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BUSINESS
August 23, 2005 | From Reuters
Private equity firms Permira and Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. agreed to buy SBS Broadcasting for about 1.7 billion euros ($2.1 billion) in cash to access some of Europe's fastest-growing television markets. The firms said they planned to take the company private and take on 170 million euros of debt in Luxembourg-based SBS, which has TV and radio stations in Denmark, Sweden, Hungary and other countries, reaching a total of about 100 million people.
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BUSINESS
August 23, 2005 | From Reuters
Private equity firms Permira and Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. agreed to buy SBS Broadcasting for about 1.7 billion euros ($2.1 billion) in cash to access some of Europe's fastest-growing television markets. The firms said they planned to take the company private and take on 170 million euros of debt in Luxembourg-based SBS, which has TV and radio stations in Denmark, Sweden, Hungary and other countries, reaching a total of about 100 million people.
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BUSINESS
March 11, 2000 | Bloomberg News
United Pan-Europe Communications, Europe's second-largest cable-television company, has agreed to buy the 77% of SBS Broadcasting it doesn't already own for $2.8 billion in cash and stock. UPC offered $40 cash and 0.19048 of a UPC share for each share of SBS, which owns TV and radio stations in 10 European countries. Harry Evans Sloan, a Los Angeles native who founded SBS after selling New World Entertainment to financier Ronald Perelman, will join UPC's supervisory board.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2000 | Bloomberg News
United Pan-Europe Communications, Europe's second-largest cable-television company, has agreed to buy the 77% of SBS Broadcasting it doesn't already own for $2.8 billion in cash and stock. UPC offered $40 cash and 0.19048 of a UPC share for each share of SBS, which owns TV and radio stations in 10 European countries. Harry Evans Sloan, a Los Angeles native who founded SBS after selling New World Entertainment to financier Ronald Perelman, will join UPC's supervisory board.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2000 | Times Staff and Bloomberg News
Microsoft Corp.'s co-founder, along with other backers, is investing $33.2 million in the loss-plagued Canadian film producer and distributor of such films as the current "Mr. Death" and the critically acclaimed "Gods and Monsters." Billionaire Paul Allen will acquire the stake through his Vulcan Ventures Inc. investment vehicle to help Lions Gate shore up its cash position.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2000 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jon Feltheimer has been named vice chairman and chief executive of Lions Gate Entertainment, the Vancouver, Canada-based entertainment company and distributor of independent films such as "Dogma" and the upcoming "American Psycho." Feltheimer, who until last year was president of Sony Pictures Entertainment's television group, became a director of Lions Gate in January, after spearheading a $33-million round of financing for the company.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2005 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Veteran media businessman Harry E. Sloan on Monday was named chairman and chief executive of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. Sloan, 55, also is investing in the Los Angeles company, now owned by a consortium of four private equity firms and two media companies, Sony Corp. and Comcast Corp. Through a cash investment and stock options he may potentially earn, Sloan could own about 5% of MGM, said a source familiar with the matter.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2006 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. formally unveiled plans Wednesday to relaunch the moribund studio as a domestic movie distributor, going public with plans that had been expected for more than a month. At a press luncheon at MGM's Century City headquarters, Chief Executive Harry Sloan and Chief Operating Officer Rick Sands took the wraps off the company's initial slate of a dozen releases this year.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2006 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Hollywood's lion isn't roaring yet, but it may be purring soon. Entertainment business veteran Harry Sloan, who took over Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. last fall, is working on plans to rebuild the scaled-back company by returning it to its roots as a domestic theatrical distributor. Sloan is in serious negotiations with several top production entities -- and is about to close a deal with Miramax co-founder Harvey Weinstein's new company -- to supply MGM with an annual slate of movies.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2000 | CLAUDIA ELLER and JAMES BATES
It could be a great notion. Take a batch of the tiny film, video and television companies struggling to survive in Hollywood's backwater, roll them up into one larger company with a sizable film library, then fire a lot of people to slash overhead. Voila! An entertainment company with a future. But, can this cobbled-together company fly?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2001 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Alias," the new prime-time action show that premieres this fall on ABC, follows a waifish graduate student whose friends and professors have no idea that she is trained to kill. She's a spy who delivers chin-high kicks, snaps car antennas into the eyes of attackers and keeps her secrets even as an interrogator yanks out one of her molars with pliers.
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