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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1999
Re "Public Comment, Input Play Heavily in SCAG's Inclusive Planning Efforts," Ventura County Perspective article by Supervisor Judy Mikels, Jan. 17. In Ms. Mikels' zeal to criticize Patricia Feiner Arkin, our supervisor forgets that one who lives in a glass house should not throw stones. She alleged that the Southern California Assn. of Governments has taken extraordinary efforts to incorporate the concerns and inputs of all, including the public. The facts demonstrate otherwise. There were four potential occasions when SCAG's master environmental impact report was to be discussed in Ventura County.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2008 | Anna Gorman
The Southern California Assn. of Governments on Thursday named its former planning director, Hasan Ikhrata, as its new executive director. The organization conducted a nationwide search before deciding on Ikhrata, who succeeds Mark Pisano. The association is a regional planning organization for six Southern California counties: Los Angeles, Imperial, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1997
It is no wonder Orange County officials have an ongoing conflict with the Southern California Assn. of Governments ("Regional Transit Study Puts O.C. Projects at Risk," March 11). Instead of focusing on present transportation problems, they choose to ignore those problems and project grandiose projects such as a new freeway bored through the Santa Ana Mountains and a national forest. This proposed freeway proves that Southern California is the national center for thinking up new ways to rape the land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2003 | Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writer
A move to put Orange County Supervisor Chuck Smith back on a regional planning board was tabled Monday after protesters argued that he would use his position to promote an airport at El Toro. The board of the Orange County Transportation Authority decided unanimously to refer to its committees the decision on whether Smith should be appointed to the Southern California Assn. of Governments. Designating a member on SCAG -- the authority's first -- would cost OCTA $25,000 a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1992
In response to "A Powerful Tool to Shape Growth," Commentary, Nov. 27: UCLA Urban Planning Dean Richard Weinstein postulates that the billions of dollars voters have approved for transportation and transit improvements in Los Angeles and adjacent counties will have a powerful effect on growth and development of the region. On this, everyone can agree. He goes on to argue the need for coordinated policy-making. He calls for "constructive engagement" of single-purpose transportation and air quality planning agencies with the Southern California Assn.
REAL ESTATE
August 20, 1989
Kaplan's commentary refers to the Southern California Assn. of Governments (SCAG) showing that new freeways attract more traffic. It is more likely that building new shopping centers is the attraction for more traffic, but I haven't heard of any studies by SCAG that would support curtailing new shopping center construction. To the contrary, SCAG promotes new development. In fact, SCAG member city Pasadena ". . . has long sought a developer to deliver . . . " Pasadena's Marketplace block, according to Morris Newman's article in the same Real Estate Section.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1990
"Consolidate California Sprawl by Regional, Responsible Government" (by Ray Remy and Dan Garcia, Opinion, March 25) not only assumes regional and responsible are synonymous, but is a rewrite of the SCAG (Southern California Assn. of Governments) elitist theology that the people's preference for "a detached single family home . . . a private automobile . . . and strong local governments" is to be dismissed by bigger-is-better regionalists as "an anachronistic collective image of the ideal metropolitan area."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1997
I read with interest the March 11 article about the draft report by the Southern California Assn. of Governments and the reaction to it by the Orange County Board of Supervisors. The report is excluding many key Orange County transportation projects from its plan. Alarmed county officials are demanding these projects be incorporated into the plan. The relationship between Orange County supervisors and SCAG has been rather poor. The Board of Supervisors is bothered by the power the agency has over their priorities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1988
Re: Editorial, "Useless Criticism" (Oct. 30): Having been involved directly with the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) and the Southern California Assn. of Governments (SCAG), it is my impression that those two agencies are not interested in receiving input from others or building consensus on what measures should be implemented to attain clean air. SCAQMD and SCAG do not appear to be willing to accept any criticism or suggestion as to how this goal could be reached.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1987 | MAYERENE BARKER, Times Staff Writer
