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September 28, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the United States, for the first time, the wives of both major-party presidential candidates are women with careers and accomplishments of their own, each a grade-grinding graduate of an Ivy League law school. With 58.9% of women in the work force, Americans might be expected to applaud the end of the political-helpmate era. But no. First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton continues to be an object of suspicion and even loathing for some members of the press and public.
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NEWS
September 28, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the United States, for the first time, the wives of both major-party presidential candidates are women with careers and accomplishments of their own, each a grade-grinding graduate of an Ivy League law school. With 58.9% of women in the work force, Americans might be expected to applaud the end of the political-helpmate era. But no. First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton continues to be an object of suspicion and even loathing for some members of the press and public.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2004 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
Step into Camp Cool. That's what John Keddie calls the upstairs room in his airy Pacific Beach house that serves as the literal and philosophical heart of Vintage Vantage. The fledgling online company (vintagevantage.com) sells original T-shirts designed by Keddie and his wife, Heather, that look and feel like the worn-in, offbeat treasures unearthed at the local secondhand shop.
SCIENCE
March 18, 2013 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Long after learning that a troubling reading on a screening mammogram was just a false alarm, women continued suffering negative psychological effects, researchers in Denmark have reported. Six months after hearing they did not have breast cancer, women with these false positives experienced changes in "existential values" and "inner calmness" as great as for women who had cancer. They reported having more anxiety, feeling more pessimistic and having more problems with their sleep and sex lives - as well as other negative outcomes - than women who had normal mammograms.
HEALTH
December 20, 2004 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
It's become a popular notion that chronic stress can have a wide range of medical consequences, from raising your blood pressure to causing cancer. And this has prompted many Americans to attempt to "de-stress" by taking up such practices as meditation, running or yoga.
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