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Scarlet Fever

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HEALTH
February 19, 2001 | SANDRA G. BOODMAN, WASHINGTON POST
It's one of those notes sent home from school that causes shivers of alarm: a case of scarlet fever, a "highly contagious" disease that causes a telltale bright red sandpapery rash, has been reported in your child's classroom. Even though scarlet fever conjures up visions of serious illness--which it was more than half a century ago, before penicillin was developed--today the illness is uncommon and, if treated, not serious.
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NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
More than a century after she went blind, a new study casts doubt on how bright, blue-eyed “Little House on the Prairie” older sister Mary Ingalls lost her vision. Using medical papers from the 19 th century, unpublished family journals and old newspaper clippings, medical historians claim it was viral meningoencephalitis that destroyed Ingalls' vision in 1879, not the scarlet fever that  wreaked havoc on families across the American frontier. They make their case for the new diagnosis in a study published in Monday's edition of the journal Pediatrics.
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NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
More than a century after she went blind, a new study casts doubt on how bright, blue-eyed “Little House on the Prairie” older sister Mary Ingalls lost her vision. Using medical papers from the 19 th century, unpublished family journals and old newspaper clippings, medical historians claim it was viral meningoencephalitis that destroyed Ingalls' vision in 1879, not the scarlet fever that  wreaked havoc on families across the American frontier. They make their case for the new diagnosis in a study published in Monday's edition of the journal Pediatrics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
For social historian and critic Paul Fussell, the most enduring moments of truth came as a 20-year-old platoon leader in France during World War II. German shrapnel tore up his back and thigh. The blood and guts of fellow soldiers were spewed on him. His staff sergeant died in his arms. He realized there was nothing romantic about war, only mud, cold, death, outrage and fear. "The war," Fussell told the Washington Post decades later, "is behind everything I do," beginning with his book "The Great War and Modern Memory," a classic 1975 critique of art and literature after World War I that showed how that conflict forever changed Western society and culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1990 | CAROLINE DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The same bacteria that commonly cause relatively innocuous cases of strep throat in school-age children and young adults appears to be evolving into a menacing, more virulent form. In recent years, it has produced a severe and potentially lethal--though rare--infection, most often in adults. The ubiquitous strain of bacteria known as Group A streptococcus causes the pneumonia that swiftly killed Muppeteer Jim Henson in May.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | Clipboard researched by Susan Davis Greene / Los Angeles Times; Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
Each week the Orange County Public Health Department reports to the state the incidence of various infectious diseases in the county. The following table details a selection of these afflictions for March, the most recent month for which information is available: NUMBER OF CASES March Current Previous Disease 1989 Year to Date Year to Date Acquired Immune 32 86 78 Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Campylobacter 13 35 68 Lapse of consciousness 142 342 442 (non-alcohol related) Giardiasis 41 114 79 Gonococcal infection 162 541 736 Hepatitis A 55 125 98 Hepatitis B 69 136 94 Lead poisoning 13 54 218 Measles (rubeola)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1986
Nancy Peterson Walter's letter brought back some old memories that were tucked away in my mind all these years. I lived in Chicago in the summer of 1948. That was my last summer in elementary school. I remember not going to the beach or any other crowded public place. I remember having to rest every afternoon for at least an hour. I remember quarantines. There were quarantines for everything--mumps, measles, scarlet fever, etc. I remember when a cousin came down with scarlet fever, his brother was visiting our home and could not return home until his brother recovered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
For social historian and critic Paul Fussell, the most enduring moments of truth came as a 20-year-old platoon leader in France during World War II. German shrapnel tore up his back and thigh. The blood and guts of fellow soldiers were spewed on him. His staff sergeant died in his arms. He realized there was nothing romantic about war, only mud, cold, death, outrage and fear. "The war," Fussell told the Washington Post decades later, "is behind everything I do," beginning with his book "The Great War and Modern Memory," a classic 1975 critique of art and literature after World War I that showed how that conflict forever changed Western society and culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Re-Discoveries An occasional look at classic reissues? The Tree by John Fowles with a new introduction by Barry Lopez (Ecco: 94 pp., $13.99 paper) "The key to my fiction," wrote Fowles in 1979 when this essay was first published, "lies in my relationship with nature ? I might almost have said, for reasons I will explain, in trees. " "The Tree" is part memoir, part explanation and part warning, one of the most beautiful, succinct and prescient pieces of writing we have.
