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NEWS
December 30, 1987 | Reuters
Pope John Paul II will make a tour of the five predominantly Lutheran countries of Scandinavia in 1989, the first papal visit ever to the region, a spokesman for the Roman Catholic Church said today. The Pope's trip to Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland and Iceland will probably take place in June, 1989, and last about 10 days, the spokesman said.
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NATIONAL
May 2, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The National Transportation Safety Board has launched an investigation into why two airplanes clipped each other on a taxiway as they readied for takeoff at Newark Liberty International Airport on Wednesday. The probe, announced Thursday in a Twitter message from the agency, was expected after the planes came in contact, leaving one with a portion of its left wing ripped away. No injuries were reported in the incident. According to the Federal Aviation Administration, a Scandinavian Airlines plane's left wing clipped the tail of an ExpressJet flight while the craft were on a taxiway at about 7:24 p.m. Wednesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2003 | Natalie Nichols, Special to The Times
Pop fans have recently come to equate Scandinavia with such wild 'n' woolly punk acts as Sweden's the Hives, but Denmark's cartoonishly kinetic new-wave pop group Junior Senior showed another facet of that region's sonic output during its L.A. debut at the Viper Room on Wednesday. Back in their homeland, guitarist-singer Jesper Mortensen ("Junior") and vocalist Jeppe Laursen ("Senior") are label mates of apocalyptically minimal duo the Raveonettes. In the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
A smart company called MHz Networks has come up with the shrewd idea of presenting to American audiences the European TV movies that have been made from the works of great modern European detective novels. The company has already done so much  that it is best to look at its output region by region, and this week Scandinavian detectives get the nod. The first of the great Nordic detectives was Sweden's Martin Beck, created by Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo, and MHz brings us multiple episodes of “Beck,” TV stories inspired by those memorable novels.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1991
Regarding "This Is No Gag--They Swear" (Sept. 8): In an early promo for "The Adventures of Mark & Brian," the wacky pair were talking about their upcoming show, and as they carried on, subtitles appeared at the bottom of the screen in some strange, Scandinavian-looking language. Har, har! What a couple of funny dudes. Really clever and inventive, right? But wait! The night before I saw the promo, KCOP Channel 13 aired that cult-classic film "Monty Python and the Holy Grail," in which subtitles were used in the opening credits to comic effect.
TRAVEL
January 15, 2006
''IN the heart of Casablanca, Morocco, you will find a small, traditional restaurant where you can order the most delicious roast chicken served with homemade French fries, salad and spicy rice all for a very reasonable price -- less than $5. The owner is fluent in English." Saladdin, Place Marechal, 23 Rue Jontil, Casablanca, Morocco; 011-212-67-93-8914. NANCY JAUREGUI Anaheim Scandinavia: Uncle Sven, is that you?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1998
I recently returned from Scandinavia, where just about everyone on the streets, from policemen to the few panhandlers, speaks, writes and reads a credible English. In Sweden, pupils are exposed to English in school as a second language. In Denmark, Norway and Finland, it's the third language taught in classrooms. Perhaps the Los Angeles Unified School District should investigate the Scandinavian educational approach to teaching English as a second and third language. SEAMON GLASS Santa Monica
NATIONAL
May 2, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The National Transportation Safety Board has launched an investigation into why two airplanes clipped each other on a taxiway as they readied for takeoff at Newark Liberty International Airport on Wednesday. The probe, announced Thursday in a Twitter message from the agency, was expected after the planes came in contact, leaving one with a portion of its left wing ripped away. No injuries were reported in the incident. According to the Federal Aviation Administration, a Scandinavian Airlines plane's left wing clipped the tail of an ExpressJet flight while the craft were on a taxiway at about 7:24 p.m. Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1998
As John H. Bunzel stated in "Are Ethnic Studies Separate or Equal?" (Opinion, Nov. 8), I agree that ethnic studies, if presented in a highly intellectual and apolitical arena, have a legitimate academic and societal role. However, as a UCLA graduate who has completed a handful of such courses, I am tempted to ask whether "ethnic studies" is merely a euphemism for state-sponsored indoctrination. From my experiences, there existed a clear political agenda--one that presented biased commentary in the midst of factual information.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2011
A platinum blond proponent of Scandinavian efficiency, the electro-pop singer Robyn lives by the mantra that Fembots have feelings too. At a moment when Lady Gaga found success in hugeness and epic dance beats, Robyn keeps things smaller, using club sounds to get at intimate emotional ideas while never losing a certain sass. With the excellent electronica combo Royksopp. Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave. L.A. 7 p.m. Sat. $29.50-$87.50. hollywoodbowl.com.
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
Do you know your Gucci from your Galliano? Your Levi's from your Lincoln? Brand names are part of our pop-culture psyche. But corporations and luxury brands have been known to change their names. French luxury group PPR, whose portfolio includes brands like Puma, Balenciaga and Saint Laurent, recently announced that it is officially changing its name to Kering (pronounced “caring”). Although to us the name sounds more appropriate for a Scandinavian wolf hospice or an off-brand cherry liqueur than a high-end luxury firm, the word “ker” is a Breton word that translates as “home” which, according to company Chairman and Chief Executive Francois-Henri Pinault, better reflects the company's recently narrowed focus on the apparel and accessories brands.
