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Scandia

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REAL ESTATE
August 4, 1985 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Singer Diana Ross has sold her Beverly Hills house to James Burrows, director/producer of the hit TV comedy "Cheers." (Burrows is the son of the late Pulitzer Prize-winning Broadway musical author Abe Burrows, who co-wrote the book for "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.") Ross listed her 6,833-square-foot house with five bedrooms--and nine baths, yet!--for $2.5 million, but it sold--according to public records--for $1.75 million.
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NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
A cluster of four Glassell Park houses wrapping up construction and opening to the public for the first time this weekend will be another indicator of how much modern design can help move L.A. real estate in a recovering market. The hillside houses, on a part of Scandia Way that The Times classifies as Glassell Park but that the developer is marketing as Eagle Rock, were designed by L.A. architect Donald Holtz . During a walk-through of one house on Wednesday, Holtz pointed out elements that the Dwell generation is used to seeing in custom modern homes, starting with a living room that reads “loft” thanks to windows stacked under a 21-foot-ceiling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1987 | COLMAN ANDREWS
Yet another veteran L.A. restaurant--another of those resolutely untrendy, immensely popular, home-away-from-home sort of places that everybody takes for granted until it suddenly disappears--is about to close its doors forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1999 | ANGELA PETTERA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Whole New Legacy: After sitting empty for a decade, the Sunset Strip space that used to house Scandia is coming back to life. Three and a half years ago, the Rennick family, which owns the building, hooked up with Danna Moore, who pitched the idea of a restaurant with six dining venues and brought in partners Christopher Moore and Katherine Howard. Legacy, as the new place is called, is scheduled to open in about a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1992
Call me outdated, but when I saw your cover stories I thought immediately of those great traditional L.A. restaurants Scandia, Cock 'N Bull, Tail of the Cock, the Brown Derbys, Perino's, Smith Bros. Fish Shanty, Captain's Table, Le Restaurant, all long gone. Then I realized you were lamenting all the nouveau trendy restaurants of the '80s, so expensive and so status-conscious they couldn't even last a decade. More than any of them, I miss the above and the Hungry Tigers, the Frascatis, the Diamond Jims, the Carolina Pines and, way back in the middle ages, Mike Lyman's.
FOOD
October 6, 1994
Thank you for the articles on all the restaurants that only remain in our memories ("Remembrances of Restaurants Past," Sept. 29). The delicious hot fudge sundae with the macaroon wrapped in paper, tucked in the side of your dish at Wil Wright's for dessert. For dinner, Scandia was my mother and father's favorite restaurant. The captain and hostess were not as stiff as the article presents them, by any means. When our family walked in, the hostess, Eva, and the captain, Leonard, were warm, welcoming and glad to see our family.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1987 | Compiled by Kathie Jenkins
If the wining is as important to you as the dining, here are some restaurants you may want to consider. Just remember: If you're going to drink, don't drive. AURORA RISTORANTE (1341 S. Euclid St., Fullerton (714) 738-0272). Aurora not only does the classics proud, it features an arkful of eccentricities such as buffalo, alligator and wild game birds. The hot wilted spinach salad is sublime and there is a perfectly dressed Caesar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1986 | DOUG SMITH
The news came as no surprise--but still with a prick of pathos--that the Tail O' the Cock restaurant is going to be demolished next year to make way for a shopping center. In a community that has exhausted its land and is still impelled by the urge to build, there was no prospect of survival for a sprawling, single-story restaurant with slightly British pretensions on the prime intersection of Ventura and Coldwater Canyon boulevards.
FOOD
December 1, 1988 | ROSE DOSTI, Times Staff Writer
Remember Scandia? Next question. Want to hear how it's doing? Fine, sort of, but it could be better considering the food, prices, ambiance and service bargain it is today. In fact, I can think of no better place for holiday celebrations than Scandia. It's all dressed up now, spruced up and ready to go. A rallying cry is in the air. Raymond L. MacCurtin, executive chef of Scandia's heyday success, is back. The place has been gussied up with new paint, polish and shine.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1991 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
That Scandia sign on North La Cienega--isn't it the same red sign that used to sit over the famous Scandia on Sunset Boulevard? What's it doing there? Has Scandia reopened? I asked my restaurant-knowledgeable friends, but nobody knew anything about it. They said things like: "The original Scandia closed down, didn't it?" And: "It can't be the same people who own it, can it?"