NEWS
January 4, 2001 | LINDA HALES, WASHINGTON POST
Looking for a way to start the new millennium in style? Leave the holiday decorations up. Red isn't just for Christmas anymore. Call the color scarlet, persimmon or poppy. There's little argument that any shade close to a ripe tomato red will reflect the mood of the moment. "We all need to be warmed up," says Marian McEvoy, editor in chief of House Beautiful magazine. "We need to be cheered up." Color has long been the design world's way of telegraphing mood.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Re-Discoveries An occasional look at classic reissues? The Tree by John Fowles with a new introduction by Barry Lopez (Ecco: 94 pp., $13.99 paper) "The key to my fiction," wrote Fowles in 1979 when this essay was first published, "lies in my relationship with nature ? I might almost have said, for reasons I will explain, in trees. " "The Tree" is part memoir, part explanation and part warning, one of the most beautiful, succinct and prescient pieces of writing we have.
HEALTH
February 19, 2001 | SANDRA G. BOODMAN, WASHINGTON POST
It's one of those notes sent home from school that causes shivers of alarm: a case of scarlet fever, a "highly contagious" disease that causes a telltale bright red sandpapery rash, has been reported in your child's classroom. Even though scarlet fever conjures up visions of serious illness--which it was more than half a century ago, before penicillin was developed--today the illness is uncommon and, if treated, not serious.
NEWS
January 4, 2001 | LINDA HALES, WASHINGTON POST
Looking for a way to start the new millennium in style? Leave the holiday decorations up. Red isn't just for Christmas anymore. Call the color scarlet, persimmon or poppy. There's little argument that any shade close to a ripe tomato red will reflect the mood of the moment. "We all need to be warmed up," says Marian McEvoy, editor in chief of House Beautiful magazine. "We need to be cheered up." Color has long been the design world's way of telegraphing mood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1990 | CAROLINE DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The same bacteria that commonly cause relatively innocuous cases of strep throat in school-age children and young adults appears to be evolving into a menacing, more virulent form. In recent years, it has produced a severe and potentially lethal--though rare--infection, most often in adults. The ubiquitous strain of bacteria known as Group A streptococcus causes the pneumonia that swiftly killed Muppeteer Jim Henson in May.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | Clipboard researched by Susan Davis Greene / Los Angeles Times; Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
Each week the Orange County Public Health Department reports to the state the incidence of various infectious diseases in the county. The following table details a selection of these afflictions for March, the most recent month for which information is available: NUMBER OF CASES March Current Previous Disease 1989 Year to Date Year to Date Acquired Immune 32 86 78 Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Campylobacter 13 35 68 Lapse of consciousness 142 342 442 (non-alcohol related) Giardiasis 41 114 79 Gonococcal infection 162 541 736 Hepatitis A 55 125 98 Hepatitis B 69 136 94 Lead poisoning 13 54 218 Measles (rubeola)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1986
Nancy Peterson Walter's letter brought back some old memories that were tucked away in my mind all these years. I lived in Chicago in the summer of 1948. That was my last summer in elementary school. I remember not going to the beach or any other crowded public place. I remember having to rest every afternoon for at least an hour. I remember quarantines. There were quarantines for everything--mumps, measles, scarlet fever, etc. I remember when a cousin came down with scarlet fever, his brother was visiting our home and could not return home until his brother recovered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1997
Dr. Charles F. Code, 87, physiologist who first established the role of histamine in allergic reactions. His research led to the development of antihistamine medicines. Associated throughout his career with the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., Code went there as a child suffering from scarlet fever and then polio. Overcoming physical obstacles, the Canadian-born Code earned degrees from the University of Manitoba and the University of Minnesota and joined Mayo as a clinical fellow in 1934.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
You name it, Donald Sutherland has had it. Polio, rheumatic fever, hepatitis, an appendectomy, pneumonia, scarlet fever. "And spinal meningitis," the actor said. "I died. . . . " A reporter chuckled. Sutherland looked perturbed. "Yes. I died. For four or five seconds," he said. Sutherland overcame the bout of meningitis and says his experience with disease since childhood left him with a deep appreciation of the medical profession.
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