The Santa Clarita Valley is expected to grow from its present population of 120,000 to 270,000 by the year 2010, an increase of 125%, a Southern California Assn. of Governments planner said Monday. Bijan Yarjani also told a meeting of a SCAG committee studying future transportation needs of the valley that, by 2010, housing units will increase by 241%, to 100,000, and the number of people working in the area will increase by 315%, to 98,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2002 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal funding for Orange County transportation projects could be jeopardized if a bill approved by the Legislature this week is signed by Gov. Gray Davis. The bill, written by Assemblyman George Nakano (D-Torrance), requires Southern California's regional planning agency to provide a "fair-share distribution" of the burdens of airport growth among Orange, Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Riverside, Ventura and Imperial counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2002 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Southern California Assn. of Governments, the regional planning agency for a vast, six-county area with 17 million residents, has been designated a "high-risk" recipient of state and federal funds after government auditors found a history of financial and other internal problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2001 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine cities fighting Orange County's plans to build an airport at the closed El Toro Marine base voted late Tuesday to sue Newport Beach over a mailer and TV advertisement that suggest the cities' alternative for a large urban park at El Toro would result in a tax increase. The El Toro Reuse Planning Authority also voted unanimously to file a lawsuit against a regional panel's endorsement of a large international airport at El Toro. The lawsuit against the Southern California Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001
SCAG projects a reasonable 13% gain in Orange County population by 2020, but an incredible 200% growth in Orange County air travel (from 12.5 million at John Wayne and LAX today, to 38 million passengers per year in 2025). The projected near tripling of the rate at which we all fly (to 12 flights per county resident in 2025, from 4.5 today) defies reason. LAX's greater number of flights and destinations, its complete dominance of international travel and its greater accessibility to travelers in western and northern Orange County result in 40% of all Orange County travelers using LAX; this will remain true in 2020, but SCAG projections mysteriously ignore this.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2001
Re "Airport Debate Spreads," (editorial, March 11): SCAG was organized by Orange County and all the other governments of Southern California to plan and help resolve future needs of Southern California. In fact, it is just for such needs as airports, freeways and public transportation that SCAG was formed to provide balanced and objective planning for Southern California. Somehow The Times seems to think that Orange County can be walled off from the rest of Southern California and exist as a separate country, which ignores the fact that we are a vital part of this region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2001
One need look no farther than the neighborhoods and cities of Orange County to see how localized the debate over new airports has become in Southern California. Within a radius of several miles, it is possible to find passionate disagreement on the future of John Wayne Airport and the proposed new commercial airport at El Toro.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2001
Re "Airport Debate Spreads," (editorial, March 11): SCAG was organized by Orange County and all the other governments of Southern California to plan and help resolve future needs of Southern California. In fact, it is just for such needs as airports, freeways and public transportation that SCAG was formed to provide balanced and objective planning for Southern California. Somehow The Times seems to think that Orange County can be walled off from the rest of Southern California and exist as a separate country, which ignores the fact that we are a vital part of this region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001
SCAG projects a reasonable 13% gain in Orange County population by 2020, but an incredible 200% growth in Orange County air travel (from 12.5 million at John Wayne and LAX today, to 38 million passengers per year in 2025). The projected near tripling of the rate at which we all fly (to 12 flights per county resident in 2025, from 4.5 today) defies reason. LAX's greater number of flights and destinations, its complete dominance of international travel and its greater accessibility to travelers in western and northern Orange County result in 40% of all Orange County travelers using LAX; this will remain true in 2020, but SCAG projections mysteriously ignore this.
NEWS
March 2, 2001 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A regional panel recommended Thursday that much of Southern California's future airport growth be shifted from Los Angeles to Orange County at the retired El Toro Marine base, igniting what is shaping up as a cross-county airport battle. The Southern California Assn. of Governments voiced strong support for a large commercial airfield at El Toro they say should accommodate nearly 30 million passengers a year, more than even Orange County supporters of the controversial airfield recommend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2001
Re "Let Public in on FAA Hearings," Orange County editorial, Jan. 14: We read that an FAA technical study report says there are serious safety problems at El Toro, but that an FAA airport official says there are no problems. We certainly have every right to expect the FAA to get the El Toro safety story right, free of political spin. But the real El Toro story is about the unproven need for a second ($7.2 billion) airport, while the current airport is used to half capacity; about the noise and pollution El Toro would cause, and which the county now admits it cannot remedy; about massive airport traffic disruptions throughout the county; and about the public trust which three of five supervisors are destroying, as they ignore the clearly stated will of the vast majority of the county.
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