FOOD
October 6, 1994
Thank you for the articles on all the restaurants that only remain in our memories ("Remembrances of Restaurants Past," Sept. 29). The delicious hot fudge sundae with the macaroon wrapped in paper, tucked in the side of your dish at Wil Wright's for dessert. For dinner, Scandia was my mother and father's favorite restaurant. The captain and hostess were not as stiff as the article presents them, by any means. When our family walked in, the hostess, Eva, and the captain, Leonard, were warm, welcoming and glad to see our family.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1992
Call me outdated, but when I saw your cover stories I thought immediately of those great traditional L.A. restaurants Scandia, Cock 'N Bull, Tail of the Cock, the Brown Derbys, Perino's, Smith Bros. Fish Shanty, Captain's Table, Le Restaurant, all long gone. Then I realized you were lamenting all the nouveau trendy restaurants of the '80s, so expensive and so status-conscious they couldn't even last a decade. More than any of them, I miss the above and the Hungry Tigers, the Frascatis, the Diamond Jims, the Carolina Pines and, way back in the middle ages, Mike Lyman's.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | HILARY DOLE KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Following a report that hinted Scandia was "good," we drove one midweek night out to the Channel Islands Harbor, not knowing whether we would find a small sandwich shop or a lavish, all-you-can-eat smorgasbord. Instead, we found ourselves following a formally dressed young maitre d' into a splendidly plush dining room, filled with brocade banquettes and leather and wood chairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1991 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
That Scandia sign on North La Cienega--isn't it the same red sign that used to sit over the famous Scandia on Sunset Boulevard? What's it doing there? Has Scandia reopened? I asked my restaurant-knowledgeable friends, but nobody knew anything about it. They said things like: "The original Scandia closed down, didn't it?" And: "It can't be the same people who own it, can it?"
FOOD
December 1, 1988 | ROSE DOSTI, Times Staff Writer
Remember Scandia? Next question. Want to hear how it's doing? Fine, sort of, but it could be better considering the food, prices, ambiance and service bargain it is today. In fact, I can think of no better place for holiday celebrations than Scandia. It's all dressed up now, spruced up and ready to go. A rallying cry is in the air. Raymond L. MacCurtin, executive chef of Scandia's heyday success, is back. The place has been gussied up with new paint, polish and shine.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1987 | Compiled by Kathie Jenkins
If the wining is as important to you as the dining, here are some restaurants you may want to consider. Just remember: If you're going to drink, don't drive. AURORA RISTORANTE (1341 S. Euclid St., Fullerton (714) 738-0272). Aurora not only does the classics proud, it features an arkful of eccentricities such as buffalo, alligator and wild game birds. The hot wilted spinach salad is sublime and there is a perfectly dressed Caesar.
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
A cluster of four Glassell Park houses wrapping up construction and opening to the public for the first time this weekend will be another indicator of how much modern design can help move L.A. real estate in a recovering market. The hillside houses, on a part of Scandia Way that The Times classifies as Glassell Park but that the developer is marketing as Eagle Rock, were designed by L.A. architect Donald Holtz . During a walk-through of one house on Wednesday, Holtz pointed out elements that the Dwell generation is used to seeing in custom modern homes, starting with a living room that reads “loft” thanks to windows stacked under a 21-foot-ceiling.
FOOD
April 27, 1989 | ROSE DOSTI, Times Staff Writer
There is a choice group of dishes from restaurants that have left an indelible mark on the Los Angeles culinary scene. They are dishes you would drop a date with a best friend to taste. They are dishes with an illustrious past and bright future. They possess a bold character and unmistakable charm--along, of course, with exceptional flavor. They have survived the test of time. They are, in fact, a class unto themselves, defying description. Each dish stands on its own, as proud of having originated in a diner as in a chi-chi bistro.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1987 | COLMAN ANDREWS
Yet another veteran L.A. restaurant--another of those resolutely untrendy, immensely popular, home-away-from-home sort of places that everybody takes for granted until it suddenly disappears--is about to close its doors forever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1986 | DOUG SMITH
The news came as no surprise--but still with a prick of pathos--that the Tail O' the Cock restaurant is going to be demolished next year to make way for a shopping center. In a community that has exhausted its land and is still impelled by the urge to build, there was no prospect of survival for a sprawling, single-story restaurant with slightly British pretensions on the prime intersection of Ventura and Coldwater Canyon boulevards.
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