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BUSINESS
November 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
EC Calls Air Fare Hikes Too Steep: The EC Commission ruled that 40 air fare increases by five European airlines last year were excessively steep. It ordered EC countries to ensure these prices were not used to calculate 1991 fares, a move that could lower fares on more than two dozen European routes. The five companies that had 1990 fare hikes disallowed are British Airways, Air France, Alitalia, Olympic Airways and Scandinavian Airline System.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Scandinavian Airline System will reduce its staff by about 3,500 over the next two years in order to cut costs by $550 million, the airline said today. The airline said its financial crisis stemmed from increasing oil prices and declining numbers of passengers in the light of terrorist threats emanating from the Persian Gulf War. SAS has canceled all departures to the Middle East and has seen a 20% decline in revenues on its European routes since December.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2003 | From Associated Press
Boeing Co. has developed plans for a 130-passenger stretch version of the 717 to compete with models from Europe's Airbus, Embraer of Brazil and Bombardier of Canada. Boeing said the proposed 717-300X, to be assembled in Long Beach, would be 14 feet longer than the 717-200 and carry about 20 more passengers. Chicago-based Boeing has offered the design to the 17 airlines in the worldwide Star Alliance, spokesman Warren Lamb said.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1988
Sir Adam Thomson, chairman and chief executive of British Caledonian Group PLC, has resigned in a move related to the airline's takeover by its larger rival British Airways PLC, Caledonian said. Three other members of Caledonian's board of directors resigned along with Thomson. In December, British Airways beat out Scandinavian Airline System in a protracted takeover battle for Caledonian.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Scandinavian airline dealt a blow to McDonnell Douglas Corp.'s proposed MD-95 jetliner program Tuesday by announcing a $1.2-billion order for 35 Boeing Co. jets. The MD-95, which McDonnell's Douglas Aircraft division plans to build in Dallas, was thought to be a strong contender for the order placed by Scandinavian Airline System (SAS). "It's disappointing," said John Thom, a Douglas spokesman. "We thought we had the right plane and offered a very competitive deal."
BUSINESS
February 6, 1992 | From Associated Press
The parent company of Continental Airlines, which flew into bankruptcy in late 1990, hopes to file a reorganization plan today that would wipe out its existing stock and give new shares to unsecured creditors. One big loser would be Scandinavian Airline System, which in 1990 entered a complicated deal that gave it a 16.8% share of Continental's common stock as it bought out Frank Lorenzo's stake in the company.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Douglas Aircraft Co., conceding its plans to build its proposed MD-95 jetliner in Dallas are not final, confirmed Friday that it is mulling whether it should do the work at its home plant in Long Beach or at another site in Texas. Long Beach officials and union leaders, meanwhile, said they're trying to convince Douglas to move production to Long Beach. The company, a unit of McDonnell Douglas Corp., has yet to launch the 100-seat aircraft because it's still awaiting sufficient initial orders.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Douglas Aircraft Co. confirmed Monday that it will soon start laying off workers at its Long Beach plant because it has yet to receive a long-awaited jetliner order from Saudi Arabia. Sources said the cutback could involve several hundred employees. Douglas, which had expected to sell the Saudis its wide-body MD-11 and its smaller MD-80 and MD-90 jetliners, said it does not yet know how many employees will be let go, and company spokesman John Thom declined to speculate on a figure.
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