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NEWS
March 5, 1989
A once highly regarded Silicon Valley computer whiz has filed court documents alleging that he was forced to plead guilty to a scheme of stealing computer secrets to sell to the Soviet Union. Kevin Eric Anderson has filed a series of affidavits in federal court in San Jose, saying that his attorneys told him that he could never win acquittal and that exaggerated national security claims by prosecutors led prison officials in Texas to wrongly classify him as a convicted spy.
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NEWS
March 5, 1989
A once highly regarded Silicon Valley computer whiz has filed court documents alleging that he was forced to plead guilty to a scheme of stealing computer secrets to sell to the Soviet Union. Kevin Eric Anderson has filed a series of affidavits in federal court in San Jose, saying that his attorneys told him that he could never win acquittal and that exaggerated national security claims by prosecutors led prison officials in Texas to wrongly classify him as a convicted spy.
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NEWS
November 8, 1987
Brothers Stevan and Ivan Batinic pleaded innocent to charges that they conspired to sell supercomputer technology to the Soviet Union. The technology had a restricted, not classified, status but could have proved damaging to U.S. security if the Soviets got it, according to federal authorities. The government charged each man with five counts in an alleged scheme that the brothers hoped would net $4 million, prosecutors said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1988 | From the Associated Press
Accused American high-tech smuggler Charles McVey lost another round in his complex legal battle to avoid extradition to the United States. McVey failed Friday to win an appeal after 3 days of arguments before the British Columbia Supreme Court. The U.S. government is attempting to extradite McVey, 63, to face charges of selling classified high-technology computer equipment to the Soviet Union.
NEWS
June 22, 1988 | Associated Press
The United States has failed in its first attempt to have fugitive California businessman Charles McVey extradited from Canada on forgery charges, but prosecutors will appeal the decision to the British Columbia Court of Appeal. Justice John Bouck of the British Columbia Supreme Court, ruling on a habeas corpus application Monday, found that because McVey is not charged specifically with forgery in the United States, he cannot be extradited on that charge.
NEWS
October 24, 1987 | Associated Press
Federal agents said Friday that more arrests may be made in an alleged plot to sell the Soviet Union plans for a U.S. super-computer capable of tracking submarines and detecting incoming missiles. The plot, which allegedly involved the Soviet's top space official, was broken up when agents arrested three men after recovering plans for a billion-computations-per-second computer developed by Sunnyvale-based Saxpy Computer Corp.
NEWS
October 23, 1987 | Associated Press
An alleged plot to sell supercomputer technology with military applications to the Soviet Union for $4 million was broken up Thursday with three arrests and the recovery of computer designs, federal officials said. "This is the most significant case U.S. Customs has worked on," said Rollin Klink, special agent in charge for the U.S. Customs Service. "It makes us feel good we stopped this stuff from leaving the United States. It would have severely damaged our military."
NEWS
May 28, 1988 | Associated Press
A computer whiz has pleaded guilty to conspiring to sell $4 million in stolen supercomputer technology to the Soviet Union. Kevin Anderson of Fremont admitted in federal court Thursday that he took part in a scheme with three other people to sell the Soviets plans to a system that allows computers to process as many as 1 billion instructions per second. The technology had a restricted rather than classified status but could have proved damaging to U.S.
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