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BUSINESS
January 18, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
The Transportation Security Administration is removing controversial full-body scanners made by a Torrance manufacturer, winning praise from privacy advocates and passenger-rights groups that raised questions about the health effects of the devices. Rapiscan, a unit of OSI Systems Inc., manufactured about 200 full-body scanners used by the TSA to screen passengers for hidden weapons at airports across the country. The machines generated a storm of protest because the devices use low levels of radiation to create what resembles a nude image of screened passengers.
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BUSINESS
February 24, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Samsung has unveiled the Galaxy S5, the latest version of its flagship smartphone. The device includes a fingerprint scanner and will go on sale in April. Unlike in previous years, when Samsung announced new Galaxy S models with larger and larger screens, this year the South Korean tech giant focused its presentation on a handful of key features. Samsung said the Galaxy S5 will include a fingerprint scanner that can be used to unlock the phone and make mobile payments. If this sounds familiar, that's because Apple introduced a similar feature with the iPhone 5s when that device was announced last September.
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OPINION
June 24, 2012
Re "TSA full-body scanners pose little risk, study says," June 11 The Times reported on an academic, peer-reviewed paper we coauthored. We'd like to clarify some points. Our study did not quantify the risk of backscatter security scans. The study estimated, using computer simulations, the radiation dose to individual organs. As stated in the paper, "Access to the machines for measurements and assessments is limited. " Therefore our models were based on measurements from a Johns Hopkins University study commissioned by the Transportation Security Administration, a limitation prominently discussed in our paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Eva Mendes says she's not pregnant - but she knows how the rumor might have been conceived. So she told Ellen DeGeneres on the host's talk show Wednesday. "[I]t all started because I was didn't want to go through the scanners at the airport," Mendes said. "You know those X-ray scanners, which are really creepy. They basically see you naked, right? And not only that, but there's a radiation aspect to it, so I always opt out. "I always ask for a personal pat down. " Well, that was enough to get DeGeneres going, working a bit of Valentine's Day-themed innuendo, much to Mendes' embarrassment.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2012 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
At LAX and other major airports, the Transportation Security Administration is replacing full-body scanners that have been criticized for creating potential health risks and privacy violations with a type of scanner that has not been condemned as harshly. The TSA said Monday that the move is intended to relocate faster scanners to busier airports. The TSA operates more than 700 body scanners at about 180 airports across the country. The machines were introduced at the nation's airports after Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab tried to blow up a U.S. airliner near Detroit with explosives hidden in his underwear on Christmas Day 2009.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
There's no appeasing the paranoid, it seems. The Transportation Security Administration has done away with its controversial “nude scanners,” which took full-body X-rays of passengers to ensure no one would board a plane with hidden explosives. While some found a comfort in those scanners -- why expose a plane full of people to any vulnerabilities when there's an easy solution? -- privacy advocates were unsettled that TSA employees could see nude images of passengers' bodies, even though screeners were walled off in separate rooms.
NEWS
February 23, 2013 | By Chris Erskine
In front of a crowd of more than 100, TSA spokesman Nico Melendez talked at Saturday's L.A. Times Travel Show about changes in progress and changes to come at the 11-year-old agency, a longtime hot button issue for travelers. Melendez, who has been with the TSA since its inception after 9/11, appears again Sunday in a 1 p.m. session moderated by L.A. Times travel staffer and columnist Chris Erskine. In Saturday's session, Melendez discussed and showed visuals of the upgraded full-body scanners in use across LAX since October.
