Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsScarcity
IN THE NEWS

Scarcity

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 10, 2013 | By Mark Vandevelde
Poor people are disproportionately likely to make bad decisions, such as taking out loans they cannot repay, eating unhealthfully and dropping out of class. It is sometimes said that such people are authors of their own misfortune. Sendhil Mullainathan, a Harvard economist, and Eldar Shafir, a Princeton psychologist, have a different view in their book, "Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much," published by Times Books. They argue that lousy decisions are an effect of poverty as well as a cause.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
December 16, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
A new study that zeroed in on a single city in Michigan found that where men are scarce, youth were more likely to commit assaults. Researchers from the University of Michigan analyzed youth arrests and U.S. Census Bureau data for Flint, Mich., an industrial city whose fortunes have risen and fallen with General Motors Corp. They found that "adult male scarcity" - a low ratio of adult men to women - was closely tied to the share of households that had meager incomes or were getting government assistance, as well as the share of single parents.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1988
I pity the poor farmer who is losing his crop in the dry Midwest. I hear though that Congress is coming to the rescue. After all, the farmer who is planting his crops and loses them to the drought ought to be reimbursed for his losses. It would be unfair not to receive some help, because there are already many farmers who are getting paid for not planting their crops. But what about the poor consumer? The loss of the farmer's crops means scarcity, and higher prices for the consumer.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2013 | By Mark Vandevelde
Poor people are disproportionately likely to make bad decisions, such as taking out loans they cannot repay, eating unhealthfully and dropping out of class. It is sometimes said that such people are authors of their own misfortune. Sendhil Mullainathan, a Harvard economist, and Eldar Shafir, a Princeton psychologist, have a different view in their book, "Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much," published by Times Books. They argue that lousy decisions are an effect of poverty as well as a cause.
SCIENCE
December 16, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
A new study that zeroed in on a single city in Michigan found that where men are scarce, youth were more likely to commit assaults. Researchers from the University of Michigan analyzed youth arrests and U.S. Census Bureau data for Flint, Mich., an industrial city whose fortunes have risen and fallen with General Motors Corp. They found that "adult male scarcity" - a low ratio of adult men to women - was closely tied to the share of households that had meager incomes or were getting government assistance, as well as the share of single parents.
HOME & GARDEN
March 13, 2010
I used to look at my closet and see clothes. These days, whenever I cast my eyes upon the stacks of shoes and hangers of shirts, sweaters and jackets, I see water. Specifically, I see the "virtual water" used to make it all. It takes 569 gallons to manufacture a T-shirt, from its start in the cotton fields to its appearance on store shelves. A pair of running shoes? 1,247 gallons. Until last fall, I'd been oblivious to my "water footprint," which is defined as the total volume of freshwater that is used to produce goods and services, according to the Water Footprint Network.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2009 | Daryl H. Miller; David C. Nichols; Charlotte Stoudt; Philip Brandes
Meet America's future: A boy, 16, is in a gifted program, making excellent grades. His sister, 11, shows signs of being even smarter. These kids can be whatever they want to be. Or so we'd like to think. In demonstrating why they can't, Lucy Thurber presents a heart-wrenching portrait of a much too large segment of the population. Her play "Scarcity," given its premiere by New York's Atlantic Theater Company in 2007, is a harrowing yet miraculously tender account of promise thwarted by poverty in myriad forms -- economic, emotional, social and many others as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2009 | Reed Johnson
We shopped. Then we dropped. Then we started making culture again -- dancing on the rubble of our own excesses, stitching together art from the ragbag of our desires. Every generation or so, throughout modern American history, the culture of hardship has followed hard on the heels of the culture of consumption and prosperity.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1990
It looks like the women's movement is over. In the May 13 Art World item about the Venice Art Walk, 14 male artists are mentioned and only one woman, Lita Albuquerque. And she isn't even in Venice. MARTHA ALF Venice
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1988
Our communications editor, Louise Wagner of Irvine Temporary Housing, provided information for a small article in The Times recently in which she indicated that our food pantry was running low on food, especially cereal, rice, juice, powdered milk and flour. We have been overwhelmed by the response, not only from Irvine residents but also from residents in Anaheim, Santa Ana, San Clemente and Dana Point. Two women in an Anaheim beauty salon were discussing the article and decided to help.
NATIONAL
October 3, 2013 | By Maeve Reston
HUGO, Okla. - The nation's healthcare law was written with the residents of rural counties like Choctaw in mind. A quarter of the Oklahomans who live in the ranch country near the southeastern corner of the state are uninsured, one of many reasons their health ranks near the bottom of Oklahoma's 77 counties. But that does not mean people here want Obamacare. The state attorney general is leading one of the last state challenges against the law in federal court. The state insurance commissioner issued a sharply worded warning to federally funded "navigators" who are helping people sign up for insurance.
