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ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2009 | Lee Margulies
Talk station KABC-AM (790) is turning to a former Republican congressman rather than a former Republican senator to fill the spot being vacated by conservative commentator Bill O'Reilly. O'Reilly announced last year that he was giving up his nationally syndicated weekday radio show in the first quarter of 2009, and Westwood One, his distributor, said it had lined up former U.S. Sen. Fred Thompson (R-Tenn.) to take over. But KABC has decided instead to pick up the 2-month-old "The Joe Scarborough Show," featuring the former Florida congressman and current host of "Morning Joe" on MSNBC.
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WORLD
May 14, 2013 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
MASINLOC, Philippines - The fishermen were sailing the azure waters off the Philippine coast when Richard Caneda saw the morning sunlight glinting off a vessel "bigger than the biggest ship in the Philippine navy. " Caneda could see a red Chinese flag. The words "Chinese Maritime Surveillance" were written on the ship's side. The ship came close enough that Caneda could see crew members on deck making hand gestures as though to shoo away a fly. Caneda, who had moved from the fishing boat to a tiny skiff to haul in nets left out overnight, soon saw a large gun mounted on the ship's deck pivoting directly toward him. A helicopter whirred overhead.
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BUSINESS
March 14, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Dean A. Scarborough, chief executive of Avery Dennison Corp. of Pasadena, received compensation last year valued at $6.4 million, according to an Associated Press calculation of figures disclosed in a regulatory filing. However, much of it came in stock options that currently have little value. Scarborough received a salary of $945,000, compared with the previous year's $916,000. Scarborough received stock awards and options valued at about $4 million at the time they were granted.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Dean A. Scarborough, chief executive of Avery Dennison Corp. of Pasadena, received compensation last year valued at $6.4 million, according to an Associated Press calculation of figures disclosed in a regulatory filing. However, much of it came in stock options that currently have little value. Scarborough received a salary of $945,000, compared with the previous year's $916,000. Scarborough received stock awards and options valued at about $4 million at the time they were granted.
BOOKS
June 8, 1986
For a book about the "spicy" line of pulp magazines (Spicy Detective, Spicy Mystery, etc.) published by Culture Publications in the 1930s, I would appreciate hearing from anyone with knowledge or examples of the stories and authors of this genre. SIDNEY ALLINSON 24 Ravencliff Crescent Scarborough, Ont.
SPORTS
June 10, 1989
We in Optimist Clubs have a particular perspective on the Canadian drug inquiries. The sponsor of the track club with which Charlie Francis and the others were associated was the Scarborough Optimist Club, the Canadian twin club of my own Covina Optimist Club. Of course, the prevention of substance abuse is one of the cornerstones of our organization. The use of one of our own programs to promote the use of steroids leaves us with feelings such as those of victims of violent crimes--a sense of having your soul violated; a sense of having the sanctity of your existence being stripped from you with no means of resisting.
NEWS
October 3, 1995
Crystal Scarborough, 90, who taught celebrities and their children to swim. She came to Los Angeles in the early 1940s to train under Olympic coach Fred Cady and succeeded him as swim teacher at the Ambassador Hotel. She opened her own swim school in West Los Angeles in 1950 and ran it for 31 years. Her celebrity clients included Marilyn Monroe, Bob Dylan, Jane Fonda and Anthony Quinn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Clarence Alexander "Skip" Scarborough, 58, who shared a Grammy in songwriting for "Giving You the Best That I Got," died of cancer July 3 in Los Angeles. Scarborough lived in Owings Mills, Md., but was in the Southland to visit family and work on a songwriting project. He earned his Grammy, with co-writer Randy Holland, in 1988 for best R&B song. The single of "Giving You the Best" was recorded by Anita Baker.
