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Scarecrows

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NEWS
September 20, 2012 | By Rosemary McClure
More than 200 entries are beginning to get stuffed in Cambria, where the upcoming Scarecrow Festival is a fall highlight. Residents like to say it's the final straw of the season. The annual event, introduced by the Cambria Historical Society in 2009, features a cast of whimsical scarecrows that spend the month of October decorating Moonstone Beach and the East and West villages of this Central California coastal community.     “This isn't the kind of event that could happen just anywhere,” said Sue Robinson, festival co-chair.
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NEWS
September 26, 2013 | By Karin Klein
“The Scarecrow,” a short animated video put out by Chipotle Mexican Grill, seems part Pixar, part Tim Burton, accompanied by a creepily melancholy version of the song “Pure Imagination” from the first Willy Wonka movie. At first it appears that the “pure imagination” is us kidding ourselves that our food is made of, you know, food, or something that we would recognize as food. A “100% beef-ish” product is extruded from a factory into children's lunches and the packages that shoppers put in their supermarket carts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1997 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rafael Rodriguez Aranda's creations were born of necessity. Hungry birds were pecking the seeds from strawberries growing in the Pinnacle Farms fields near the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station, leaving the berries scarred, pocked and unfit for picking. So Rodriguez, a field hand, went to work. Using branches and twigs, plastic scraps and found pieces of clothing, Rodriguez created a small detachment of stick soldiers.
NEWS
September 20, 2012 | By Rosemary McClure
More than 200 entries are beginning to get stuffed in Cambria, where the upcoming Scarecrow Festival is a fall highlight. Residents like to say it's the final straw of the season. The annual event, introduced by the Cambria Historical Society in 2009, features a cast of whimsical scarecrows that spend the month of October decorating Moonstone Beach and the East and West villages of this Central California coastal community.     “This isn't the kind of event that could happen just anywhere,” said Sue Robinson, festival co-chair.
NEWS
November 22, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Garth Brooks entered the national sales chart at No. 1 for the seventh time Wednesday with what he has described as his last album, but he didn't match his huge Garthian numbers of the past. Brooks' "Scarecrow" sold 466,000 copies during its first week in the stores, which is a big step up from the 262,000 for Brooks' 1999 pop-rock project, "In the Life of Chris Gaines," according to SoundScan. The figure, however, is far behind the 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1989 | LESLIE HERZOG
People visiting Balboa Island typically stroll beside the waters of the Grand Canal or window-shop down Marine Avenue. But now, many detour to the alley between the two walkways, where scarecrows outside of houses and shops compete this week in the first annual Balboa Island Alley Scarecrow Contest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1996 | JEFF McDONALD
Dozens of scarecrows line the sunflower fields at the Pumpkin Patch, both scaring and enticing children on the hunt for the great pumpkin. The display, made up of contest entries, was the brainchild of Tom and Arlene Leonard, who own the business on Ventura Boulevard, just north of the Edwards Theaters multiplex in Camarillo. "The children absolutely love them," said Arlene Leonard. "The little ones are afraid, but they think they're very interesting."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2001 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Going the ancient alchemist's quest one better, Percy MacKaye's "The Scarecrow" at Pacific Resident Theatre brilliantly explores the transmutation of base matter into something even more precious than gold: the human soul. Based on "Feathertop," a macabre Nathaniel Hawthorne tale about a sentient scarecrow given human form, MacKaye's 1911 play extended the sardonic focus of its source to embrace the extremes of experience--spooky, romantic, hilarious and tragic.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1988 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
Like bees in a garden, members of the Scarecrows and Burning Tree have been flitting in and out of each other's bands for several years. This musical cross-pollination has been fruitful. Today, the two bands, with roots in Orange County and neighboring Cerritos, are showing promise with gritty, blues-based rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1987 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
To have become another nation's "most popular film" isn't necessarily a virtue, as audiences for "The Man From Snowy River" will be the first to remember. But "Scarecrow" (Los Feliz Theater), which was the Soviet Union's biggest hit in 1986, is a beauty. Made in 1983 and another of the films dislodged by glasnost from its place on a shelf, "Scarecrow" is all the more interesting as a success story since its theme is staunch personal integrity in the face of mass opposition.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2009 | Tim Rutten
The novels and short stories we conveniently pigeonhole as "genre fiction" often are the tripwires of our literature's social consciousness. It's unsurprising, therefore, that the first fictional work to take the newspaper industry's agonizing decline as its backdrop is a mystery, nor that its author, Michael Connelly, is a onetime crime reporter who spent the last years of his print career at the Los Angeles Times.
