning more than half a century and for inspiring a generation of musicians. The international Bird Prize, named for jazzman Charlie Parker whose nickname was Bird, is awarded annually to a jazz musician by organizers of the Hague North Sea Jazz Festival in July.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Charles Lloyd was recounting his early days as a musician and the wisdom imparted to him by the late trumpeter Booker Little when he abruptly apologized for drifting off topic. "Pardon me for telling you this story," he said, speaking by phone from his house in the hills above Santa Barbara. "I live in the wilderness, and I don't edit so well. " No apology necessary. The saxophonist, 75, has a built a career on rewarding tangents, building a body of work that's helped shape the sound of jazz from the '60s into the new millennium.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Over time, I've come to trust Jonathan Demme's taste in music. There is something both idiosyncratic and astute about the soundtracks of his narrative features, whether a breakout hit from Bruce Springsteen in "Philadelphia," which won an Oscar for original song, or the more subtle alt-rock shadings in "Rachel Getting Married. " But Demme's documentary work carries a special mystique. The director nearly disappears behind the musicians who are so often his subjects and in doing so catches these enigmatic creatures in their natural habitat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2013 | Devin Kelly, Los Angeles Times
Don Nelson, a screenwriter, film producer and musician who co-wrote scripts for "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" - the classic American television series centered on his brother Ozzie's family - as well as for more than two dozen other films and TV series, has died. He was 86. Nelson, who had Parkinson's disease, died of an aortic aneurysm Tuesday at his home in Studio City, said his wife, Marilyn. As a staff writer for "Ozzie and Harriet," one of the longest-running family comedies in TV history, Nelson came up with Ricky Nelson's trademark catchphrase "I don't mess around, boy," and contributed to more than 200 episodes of the series with storylines anchored famously on the harmless.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013
The closing act of Lisa Mezzacappa's monthlong and reliably excellent JazzPOP series, Burn List features boundary pushing Seattle trumpeter Cuong Vu with saxophonist Greg Sinibaldi, keyboardist Aaron Otheim and drummer Chris Icasiano. Vu has performed with jazz adventurers including Pat Metheny, Stomu Takeishi and Bill Frisell, and this ensemble should feature no shortage of adventure in its own right. The Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd, L.A. Thu., 7:30 p.m. Free. http://hammer.ucla.edu/ .
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012
A rising star on the jazz scene with his immersive 2011 album "Waking Dreams," vibraphonist Chris Dingman should be in exceptional form Thursday night. His ensemble also will feature some serious talent in saxophonist Walter Smith III and pianist Gerald Clayton, both of whom have released bewitching albums as bandleaders in their own right. The Blue Whale, 123 Astronaut E.S. Onizuka St., Suite 301. Thurs., 9 p.m. $10 http://www.bluewhalemusic.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2012 | By Chris Barton
Fans of jazz and improvised music are mourning with the unexpected loss of saxophonist David S. Ware, who died Thursday night as a result of complications from a 2009 kidney transplant. He was 62 years old. A free-blowing, modern-day titan of the saxophone, Ware was not the kind of player who could've been heard at a mainstream event like the Playboy Jazz Festival. In fact it's difficult to find just about any record of the New York-based artist playing L.A. apart from a couple of '70s dates as part of Cecil Taylor's band -- and perhaps Ware's health contributed to Taylor's recent decision to cancel an upcoming L.A. performance . But Ware was a favorite among music fans of all kinds looking for an heir to the explorations of late-period John Coltrane, Pharoah Sanders and Albert Ayler.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012
A rising star on the jazz scene with his immersive 2011 album "Waking Dreams," vibraphonist Chris Dingman should be in exceptional form Thursday night. His ensemble also will feature some serious talent in saxophonist Walter Smith III and pianist Gerald Clayton, both of whom have released bewitching albums as bandleaders in their own right. The Blue Whale, 123 Astronaut E.S. Onizuka St., Suite 301. Thurs., 9 p.m. $10 http://www.bluewhalemusic.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2012 | By Chris Barton
There was a moment during Sunday night's Angel City Jazz Festival at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre that accidentally captured at least part of the festival's ongoing vision. Midway through a set of twisting compositions that occasionally recalled the music of Ornette Coleman, veteran bassist Mark Dresser was briefly framed by the music of another brassy ensemble working in the amphitheater's courtyard that featured young drummer Dan Schnelle and members of the L.A. Jazz Collective.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2012
Von Freeman was revered as a tenor saxophonist but was never a major star, worshiped by critics but perpetually strapped for cash. He seemed to purposely avoid commercial success. When trumpeter Miles Davis phoned Freeman in the 1950s looking for a replacement for John Coltrane, Freeman made a typical move - he never returned the call. His refusal to leave his native Chicago during most of his career cost him incalculable fame and fortune but also enabled him to create a body of distinctive and innovative work.
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