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BUSINESS
November 20, 2001 | Associated Press
William Daley, brother of Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley and former chairman of Al Gore's presidential campaign, was named president of SBC Communications, the former regional Bell System phone company. Daley will be responsible for strategic planning, regulatory matters, governmental initiatives, external affairs and international affairs. The hiring of Daley, 53, marks the first time that San Antonio-based SBC has hired such a senior officer from outside its ranks.
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BUSINESS
October 28, 2005 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
AT&T Corp. may be history, but its name will live on. SBC Communications Inc., which could get federal approval as early as today to acquire one of the nation's most iconic companies, said Thursday that it would adopt the AT&T name as its own. The announcement, which SBC hinted at previously, came as antitrust lawyers in the Justice Department cleared the $16-billion merger as well as the $8.5-billion purchase of MCI Inc. by Verizon Communications Inc.
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BUSINESS
February 15, 2000 | Associated Press
SBC Communications Inc. said it's slashing the monthly fee and eliminating installation charges for high-speed Internet access via digital subscriber line, or DSL. The basic DSL service, now available only in parts of SBC's 13-state region, will be reduced by $10 to $39.95 per month. The normal equipment and installation charges, often as much as $300, will be waived. SBC, the local phone company through most of the Southwest and Midwest, is the nation's largest DSL provider.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
SBC Communications Inc. will probably change its name to AT&T Corp. once the combination of the two companies is complete, people familiar with the matter said. The AT&T brand is likely to be chosen because it is recognized globally, said the people, who declined to be identified. Executives at San Antonio-based SBC have been considering the change since the company in January agreed to buy AT&T for $16 billion. A decision to become AT&T would keep alive a name that is synonymous with U.S.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1996 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department on Tuesday gave the green light to the $16-billion merger of Pacific Telesis Group and SBC Communications Inc., removing one of several regulatory hurdles that the landmark deal must clear before it can be finalized. In a separate decision, the department ruled that US West Inc. can proceed with its $11.8-billion acquisition of the nation's third-largest cable operator, Continental Cablevision Inc.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Hewlett-Packard Co. sued a unit of SBC Communications Inc., seeking to invalidate five patents for data-handling systems. A lawsuit filed in federal court in Delaware on Aug. 12 contends that SBC Laboratories Inc. since 2001 has asked Hewlett-Packard to pay millions of dollars to license the patents. Palo Alto-based Hewlett-Packard said that it didn't infringe the patents, that they were not valid and that it expected SBC to sue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2000
Re "Two Cities Accuse PacBell of DSL Discrimination," Sept. 26 SBC Communications, the parent of Pacific Bell, is leading the competitive broadband industry in providing high-speed Internet access via digital subscriber line (DSL) technology to its valued customers in California and beyond. Through its Project Pronto initiative, the company will spend $6 billion to make DSL available to 80% of its customers by the end of 2002. No one is moving faster to meet the marketplace demand for high-speed DSL Internet access.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
SBC Communications Inc. will probably change its name to AT&T Corp. once the combination of the two companies is complete, people familiar with the matter said. The AT&T brand is likely to be chosen because it is recognized globally, said the people, who declined to be identified. Executives at San Antonio-based SBC have been considering the change since the company in January agreed to buy AT&T for $16 billion. A decision to become AT&T would keep alive a name that is synonymous with U.S.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2000 | Reuters
SpectraSite Holdings Inc. said it would pay local telephone company SBC Communications $1.3 billion for lease rights to 3,900 wireless communications towers, giving SpectraSite the largest tower portfolio in the top 50 U.S. markets. The deal comes as telecommunications companies shift the high cost of building and maintaining wireless communications towers to specialists. SpectraSite forged a similar pact with wireless telephone carrier Nextel Communications Inc. last year.