NEWS
August 31, 2008 | Shannon Dininny, Associated Press
It's an apt name for a predator brought in to scare away pests: Chase. Diving and soaring over a southeast Washington blueberry patch, the aplomado falcon chases pesky starlings and sparrows to prevent them from feasting on the ripe fruit. Farmer Jim Lott smiles as he watches the bird work. Lott is one of 17 farmers nationwide who have signed up for a program, approved late last year by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, that allows the use of predator birds to control pest birds that damage or forage on crops.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2008 | Leslie S. Klinger, Special to The Times
Mystery AND detection have been popular stage themes since "Oedipus Rex." Hamlet, for instance, took several acts to figure out who murdered his father. In the 19th century, melodramas that featured criminals, crime and the forces of justice flourished in England and America, often based on real cases. In 1863, Tom Taylor's "The Ticket-of -Leave Man" (featuring Hawkshaw the detective) was extremely successful in both countries, followed by adaptations of works of Dickens and Wilkie Collins.
BOOKS
January 11, 2004 | Tom Nolan, Tom Nolan is the author of "Ross Macdonald: A Biography."
If viewers today remember the work of actor Jackie Coogan (who died in 1984 at the age of 69), odds are that they know him as Uncle Fester, the bald and ghoulish-looking cast member of the 1960s TV series "The Addams Family." Few but film scholars recall Coogan's huge success as an angel-faced child performer in the silent-movie era, star of such films as "Peck's Bad Boy" and "Oliver Twist" (with Lon Chaney as Fagin). At the age of 9, Jackie Coogan was the No.
BOOKS
March 24, 2002 | JOHN SIMON, John Simon is the theater critic for New York magazine and music critic for The New Leader. His most recent book is "Dreamers of Dreams: Essays on Poets and Poetry."
The 1960s and early 1970s were heady times for film criticism. In colleges and universities, in cafes, bars, movie theater lobbies and surrounding sidewalks, movies were the subject of heated debates. Neither moviegoing nor movie reviewing was new, but youthful hordes--uncomfortable with literature and not yet enslaved by television--found something to get excited about in the movies.
NEWS
November 22, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Garth Brooks entered the national sales chart at No. 1 for the seventh time Wednesday with what he has described as his last album, but he didn't match his huge Garthian numbers of the past. Brooks' "Scarecrow" sold 466,000 copies during its first week in the stores, which is a big step up from the 262,000 for Brooks' 1999 pop-rock project, "In the Life of Chris Gaines," according to SoundScan. The figure, however, is far behind the 1.
NEWS
January 16, 1987 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Ray Bolger, the angular, disjointed hoofer whose crackling voice and lilting smile made him a favorite of film fans and theatergoers for nearly 60 years, died Thursday. The last survivor of that dedicated and desperate band of travelers who made filmdom's legendary journey down the Yellow Brick Road to see "The Wizard of Oz" was 83 and died at a Los Angeles nursing home of cancer, family spokesman Barry Greenberg said.
NEWS
September 26, 2013 | By Karin Klein
“The Scarecrow,” a short animated video put out by Chipotle Mexican Grill, seems part Pixar, part Tim Burton, accompanied by a creepily melancholy version of the song “Pure Imagination” from the first Willy Wonka movie. At first it appears that the “pure imagination” is us kidding ourselves that our food is made of, you know, food, or something that we would recognize as food. A “100% beef-ish” product is extruded from a factory into children's lunches and the packages that shoppers put in their supermarket carts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2001 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Going the ancient alchemist's quest one better, Percy MacKaye's "The Scarecrow" at Pacific Resident Theatre brilliantly explores the transmutation of base matter into something even more precious than gold: the human soul. Based on "Feathertop," a macabre Nathaniel Hawthorne tale about a sentient scarecrow given human form, MacKaye's 1911 play extended the sardonic focus of its source to embrace the extremes of experience--spooky, romantic, hilarious and tragic.
NEWS
June 5, 2000 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, Ronald Brownstein's column appears in this space every Monday
Life, John Lennon once said, is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans. In that sense, at least, the presidential race is a lot like life. There's still a tendency in both parties, and much of the media, to plan as though the presidential race really begins on Labor Day, when Americans supposedly put down the suntan lotion and pick up the candidates' position papers.
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