SCIENCE
April 27, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Analyzing DNA from four ancient skeletons and comparing it with thousands of genetic samples from living humans, a group of Scandinavian scientists reported that agriculture initially spread through Europe because farmers expanded their territory northward, not because the more primitive foragers already living there adopted it on their own. The genetic profiles of three Neolithic hunter-gatherers and one farmer who lived in the same region of...
NEWS
December 1, 2011 | By Hugh Hart, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Silence speaks elegant volumes this fall as Scandinavian filmmakers bring a spare touch to subjects that usually get presented by Hollywood in the-louder-the-better fashion. Spycraft, car chases and the apocalypse figure are dominant themes in award season contenders "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy," directed by Swedish filmmaker Tomas Alfredson; "Drive," helmed by Danish director Nicolas Winding Refn; and "Melancholia," from Denmark's melancholy auteur Lars von Trier. Like Susanne Bier, the Danish specialist in angst-fraught relationship dramas who directed last year's foreign-language Oscar winner, "In a Better World," the Northern Europeans behind these English-language features share a gift for handling deeply dysfunctional characters with dry aplomb.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2011
A platinum blond proponent of Scandinavian efficiency, the electro-pop singer Robyn lives by the mantra that Fembots have feelings too. At a moment when Lady Gaga found success in hugeness and epic dance beats, Robyn keeps things smaller, using club sounds to get at intimate emotional ideas while never losing a certain sass. With the excellent electronica combo Royksopp. Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave. L.A. 7 p.m. Sat. $29.50-$87.50. hollywoodbowl.com.
NEWS
May 24, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Travel & Deal blogger
High concentrations of volcanic ash from the Grimsvotn volcano in Iceland are wafting over northern parts of Britain and have forced the cancellation of 500 flights across Europe, the European air traffic center said Tuesday. Eurocontrol also predicted more cancellations Wednesday as the cloud drifts toward Denmark, southern Norway and southwest Sweden. But the agency also expects the number of future flights affected by the cloud will be relatively low. Airlines such as British Airways , KLM , Aer Lingus , Loganair , Ryanair and others that canceled flights Monday and Tuesday have been scrambling to keep passengers informed of operations using Twitter, Facebook and websites, telling passengers not to come to the airport if their flight has been canceled.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In "I Curse the River of Time," a quiet Pietà of a novel, a mother and son try to fill in the gaps left after a life of rare communication: Plenty of love, the tough unspoken kind, but too little communication. The mother has been married 40 years. Three sons are grown and one has died. She and her husband come and go, no longer close but full of mutual respect. She has worked in a factory for much of her adult life; has paid for the narrator of this novel, her son Arvid, to go to college.
BOOKS
September 8, 1991
If the name Knut Hamsun meant anything to me before this year, it could only have been because of something I misunderstood--perhaps a cockamamie answer to a Jeopardy question about Scandinavian physicists. I have finally figured out who he really was. I wish I had realized sooner. A few months ago, as I was preparing the afterword to the first book edition of George S. Schuyler's 1930s serial, "Black Empire," I read a letter that Schuyler wrote to W.E.B. Du Bois in 1928. While reviewing Du Bois' novel, "Dark Princess," Schuyler felt compelled to write directly to Du Bois to confess that his book "gripped me as no other has since Knut Hamsun's 'Hunger.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2004 | Rob Kendt, Special to The Times
Friedrich Durrenmatt's hilariously caustic reduction of the impassioned, often lyrical marital tragedy "Dance of Death" could more accurately be titled "Play Against Strindberg." By excising peripheral characters, trimming or sharpening dialogue, and subverting key plot points for "Play Strindberg," Durrenmatt's free adaptation mercilessly skewers the brooding Scandinavian temperament of early 20th century drama.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt
If the United States is at a loss over what to do about nuclear waste, it may be time to check out the Swedish model. A symposium at the annual meeting of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science in San Diego last week highlighted the Swedish power industry in gaining public support for a geological repository for high-level radioactive waste. The Scandinavian success comes in stark contrast to efforts in the U.S., where spent nuclear fuel rods have remained for decades in temporary storage at power plants around the country.
SPORTS
February 18, 2010 | By Grahame L. Jones, On Soccer
One would have thought that Sweden's Martin Hansson and Norway's Tom Henning Ovrebro would have learned their lessons by now. On Wednesday, in two absorbing European Champions League matches played in Portugal and Germany, the two Scandinavian referees once again were at the center of twin storms because of controversial calls that directly affected the outcome of the two round-of-16 matches. In Portugal, Hansson, already infamous for not spotting Thierry Henry's hand ball for France in its pivotal World Cup qualifier against Ireland last fall, this time allowed FC Porto to take a quick free kick only yards from the Arsenal goal.
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