NEWS
November 18, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
Full-body scanners at airport checkpoints are creating almost as much angst as the potential security threats they’re supposed to thwart. The Transportation Safety Administration insists the machines emit a low level of radiation and are safe, even for pregnant women and children. Here’s a South Florida Sun Sentinel column in which doctors say they're concerned over the machines and certain cancer risks. How much radiation do these machines emit? The American College of Radiology estimates that 1,000 scans a year equal one chest X-Ray.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2013 | By Joel Rubin and Richard Winton
Privacy rights groups on Monday filed a lawsuit against Los Angeles County's two major police departments after the agencies refused to turn over information collected by electronic license plate scanners, the suit claimed. The Los Angeles Police Department and county Sheriff's Department have made use of the plate-reading technology for several years. Typically mounted on patrol vehicles, the small cameras continuously scan license plates and check them against criminal databases in search of stolen cars and cars registered to known fugitives.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
The full-body scanners used at more than 100 airports nationwide have been tested for safety by federal agencies, but the Transportation Security Administration says it is willing to conduct additional tests to address ongoing safety fears about the radiation emitted by the machines. In the last three months, TSA chief John Pistole has changed his position - twice - on whether new tests are needed. But TSA spokesman Greg Soule said Pistole is now open to conducting a new test.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2014 | Times wire services
General Electric Co. shares fell the most in seven months after Chief Executive Jeffrey Immelt failed to deliver on a profit-margin forecast that he had been repeating for more than a year. GE shares dropped 62 cents, or 2.3%, to $26.58 on Friday after GE said profit margins at units making jet engines, medical scanners and locomotives expanded last year less than the 0.7 percentage point that Immelt set as a goal in December 2012 and affirmed last month. The misstep comes as Immelt focuses on manufacturing growth while shrinking the Fairfield, Conn., company's finance unit.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
It didn't take long for Apple's fingerprint scanner to get a follower: HTC reportedly will announce a device with a similar feature next week. The Wall Street Journal reports that on Oct. 15, the Taiwanese phone maker will unveil the HTC One Max, a larger version of its flagship smartphone that will include a fingerprint scanner much like the one Apple unveiled with the iPhone 5s last week. The new iPhone's fingerprint scanner, called the Touch ID, lets users unlock their device by simply having their fingertips scanned.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Apple unveiled its latest iPhone model Tuesday, and it'll feature a better camera than before as well as a fingerprint scanner for security. The new version of the device, called the iPhone 5S, will feature a camera with a larger sensor than before for higher-quality images. It will also use two LED lights for its flash. Besides hardware improvements, the camera will also be able to shoot in more modes than before. IPhone 5S users will be able to shoot in burst mode, to take multiple pictures in rapid succession.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
There's no appeasing the paranoid, it seems. The Transportation Security Administration has done away with its controversial “nude scanners,” which took full-body X-rays of passengers to ensure no one would board a plane with hidden explosives. While some found a comfort in those scanners -- why expose a plane full of people to any vulnerabilities when there's an easy solution? -- privacy advocates were unsettled that TSA employees could see nude images of passengers' bodies, even though screeners were walled off in separate rooms.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
The "nude scanners" are gone. The full-body scanners that used X-rays to create what look like nude images of passengers have been packed away and removed from airports across the country. The 250 or so machines were removed about two weeks ago, before the June 1 deadline set by Congress. But privacy advocates aren't satisfied, noting that the Transportation Security Administration is still using full-body scanners that employ a different technology. "They've never made a case that these scanners are better than using metal detectors or swabs to detect the use of explosives," said Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a research center that sued the TSA in 2010 over the use of all full-body scanners.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
The "nude scanners" are gone. The full-body scanners that used X-rays to create what looks like a nude image of passengers have been packed away and removed from airports across the country. The 250 or so machines were removed about two weeks ago, before the June 1 deadline set by Congress. But privacy advocates aren't satisfied, noting that the Transportation Security Administration is still using full-body scanners that employ a different technology. "They've never made a case that these scanners are better than using metal detectors or swabs to detect the use of explosives," said Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a research center that sued the TSA in 2010 over the use of all full-body scanners.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Full-body scanners used for security screening at the nation's airports do not expose passengers to dangerous levels of radiation, according to a new independent analysis of the security devices. The study by the Marquette University College of Engineering concluded that radiation from so-called backscatter scanners passes beyond a passenger's skin to reach 29 different organs - including the heart and brain. But the radiation levels are considerably lower than those of otherX-ray procedures such as mammograms, the study said.
NATIONAL
January 13, 2010 | By David G. Savage
The government has promised more and better security at airports following the near-disaster on Christmas Day, but privacy advocates are not prepared to accept the use of full-body scanners as the routine screening system. "We don't need to look at naked 8-year-olds and grandmothers to secure airplanes," Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) said last week. "I think it's a false argument to say we have to give up all of our personal privacy in order to have security." After each major terrorism incident, the balance between privacy and security tilts in favor of greater security.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2013 | By Joel Rubin and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
Privacy rights groups on Monday filed a lawsuit against Los Angeles County's two major law enforcement agencies after they refused to turn over information collected by electronic license plate scanners, the suit claimed. The Los Angeles Police Department and L.A. County Sheriff's Department have made use of the plate-reading technology for several years. Typically mounted on patrol vehicles, the small cameras continuously scan license plates and check them against criminal databases in search of stolen cars and cars registered to known fugitives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2013 | By Joel Rubin and Richard Winton
Privacy rights groups on Monday filed a lawsuit against Los Angeles County's two major police departments after the agencies refused to turn over information collected by electronic license plate scanners, the suit claimed. The Los Angeles Police Department and county Sheriff's Department have made use of the plate-reading technology for several years. Typically mounted on patrol vehicles, the small cameras continuously scan license plates and check them against criminal databases in search of stolen cars and cars registered to known fugitives.
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