Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSaying Grace
IN THE NEWS

Saying Grace

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
February 14, 1988 | BOB WOLF
Another Tony Gwynn? That's a big order, but Mark Grace just may have the credentials to fill it. Grace, 23, followed Gwynn at San Diego State and now appears ready to join the Padres' all-star outfielder in the major leagues as a first baseman for the Chicago Cubs. Mentioning Grace in the same breath with the best hitter in the National League may seem extreme, but check his minor league statistics. He broke in with a .342 average at Class A Peoria in 1986, then hit .
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 27, 2004 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
With only two justices voting to hear the case, the Supreme Court on Monday refused to consider restoring the traditional supper prayers at Virginia Military Institute, a public college. The high court's action is the latest in a long line of decisions that tell school officials they must not promote religion or lead group prayers -- even among college students preparing for military careers. Last year, the normally conservative 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 19, 1988 | TAMARA JONES, Times Staff Writer
The moon, just out, hung over the Ozarks like a pale opal. Soon families would be saying grace over Sunday dinner; children would be clamoring to turn on the Christmas lights. It was time to go home. But in the darkening woods, four teen-agers lingered, enjoying the rush they always felt when they killed something. A kitten lay crumpled nearby. Sharing some unspoken secret, the boys exchanged furtive glances in the fading light. They were growing edgy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1993 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When ABC executives decided last year that they wanted a realistic TV comedy series from a single mom's point of view--a sort of divorced version of their massive hit "Roseanne"--they turned to "Roseanne's" producers to develop the project. Carsey-Werner Productions went out and found a seasoned comedian from the Deep South, Brett Butler, whose gruff stage routine fit the profile--much like Roseanne Arnold's early stand-up act as a frumpy housewife provided the backbone for "Roseanne."
NATIONAL
April 27, 2004 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
With only two justices voting to hear the case, the Supreme Court on Monday refused to consider restoring the traditional supper prayers at Virginia Military Institute, a public college. The high court's action is the latest in a long line of decisions that tell school officials they must not promote religion or lead group prayers -- even among college students preparing for military careers. Last year, the normally conservative 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1993 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When ABC executives decided last year that they wanted a realistic TV comedy series from a single mom's point of view--a sort of divorced version of their massive hit "Roseanne"--they turned to "Roseanne's" producers to develop the project. Carsey-Werner Productions went out and found a seasoned comedian from the Deep South, Brett Butler, whose gruff stage routine fit the profile--much like Roseanne Arnold's early stand-up act as a frumpy housewife provided the backbone for "Roseanne."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
ANNAPOLIS, Md.--Mealtime prayers at the U.S. Naval Academy might cease if the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond upholds a lower court's ban on saying grace at Virginia Military Institute. In light of the VMI case, Naval Academy officials are reviewing the legality of traditional prayers at lunch, which probably date from the school's founding 157 years ago.
BOOKS
March 30, 1997
Chris Holabird, director, Los Encinos School: "Saying Grace," by Beth Gutcheon (Harper Perennial). "I immediately related to this story of the stresses and strains that are part of daily life at any school. What then made the book so special was that it broadens to become the powerful account of one person's struggle with loss and relationships and values."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1992
It's bad enough that Vice President Dan Quayle and Sen. Jesse Helms hurl aesthetic vomit, but when the L.A. Times joins them, it's time to write to the editor. Since when is film, TV or any other art obligated to portray moral values? Art explores new ideas; entertainment feeds popular taste. How can you even suggest that the politics or wealth or morality of Hollywood has anything to do with either? Since their beginnings, the performing arts have portrayed the extraordinary: "Oedipus Rex" has even less to do with anyone's traditional values than "Silence of the Lambs."
FOOD
December 20, 1987 | JOAN DRAKE
Whether you're buying gifts for a culinary novice or an expert, an ideal present is as close as the nearest bookstore. The Times' Food staff looked at a sampling of the cookbooks released in time for this holiday season and offers the following reviews to assist last-minute shoppers. Some of these books get down to the basics, some deal with ethnic cuisines while still others are as much a feast for the eyes as for the appetite.
SPORTS
February 14, 1988 | BOB WOLF
Another Tony Gwynn? That's a big order, but Mark Grace just may have the credentials to fill it. Grace, 23, followed Gwynn at San Diego State and now appears ready to join the Padres' all-star outfielder in the major leagues as a first baseman for the Chicago Cubs. Mentioning Grace in the same breath with the best hitter in the National League may seem extreme, but check his minor league statistics. He broke in with a .342 average at Class A Peoria in 1986, then hit .
NEWS
December 4, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Norman Rockwell's 1951 painting “Saying Grace” broke auction records Wednesday when it sold at Sotheby's in New York City for $46 million. That is the highest price an American painting has ever garnered at auction, Sotheby's said. George Bellows' “Polo Crowd” set the previous record for an American painting in 1999, when it sold for $27.7 million. That sale also took place at Sotheby's. The Rockwell painting depicts a grandson and his grandmother praying at their table in a bustling restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1998 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "An Unexpected Life," the sequel to the USA Network's film "An Unexpected Family" (December 1996), Stockard Channing reprises her role as edgy New York career woman-turned-adoptive mom. Both films are written by executive producer Lee Rose. In the first, as Channing's character Barbara learned to love Matt and Megan after they were abandoned by her dysfunctional sister, the message was one of child advocacy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|