Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsScalpers
IN THE NEWS

Scalpers

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
August 21, 2012
Re "Stomping on scalpers," Editorial, Aug. 12 In an editorial the day before the piece on scalpers appeared, The Times criticized the state for moving too slowly to reduce our prison population. I believe The Times was correct. However, in the face of prison and jail overcrowding, The Times suggests that illegal ticket scalping should be solved through harsher but no longer available criminal sanctions. This type of quality-of-life crime by repeat offenders no longer results in meaningful jail time.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2013 | By Melanie Mason and Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Lawmakers on Tuesday sent the governor proposals to further curb cellphone use by teenage drivers and to clamp down on scalpers who electronically scoop up blocks of tickets for concerts and sporting events. The cellphone measure would bar those younger than 18 from using voice-operated hands-free texting programs while behind the wheel. They already are banned from using cellphones while driving, even with hands-free devices. "Distractions from using a voice-operated device endanger not only the driver but other motorists as well as pedestrians," said the bill's author, state Sen. Cathleen Galgiani (D-Stockton)
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2012 | By Alex Pham and Andrew Blankstein
Los Angeles City Atty. Carmen Trutanich, who is seeking a court order against ticket scalpers, accepted $18,000 in contributions from executives of Live Nation Entertainment Inc., a Beverly Hills company that stands to benefit from the proposed injunction. Trutanich, whose unsuccessful run for district attorney in June left him $112,000 in debt, has filed a request for a civil injunction to prevent ticket resellers from hawking their wares within 100 yards of Staples Center, Dodger Stadium, the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and other sports and music venues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
Jimmy Camp of Orange says he has been frustrated trying to buy concert or sporting-event tickets online just as they go on sale only to see them sell out within minutes before he can buy anything. He blames ticket-buying software that allows scalpers to sweep up thousands of tickets before regular fans get a shot. On Tuesday, a state Assembly panel approved legislation that would make it a misdemeanor to use such robotic software to buy tickets. “Fans deserve fair access,” Camp told the Assembly Judiciary Committee, which voted 8-0 to approve AB 329. It still requires approval by the full Assembly and Senate.
OPINION
August 12, 2012
Unable to stop ticket scalpers from repeatedly violating city laws, City Atty. Carmen Trutanich has filed suit to bar 17 of them - and potentially many more - from setting foot anywhere near five of Los Angeles' most popular sports and concert venues. The injunction sought by Trutanich is the same forceful tool he has used repeatedly against a growing list of targets, including violent criminal gangs, graffiti "taggers" and drug dealers on skid row. And while critics complain about injunctions' effect on civil liberties, there are times when they're appropriate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
Jimmy Camp of Orange says he has been frustrated trying to buy concert or sporting-event tickets online just as they go on sale only to see them sell out within minutes before he can buy anything. He blames ticket-buying software that allows scalpers to sweep up thousands of tickets before regular fans get a shot. On Tuesday, a state Assembly panel approved legislation that would make it a misdemeanor to use such robotic software to buy tickets. “Fans deserve fair access,” Camp told the Assembly Judiciary Committee, which voted 8-0 to approve AB 329. It still requires approval by the full Assembly and Senate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2012 | By Andrew Blankstein and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
For years, prosecutors have used court injunctions to prevent gang members, drug dealers and even graffiti vandals from congregating in certain areas. But now, the L.A. city attorney's office wants to use the powerful legal tool on a decidedly different target: ticket scalpers. City Atty. Carmen Trutanich filed court papers this week asking a judge to bar 17 prolific ticket scalpers from being anywhere near Dodger Stadium, Staples Center, the Nokia Theatre, the Coliseum and USC's Galen Center.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2012 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Brusque with a 2-day-old stubble and a cigarette dangling from his lip, Zhao Xin is the last guy you'd want waiting on you at the Apple store Genius Bar. But if you need to get your hands on a genuine iPhone immediately, Zhao is your man. Skimpy supplies of the Apple Inc. smartphone gave rise to scalpers like Zhao who prowl the perimeter of the company's flagship store here touting their wares to anyone within earshot. By hoarding and smuggling in the devices, they satisfied an unmet demand and charged a premium.