OPINION
August 19, 2013 | By Craig Mackey
On Aug. 7, the head of the Southern Nevada Water Authority called for federal disaster relief to address the consequences of water scarcity in the Colorado River system. On Friday, the Bureau of Reclamation announced it would be forced to cut the flow of water into Lake Mead in 2014 to a historic low. Dominoes may now fall from California to Washington, D.C. A nearly century-old body of agreements and legal decisions known as the Law of the River regulates water distribution from the Colorado River among seven states and Mexico.
WORLD
September 10, 2011 | By Benjamin Haas, Los Angeles Times
Zou Jin has one response to the gifts of mooncakes that piled up on her desk before the mid-autumn festival: "You shouldn't have. " The 30 cakes that Zou had received from her employer and various clients weeks ago sat unopened and neglected under her desk as the 31-year-old marketing manager tried to pawn them off on anyone who would take them. "They're too sweet and not healthy," she said. "I just bring them with me when I meet friends and give mooncakes to anyone who wants one. " According to custom, one is supposed to eat the cakes under the full moon on the 15th day of the eighth lunar month, which this year falls on Monday.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2010 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
The post-Christmas rush was on at malls and other retail venues, but many shoppers right away noticed something missing: the huge discounts that made end-of-holiday sales so alluring in recent years. "Beside the 'buy one, get one free' special for dress shirts, it's the same percent off that Macy's always seems to have," Alfonso Hernandez of Norwalk said Sunday morning as he left the Los Cerritos Center in Cerritos with only a pair of bluejeans. At the Jos. A. Bank men's clothing store in Huntington Beach, items such as underwear and socks that were on a "buy one, get two free" special last week were regularly priced Sunday.
WORLD
October 1, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Opium production in Afghanistan this year plunged by nearly half from 2009 levels, the United Nations said in a report Thursday. But the steep drop was attributed to a fungus that wreaked havoc on the poppy crop, not to Western anti-narcotics efforts. The scarcity dramatically drove up prices so much that officials fear poppy cultivation will prove an irresistible option in the coming year for farmers whom authorities are trying to entice to grow legal crops. And despite the blight, the premium prices probably put about as much drug money into the insurgency's coffers as previously.
HOME & GARDEN
March 13, 2010
I used to look at my closet and see clothes. These days, whenever I cast my eyes upon the stacks of shoes and hangers of shirts, sweaters and jackets, I see water. Specifically, I see the "virtual water" used to make it all. It takes 569 gallons to manufacture a T-shirt, from its start in the cotton fields to its appearance on store shelves. A pair of running shoes? 1,247 gallons. Until last fall, I'd been oblivious to my "water footprint," which is defined as the total volume of freshwater that is used to produce goods and services, according to the Water Footprint Network.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1991
The article ("Tide Rises to Impose Water Meters on Last Holdouts," April 20) on the lack of water meters in Sacramento and some surrounding towns highlights what has been a basic weakness in California water policy for many decades. Water has always been priced to consumers according to the cost of delivery alone. This was composed of capital costs and operating costs (personnel and energy principally), but never included anything for the commodity itself. This has to change. EDWARD G. LOWELL, Tarzana
OPINION
August 18, 2004
Well before the shock and pain subside, the victims of Hurricane Charley in Florida must add another worry to their list: an exorbitant increase in the cost of key building materials, principally cement, that will be needed to reconstruct their devastated towns and cities. Cement shortages that first appeared this spring in Florida (which imports about 40% of its cement, compared with a nationwide average of 20%) have now reached a critical point.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2010 | By Jill Leovy
The mysterious pelican malady that left hundreds of the birds sick and stranded along the Oregon and California coasts this winter was probably caused by a combination of bad weather and fish shortages related to El Niño, state Department of Fish and Game officials said Monday. After ruling out such potential causes as disease or marine toxins, a group of scientists from state and federal agencies, nonprofit groups and Sea World in San Diego concluded that a simple scarcity of pelican prey, such as anchovies and sardines, probably combined with winter storms to produce flocks of hungry, wet, soiled pelicans, dying on beaches or looking for handouts.
WORLD
December 18, 2009 | By Chris Kraul
Brazil's planned reentry into the satellite business next year is more than an effort to join an exclusive club and become a global player. It's part of a far-reaching defense plan to ward off potential plunderers of its immense natural resources, officials say. "In the coming era of scarcity, we're going to have to defend what we've got with our claws, our feet and our weapons," said a consultant to the Defense Ministry who requested anonymity because...
Los Angeles Times Articles
|