Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSb 1070
IN THE NEWS

Sb 1070

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
January 5, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - A federal judge has given opponents of Arizona's sweeping anti-illegal-immigration law access to emails, letters and memos between supporters of SB 1070 and legislators to see whether there are racial overtones in the messages. In December, U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton in Phoenix rejected arguments made by two of the law's supporters, who maintained that communications sent to lawmakers who created and supported SB 1070 were confidential. Challengers to SB 1070 called Bolton's ruling a victory because their lawsuit was based partly on allegations that legislators meant to discriminate against Latinos and other people of color.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 25, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - When Arizona took controversial stands in the past - refusing to create a Martin Luther King Jr. holiday and enacting a tough anti-illegal immigration law - state leaders shrugged off the criticism from out of state as the meddling of outsiders. But now, after the Legislature passed a measure to bolster the rights of business owners to refuse service to gays and others on the basis of religion, Arizona leaders seem to be listening to a national outcry and are urging the governor to veto the bill.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
July 15, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON -- A smartphone application that allows people to report law enforcement abuse in Arizona directly to the American Civil Liberties Union has gained instant popularity, with 3,000 people downloading the application in the first week of its launch. The application is meant to focus on recording stories of racial profiling associated with Arizona's controversial immigration enforcement law, known as SB 1070 . Since the ACLU unveiled the app on June 18, it has reported that at least 3,243 people have downloaded it -- mostly on Droid phones.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - Some Arizona business owners, still smarting from boycotts launched after the state passed a sweeping anti-illegal-immigration law, are trying to fend off a possible backlash from a new piece of legislation that has the gay community and its supporters in an uproar. Some businesses have taken to social media, saying that even if the bill does become law, they will welcome LGBT customers. The bill, approved by the Republican-controlled Senate on Wednesday and the GOP-led House on Thursday, is designed to bolster a business owner's right to refuse service to gays and others if the owner believes doing so violates the practice and observance of his or her religion.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - When Arizona took controversial stands in the past - refusing to create a Martin Luther King Jr. holiday and enacting a tough anti-illegal immigration law - state leaders shrugged off the criticism from out of state as the meddling of outsiders. But now, after the Legislature passed a measure to bolster the rights of business owners to refuse service to gays and others on the basis of religion, Arizona leaders seem to be listening to a national outcry and are urging the governor to veto the bill.
OPINION
December 1, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Last year, when the Supreme Court struck down the noxious Arizona law known as SB 1070, it sent a clear message to states seeking to enact their own immigration laws: Don't do it. The court ruled that the law, which in effect sought to bully undocumented immigrants into leaving the state, was an unconstitutional intrusion by a state government into an arena - immigration policy - that is the responsibility of the federal government. But apparently the high court's decision has done little to diminish support for such laws in Hazleton, Pa., and Farmers Branch, Texas, where officials have spent millions defiantly defending local housing ordinances intended to regulate immigration.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
A relatively evenhanded and necessarily inconclusive close-up look at immigration wars and identity politics in the Grand Canyon State, "The State of Arizona" (PBS, Monday) features major players and ordinary citizens on each side of the battle as well as some who look at both sides from a confounded middle ground. Directed by Carlos Sandoval and Catherine Tambini (collaborators on the 2004 "Farmingville," about the attempted murder of two Mexican day laborers in a Long Island town), it is set mostly around 2010 and 2011 and centers on the passage of, implementation of and challenges to SB 1070, a still-controversial multi-part anti-illegal-immigration bill.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - Some Arizona business owners, still smarting from boycotts launched after the state passed a sweeping anti-illegal-immigration law, are trying to fend off a possible backlash from a new piece of legislation that has the gay community and its supporters in an uproar. Some businesses have taken to social media, saying that even if the bill does become law, they will welcome LGBT customers. The bill, approved by the Republican-controlled Senate on Wednesday and the GOP-led House on Thursday, is designed to bolster a business owner's right to refuse service to gays and others if the owner believes doing so violates the practice and observance of his or her religion.
NATIONAL
February 1, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - Arizona, which has tried to school the federal government in immigration enforcement, again wants to teach the U.S. a lesson. This time, a junior state lawmaker intends to take on the National Security Agency, which has been under fire for controversial data-collection tactics that include keeping records of every telephone number dialed in the U.S. for five years. State Sen. Kelli Ward, a tea party Republican who represents the Lake Havasu area, introduced a bill this month intended to limit NSA operations in Arizona.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - The mother calling from the Mexican state of Chihuahua hadn't heard from her son for days and she feared the worst. Her voice cracked. She spoke quickly. She told the young man on the other end of the phone that she needed help. In Tucson, a meticulously coiffed young operator wearing a dark tie responded calmly in Spanish. "When was the last time you spoke with him?" he asked. They last talked, she said, right before her 23-year-old son embarked on an illicit journey into the United States, trudging through the Arizona desert.
