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Scandinavian Airline Systems

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BUSINESS
March 14, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ
McDonnell Douglas Corp.'s proposed 100-seat commercial jetliner, the MD-95, could move closer to being formally launched today if it gets a sizable order from Scandinavian Airline Systems. Stockholm-based SAS, a longtime McDonnell customer, is expected to announce an order for perhaps 50 or more small jetliners today valued in excess of $1 billion, and the MD-95 is considered a front-runner to win all or part of the deal. Boeing Co.
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BUSINESS
March 14, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ
McDonnell Douglas Corp.'s proposed 100-seat commercial jetliner, the MD-95, could move closer to being formally launched today if it gets a sizable order from Scandinavian Airline Systems. Stockholm-based SAS, a longtime McDonnell customer, is expected to announce an order for perhaps 50 or more small jetliners today valued in excess of $1 billion, and the MD-95 is considered a front-runner to win all or part of the deal. Boeing Co.
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BUSINESS
July 19, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
U.S. airlines are joining forces with well-heeled airlines in Europe to extend their reach around the globe. The corporate parents of expansion-minded Continental Airlines, Northwest Airlines and Delta Air Lines have joined forces in recent weeks with smaller, cash-rich European airlines anxious for more American customers. The trend is expected to continue as airlines on both continents look for ways to grow.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1994 | From Reuters
Icelandair, once the hippie airline that gave thousands of 1960s Americans--including a long-haired Bill Clinton--their first taste of international travel, has changed course to carve itself a slice of the new Europe. Tiny by comparison with European and U.S. competitors, Icelandair is using its biggest advantage--a home base on an island perched halfway between the new and old worlds.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With fare wars heating up, much of the turbulence in the travel industry these days is on the ground. Reeling from a slump in travel since the Persian Gulf War began, the airlines are luring wary fliers with ticket giveaways and bargain fares that are likely to eventually widen already huge financial losses. "The fact that they are selling tickets at deep discounts--that should increase losses," said Mark Daugherty, airline industry analyst for Dean Witter in New York.
TRAVEL
February 2, 2003
The following is a list of selected national and international airlines that fly out of major cities in the United States. In some cases, an airline may not have its own mileage award program; for example, the frequent-flier phone number listed for Cathay Pacific will reach its partner, American Airlines. (Note: "ff" denotes frequent flier.) Aer Lingus (800) 474-7424 reservations/ff www.flyaerlingus.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1994 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"What airline are you flying?" is becoming a more complicated question for international travelers as U.S. and foreign carriers rush to forge global alliances. British Airways passengers from Phoenix to London begin their journey aboard a USAir jet. After buying a Northwest Airlines ticket between Amsterdam and Detroit, passengers end up with a seat on KLM Royal Dutch Airlines. American Airlines sells round trips between New York and Johannesburg--but a South African Airways jet does the flying.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Amid the whirring of sewing machines at California Sun, a firm in Los Angeles' bustling garment district, the conversation these days is about the prospect of bloodshed in the Persian Gulf. "This morning, we were talking about what will happen if there is a war," said Irma Martinez, a 42-year-old sewing machine operator from El Salvador. "We think everything will be harder; food will cost more, and work will slow down.
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