BUSINESS
May 26, 2000 | From Associated Press
A day after SBC Communications, the San Antonio-based parent of California's Pacific Bell, accused Time Warner of anti-competitive tactics in the battle for high-speed Internet business, similar allegations were lodged against the Texas firm. A group of Internet providers has filed complaints with the Texas Public Utility Commission, some alleging that SBC is trying to monopolize the Internet market.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Hewlett-Packard Co. sued a unit of SBC Communications Inc., seeking to invalidate five patents for data-handling systems. A lawsuit filed in federal court in Delaware on Aug. 12 contends that SBC Laboratories Inc. since 2001 has asked Hewlett-Packard to pay millions of dollars to license the patents. Palo Alto-based Hewlett-Packard said that it didn't infringe the patents, that they were not valid and that it expected SBC to sue.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2004
"Math Errors Force Delay in PUC Phone Rate Vote" (July 6) should serve as an eye-opener to consumers and regulators regarding SBC Communications Inc.'s real agenda in California. After claiming that it cost $29 to maintain its telephone wires, SBC's Cynthia Marshall acknowledges that the company would be "satisfied" with getting $21 in reimbursement from competitors wishing to lease those same lines. Say what? When has a company ever been satisfied with recouping less than its costs?
BUSINESS
March 12, 2004
* California's dominant local phone company, SBC Communications Inc., paid Chief Executive Edward Whitacre $19.5 million in 2003, including a $5.7-million bonus.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2003
Regarding "AT&T Challenges SBC's Bid to Double Wholesale Phone Rates" (Oct. 23): For ordinary Californians there's a lot more at stake in the debate over wholesale phone rates than who's winning the war of words between AT&T Corp. and SBC Communications Inc. Consumers are saving hundreds of millions of dollars each year thanks to the Public Utilities Commission's decision to reduce wholesale rates. If wholesale rates go back up, competition will suffer, and those savings will be at risk.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2003
"AT&T Challenges SBC's Bid to Double Wholesale Phone Rates" (Oct. 23), which reports that one major telecom competitor, AT&T Corp., has invested $750 million in California, paints only half the picture. Dozens of other competitive telecommunications companies, many of which are members of Caltel, are likewise invest- ing heavily in California's tele- com infrastructure. Such investments, both large and small, are crucial to the growth of California's economy. The existence of viable competition in California prods telecom monopolies such as SBC Communications Inc. into investment instead of profit taking and job cutting.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2003
Admittedly, telephone regulation issues can be complicated and beg for simplification. But not the kind of simplification columnist Michael Hiltzik provided ("SBC, It's All in the Way You Look at It," June 23). For example, California's 1989 New Regulatory Framework for telephone companies was the first of its kind, starting a form of oversight that has been copied by most states. It directly limits phone company prices while requiring quality service, all in ways that insulate customers from the financial effects of competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1999 | Times Wire Services
SBC Communications Inc. said it agreed to buy the cellular telephone operations of cable TV operator Comcast Corp. for $400 million in cash. The acquisition of Comcast Cellular Corp. rounds out SBC's wireless operations in the heavily populated Northeast. San Antonio-based SBC is already the third-largest U.S. wireless provider, serving more than 6.5 million customers in 16 states and the District of Columbia. With its planned acquisition of Ameritech Corp.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1997 | LESLIE HELM and GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As telecommunications giants AT&T Corp. and SBC Communications Inc. proceed with merger talks, the dark cloud looming over the discussions are the costly and perhaps insurmountable legal and regulatory obstacles that such a deal would face, antitrust and telecom experts said Tuesday. "It's like putting a man on the moon," said David Roddy, chief telecommunications economist at Deloitte & Touche and a former member of the Justice Department's antitrust division.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2003 | Michael Hiltzik
For telephone customers of SBC Communications who have suffered through periodic service outages, days-long waits for repair service, abusive sales tactics and other such peculiarities of our Texas-based local phone utility, two state public utilities commissioners last week issued a report that might come as quite a surprise. The report praised SBC for generally "good service quality." Written by PUC President Michael R. Peevey and Commissioner Susan P.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2002
It's not surprising that SBC Communications Inc.'s Ed Whitacre isn't exactly delighted with the current state of affairs in telecom ("For SBC's Chairman, a Distance to Go," Oct. 28). That's because his company is starting to face the kind of competition the 1996 Telecommunications Act envisioned. And like any good monopolist, he doesn't like it. SBC's efforts to push network connection charges for competitors well above retail rates is a desperate and anti-consumer reaction to the development of meaningful local competition in the state.
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