NATIONAL
February 1, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - Arizona, which has tried to school the federal government in immigration enforcement, again wants to teach the U.S. a lesson. This time, a junior state lawmaker intends to take on the National Security Agency, which has been under fire for controversial data-collection tactics that include keeping records of every telephone number dialed in the U.S. for five years. State Sen. Kelli Ward, a tea party Republican who represents the Lake Havasu area, introduced a bill this month intended to limit NSA operations in Arizona.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
A relatively evenhanded and necessarily inconclusive close-up look at immigration wars and identity politics in the Grand Canyon State, "The State of Arizona" (PBS, Monday) features major players and ordinary citizens on each side of the battle as well as some who look at both sides from a confounded middle ground. Directed by Carlos Sandoval and Catherine Tambini (collaborators on the 2004 "Farmingville," about the attempted murder of two Mexican day laborers in a Long Island town), it is set mostly around 2010 and 2011 and centers on the passage of, implementation of and challenges to SB 1070, a still-controversial multi-part anti-illegal-immigration bill.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - A federal judge has given opponents of Arizona's sweeping anti-illegal-immigration law access to emails, letters and memos between supporters of SB 1070 and legislators to see whether there are racial overtones in the messages. In December, U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton in Phoenix rejected arguments made by two of the law's supporters, who maintained that communications sent to lawmakers who created and supported SB 1070 were confidential. Challengers to SB 1070 called Bolton's ruling a victory because their lawsuit was based partly on allegations that legislators meant to discriminate against Latinos and other people of color.
OPINION
December 1, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Last year, when the Supreme Court struck down the noxious Arizona law known as SB 1070, it sent a clear message to states seeking to enact their own immigration laws: Don't do it. The court ruled that the law, which in effect sought to bully undocumented immigrants into leaving the state, was an unconstitutional intrusion by a state government into an arena - immigration policy - that is the responsibility of the federal government. But apparently the high court's decision has done little to diminish support for such laws in Hazleton, Pa., and Farmers Branch, Texas, where officials have spent millions defiantly defending local housing ordinances intended to regulate immigration.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - The mother calling from the Mexican state of Chihuahua hadn't heard from her son for days and she feared the worst. Her voice cracked. She spoke quickly. She told the young man on the other end of the phone that she needed help. In Tucson, a meticulously coiffed young operator wearing a dark tie responded calmly in Spanish. "When was the last time you spoke with him?" he asked. They last talked, she said, right before her 23-year-old son embarked on an illicit journey into the United States, trudging through the Arizona desert.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON -- A smartphone application that allows people to report law enforcement abuse in Arizona directly to the American Civil Liberties Union has gained instant popularity, with 3,000 people downloading the application in the first week of its launch. The application is meant to focus on recording stories of racial profiling associated with Arizona's controversial immigration enforcement law, known as SB 1070 . Since the ACLU unveiled the app on June 18, it has reported that at least 3,243 people have downloaded it -- mostly on Droid phones.
NATIONAL
April 26, 2012 | By Megan Kimble
TUCSON -- On the day the Supreme Court considered the constitutionality of Arizona's law to combat illegal immigration, Arizonans reflected on what the controversy over the law had meant for the state. “It makes me sad,” said Brittny Mejia, a 19-year-old sophomore at the University of Arizona in Tucson. “I don't like what's happening in the state.” Kathleen Hertenstein, who teaches English as a second language at the university and has lived in Tucson for 20 years, said the law certainly had tarnished the state's reputation in the eyes of many.
OPINION
April 23, 2012
For nearly two years, Arizona has defended SB 1070, a dangerous law that attempts to turn local law enforcement officers into federal immigration agents. The courts have repeatedly rejected Arizona's arguments that the law isn't an attempt to interfere with federal authority to regulate immigration but rather an effort to work cooperatively with Washington. On Wednesday, state officials will make a final pitch to the U.S. Supreme Court. The justices should strike down the provisions in question as an unconstitutional intrusion into the federal government's exclusive authority to make and enforce immigration laws.
NATIONAL
June 27, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
PHOENIX - If I'm traveling with other Latinos in a carpool will I be stopped? Will you accept my Mexican-issued ID? If I witness a crime, should I call the police? One by one, Phoenix Police Chief Daniel Garcia tried to reassure the questioners gathered at a Phoenix high school, saying repeatedly that people would not be detained without reason under Arizona's landmark immigration law. Across the state, the law's "show me your papers" provision upheld by the Supreme Court has created confusion and anxiety, and moved Latinos - both legal and illegal residents - to ask an overriding question: How can you promise we won't be singled out because of how we look?
NATIONAL
April 26, 2012 | By Megan Kimble
TUCSON -- On the day the Supreme Court considered the constitutionality of Arizona's law to combat illegal immigration, Arizonans reflected on what the controversy over the law had meant for the state. “It makes me sad,” said Brittny Mejia, a 19-year-old sophomore at the University of Arizona in Tucson. “I don't like what's happening in the state.” Kathleen Hertenstein, who teaches English as a second language at the university and has lived in Tucson for 20 years, said the law certainly had tarnished the state's reputation in the eyes of many.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|