NEWS
May 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
Tickets for a Mass to be celebrated by Pope John Paul II in Finland next week are being sold on the black market for about $160, reports said Monday. The Roman Catholic Church condemned the scalpers, saying all 7,900 tickets it has given out were free. "There are still about 1,000 people on the waiting list for the holy Mass," church authorities said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2009 | Associated Press
Times just got tougher for ticket scalpers in New York, home to some of the world's biggest concerts and sports events. Reselling event tickets at large markups is now illegal because state lawmakers haven't agreed to extend a resale law that expired Monday. The law had allowed unlimited markups on tickets since 2007 in order to let the free market rule. But some distributors have charged dramatically more than the original price for the hottest tickets. For now, the old law rules.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2012 | By Alex Pham and Andrew Blankstein
Los Angeles City Atty. Carmen Trutanich, who is seeking a court order against ticket scalpers, accepted $18,000 in contributions from executives of Live Nation Entertainment Inc., a Beverly Hills company that stands to benefit from the proposed injunction. Trutanich, whose unsuccessful run for district attorney in June left him $112,000 in debt, has filed a request for a civil injunction to prevent ticket resellers from hawking their wares within 100 yards of Staples Center, Dodger Stadium, the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and other sports and music venues.
OPINION
August 21, 2012
Re "Stomping on scalpers," Editorial, Aug. 12 In an editorial the day before the piece on scalpers appeared, The Times criticized the state for moving too slowly to reduce our prison population. I believe The Times was correct. However, in the face of prison and jail overcrowding, The Times suggests that illegal ticket scalping should be solved through harsher but no longer available criminal sanctions. This type of quality-of-life crime by repeat offenders no longer results in meaningful jail time.
OPINION
August 12, 2012
Re "L.A. hardens tactics against scalpers," Aug. 10 If a home buyer flips a property, he or she is considered a smart investor. Similarly, a scalper invests capital in buying tickets, and this capital has been at risk. For this he earns a return. What's wrong with that? If an investigation into scalping is in order, why not investigate the owners of the sports teams, who actively collude to restrict the number of teams, the number of games played and the TV broadcasts? In effect, they scalp the public with high ticket prices.
OPINION
August 12, 2012
Unable to stop ticket scalpers from repeatedly violating city laws, City Atty. Carmen Trutanich has filed suit to bar 17 of them - and potentially many more - from setting foot anywhere near five of Los Angeles' most popular sports and concert venues. The injunction sought by Trutanich is the same forceful tool he has used repeatedly against a growing list of targets, including violent criminal gangs, graffiti "taggers" and drug dealers on skid row. And while critics complain about injunctions' effect on civil liberties, there are times when they're appropriate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2012 | By Andrew Blankstein and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
For years, prosecutors have used court injunctions to prevent gang members, drug dealers and even graffiti vandals from congregating in certain areas. But now, the L.A. city attorney's office wants to use the powerful legal tool on a decidedly different target: ticket scalpers. City Atty. Carmen Trutanich filed court papers this week asking a judge to bar 17 prolific ticket scalpers from being anywhere near Dodger Stadium, Staples Center, the Nokia Theatre, the Coliseum and USC's Galen Center.
SPORTS
June 8, 2012
Ticket brokers are the ultimate lowlifes. There was a huge difference in fan support between Game 3 and 4. The reason is real fans could not afford to see their beloved Kings. The only people willing to pay ridiculous prices are fly-by-night observers who thought it was the in thing to do. When ticket prices escalate to upward of 10 times the face value, there is a problem. I certainly hope all the idiots who paid as much for one single ticket as it would've cost to purchase season seats got their money's worth.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1990
After reading Philips' article, I have a simple solution that doesn't involve litigation and could be implemented tomorrow: festival seating or no seating on the arena (floor) level. This would be a sure way of stopping the scalpers or at least lowering their profits. It's done throughout Europe. GORDON S. FUSIK Long Beach
SPORTS
October 19, 1985
I slip into my seat with two out in the bottom of the third, dash out late in the seventh with the score tied, and turn a mean profit selling my playoff and World Series tickets to legalized scalpers. Who am I? I am the ultimate embarrassment to the sports world--the Los Angeles Dodger season-ticket holder. J. S. JOHNSON Manhattan Beach
BUSINESS
March 14, 2012 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Brusque with a 2-day-old stubble and a cigarette dangling from his lip, Zhao Xin is the last guy you'd want waiting on you at the Apple store Genius Bar. But if you need to get your hands on a genuine iPhone immediately, Zhao is your man. Skimpy supplies of the Apple Inc. smartphone gave rise to scalpers like Zhao who prowl the perimeter of the company's flagship store here touting their wares to anyone within earshot. By hoarding and smuggling in the devices, they satisfied an unmet demand and charged a premium.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2012 | By Jonathan Kaiman and John Lee, Los Angeles Times
Apple Inc. halted the release of its iPhone 4S at retail stores in Beijing and Shanghai on Friday after a riot almost started outside one of its stores in the Chinese capital. An angry mob of people who had waited overnight pelted the store with eggs and assaulted a mall manager after employees refused to open as scheduled. Carolyn Wu, an Apple spokeswoman in Beijing, said the company's five authorized stores in China had sold out of the iPhone 4S and that the Beijing store was prevented from opening because of the large crowd.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|