SPORTS
November 17, 1986 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
On a day when the gods were restless, Thrill Show tried to restore normalcy to Hollywood Park by predictably winning the first half of Sunday's Hollywood Derby. But Sunday was a day when normalcy was vastly overmatched. One power failure later, Spellbound, a 3-year-old colt who travels with a pet goat, won the second division of the Derby at 87-1 and just as he crossed the finish line, lighting on the track and on the tote board went out for the second time.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | TED THACKREY Jr., Times Staff Writer
Auto magnate Henry Ford II, who for 35 years ran the automobile company founded by his grandfather, managing it from the brink of disaster to the top rank of industrial power, died Tuesday in a Detroit hospital. Ford, 70, who had a history of heart problems, was admitted to Cottage Hospital in suburban Grosse Pointe Farms on Sept. 9 for treatment of pneumonia he contracted while living at his country estate outside London. He was transferred Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2009 | Lee Margulies
Talk station KABC-AM (790) is turning to a former Republican congressman rather than a former Republican senator to fill the spot being vacated by conservative commentator Bill O'Reilly. O'Reilly announced last year that he was giving up his nationally syndicated weekday radio show in the first quarter of 2009, and Westwood One, his distributor, said it had lined up former U.S. Sen. Fred Thompson (R-Tenn.) to take over. But KABC has decided instead to pick up the 2-month-old "The Joe Scarborough Show," featuring the former Florida congressman and current host of "Morning Joe" on MSNBC.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2005 | Annette Haddad, Times Staff Writer
Standard Pacific Corp., an Irvine-based home builder whose operating profit rose more than 50% last year, awarded its top executive $12.5 million in compensation in 2004, a 50% increase, according to a government filing Wednesday. Chairman and Chief Executive Stephen Scarborough earned an $11.5-million bonus on top of a salary of $956,000, according to the company's proxy filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. That was considerably higher than the $8.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Clarence Alexander "Skip" Scarborough, 58, who shared a Grammy in songwriting for "Giving You the Best That I Got," died of cancer July 3 in Los Angeles. Scarborough lived in Owings Mills, Md., but was in the Southland to visit family and work on a songwriting project. He earned his Grammy, with co-writer Randy Holland, in 1988 for best R&B song. The single of "Giving You the Best" was recorded by Anita Baker.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1999 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arthur E. Svendsen, who founded Standard Pacific Corp. 33 years ago, will step down at the end of the month as chief executive of the firm he turned into one of Southern California's largest home builders, the company said Thursday. Svendsen, 76, will remain as the Costa Mesa company's chairman. He relinquishes the day-to-day duties to Stephen Scarborough, 51, who was promoted three years ago to president.
NEWS
October 3, 1995
Crystal Scarborough, 90, who taught celebrities and their children to swim. She came to Los Angeles in the early 1940s to train under Olympic coach Fred Cady and succeeded him as swim teacher at the Ambassador Hotel. She opened her own swim school in West Los Angeles in 1950 and ran it for 31 years. Her celebrity clients included Marilyn Monroe, Bob Dylan, Jane Fonda and Anthony Quinn.
BOOKS
July 14, 1991 | Charles Solomon
The late Robert Payne infuses this exceptional history with the energy and vivid characterizations of a novel. He demonstrates that the Crusades were never a simple battle between the forces of Islam and Christianity, but a complex series of conflicts involving Muslims and Latin and Greek Christians, whose mutual distrust, ignorance and hatred doomed any possibility of a stable peace.
BOOKS
November 11, 1990 | Charles Solomon
In the five years that have elapsed since the initial publication of this mean-spirited biography, Leonard Mosley has corrected some--but by no means all--of its myriad errors. The misspelled names have been fixed and some of the more glaring misstatements have been excised (animator Fred Moore no longer is listed as having worked on "Robin Hood," which was made 21 years after his death).
BUSINESS
December 17, 1999 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arthur E. Svendsen, who founded Standard Pacific Corp. 33 years ago, will step down at the end of the month as chief executive of the firm he turned into one of Southern California's largest home builders, the company said Thursday. Svendsen, 76, will remain as the Costa Mesa company's chairman. He relinquishes the day-to-day duties to Stephen Scarborough, 51, who was promoted three years ago to president.
BOOKS
November 11, 1990 | Charles Solomon
In the five years that have elapsed since the initial publication of this mean-spirited biography, Leonard Mosley has corrected some--but by no means all--of its myriad errors. The misspelled names have been fixed and some of the more glaring misstatements have been excised (animator Fred Moore no longer is listed as having worked on "Robin Hood," which was made 21 years after his death).
BOOKS
November 11, 1990 | Dick Roraback, Roraback retraced Stanley's route to Livingstone 100 years after the fact, for the International Herald Tribune
In October of 1869, a "cruel, sexist, racist, degenerate, alcoholic" newspaper publisher--"a monster in the making"--received a young reporter in his Paris offices. The reporter, painstakingly selected for one of the most harebrained commissions in the history of yellow journalism, has been variously described as a "half-mad, self-righteously brutal, paranoid, sado-masochistic professional liar." On his good days. His assignment, if he chose to accept it: to locate, in the shrouded center of an untracked continent, an itinerant, self-styled man of God, himself called "mendacious," "violent" and "a colossal failure."
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