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Scandinavian Airlines Systems

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BUSINESS
October 5, 1988 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
Scandinavian Airlines System and Texas Air, the largest airline company in the United States, signed a major agreement Tuesday to coordinate their advertising, scheduling and reservations and giving SAS the right to buy up to 10% of Texas Air's stock. SAS' investment in Texas Air, which owns Eastern Airlines and Continental Airlines, will represent the first stake in a major U.S. carrier by any foreign airline. The value of 10% of Texas Air's stock at current prices would be about $58 million.
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BUSINESS
October 5, 1988 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
Scandinavian Airlines System and Texas Air, the largest airline company in the United States, signed a major agreement Tuesday to coordinate their advertising, scheduling and reservations and giving SAS the right to buy up to 10% of Texas Air's stock. SAS' investment in Texas Air, which owns Eastern Airlines and Continental Airlines, will represent the first stake in a major U.S. carrier by any foreign airline. The value of 10% of Texas Air's stock at current prices would be about $58 million.
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BUSINESS
September 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Passenger Group Names Safest Airlines: American Airlines, Delta Air Lines and Southwest Airlines are among the safest carriers in the industry, the International Airline Passengers Assn. said. The passenger group also placed British Airways, Lufthansa German Airlines and Scandinavian Airlines Systems on the list of the world's safest major carriers. The association based its rating on 10 years of data.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1986 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
McDonnell Douglas sold five of its proposed MD-11 jetliners Monday to Mitsui, a Japanese conglomerate that plans to lease out the wide-body jetliners. The $500-million sale gives McDonnell Douglas orders for a total of 14 MD-11s, a derivative of the existing DC-10 that will offer new engines, an updated cockpit, a redesigned wing and additional passenger and cargo capacity.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1990 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Continental Airlines Holdings, which considered bankruptcy two weeks ago, said Tuesday that it lost $88.3 million in the third quarter on revenue of $1.5 billion. Continental, the Houston-based parent of Continental and Eastern airlines, blamed high fuel costs and soft travel demand for much of the loss.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Taiwan's China Airlines on Friday ordered six next-generation Boeing Co. 737-800 planes and took options for nine more in a deal valued at up to $750 million, officials said. The Taiwanese flag carrier said it would take delivery of the six aircraft in 1998 between August and November, and could exercise its options on the other nine jets to take delivery in 1999 or 2000.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1991 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shares of Continental Airlines' parent company rose Tuesday after the bankrupt airline said that a group headed by the son of Texas billionaire H. Ross Perot had become the most recent investors to approach the carrier about a possible takeover. Some analysts speculated that a bidding war may break out for Continental. They remained skeptical about the success of any attempt to turn around the Houston-based airline.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1992 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the largest airline alliance in history, British Airways on Tuesday said it will invest $750 million in USAir, giving the British carrier a long-sought foothold in the U.S. market while providing its struggling partner with a badly needed financial boost. The deal, which requires the approval of the U.S. and British governments and company stockholders, would create the most formidable entry so far in a worldwide race among airlines seeking growth and profits through international expansion.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1991 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the past when Fred Tully flew to London from Los Angeles on business, British Airways was his only choice. But the Tarzana resident is about to make a change. Tully, who is in the surgical supply business, has booked a seat on American Airlines' new nonstop service between Los Angeles and London that begins later this month. "For years I have flown American domestically," says Tully, who flys about 100,000 miles annually. "British Airways has been fine, but I had no alternative.
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