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Scarlet Letter

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December 18, 2004 | From Associated Press
The oldest known copy of Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter" was auctioned for $545,100, a record price for an American 19th century literary work, Christie's auction house said. The pre-sale estimate was between $200,000 and $300,000 for 144 pages of a printed proof of the classic novel. The manuscript was bought Thursday by an American book dealer who requested anonymity, Christie's New York spokeswoman Bendetta Roux said.
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OPINION
November 16, 2013
Re "Uh, your character is showing," Opinion, Nov. 12 Jonah Goldberg nails it: Teenagers must grapple with their digital identities when trying to stand out in college admissions. But we should consider these same issues regarding future employers and others. How you use social media can be a reflection of who you are. The old way of Googling someone to see what you can dig up ahead of an interview (or a date) has given way to cursory searches and reviews of social feeds. So, what do your last 20 tweets say about you?
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OPINION
August 6, 2007 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ
Did you see that YouTube video of an Australian priest hurling abuse at a motley crew of skateboarders in front of Melbourne's St. Patrick's Cathedral? Well, his superiors did, and last week the Rev. Mgr. Geoff Baron was placed on indefinite leave. And what about the famous, Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist's cringe-making "personal" e-mail about his wife leaving him for Ted Turner? Gawker highlighted it last week with this in the precede: "insane insane INSANE."
BUSINESS
September 17, 2010 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Teenage girls are likely to drive the top movie at the box office this weekend as a quartet of low-budget movies debut. High school comedy "Easy A" is expected to be the most popular movie in the U.S. and Canada, said people who have seen pre-release polls of potential audiences. It probably will come in slightly ahead of Ben Affleck's crime drama "The Town" and horror film "Devil," and far outpace the 3-D animated family adventure "Alpha and Omega," which is debuting with minimal interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1994 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When it comes to daring operatic ventures in the Southland, it seems that all roads lead to Long Beach, whose small-but-tough opera company is known for adventurous pluck. The operatic muse was in town again Thursday night, as Martin Herman's "The Scarlet Letter" had its world premiere in the Carpenter Center at Cal State Long Beach. The production is an impressive in-house effort by the Opera Ensemble of CSLB, with generous outside help.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1995
The one thing that Rosanne Welch and David Poland agree on in their assessments of Roland Joffe's "The Scarlet Letter" is that they hate Hawthorne so much that they did everything they could to avoid reading him ("Does Changing 'Scarlet' Make for a Red-Letter Day?," Calendar, Oct. 30). Welch sees the book narrowly as an anti-feminist morality tale, but to read Hawthorne in that fashion is to ignore the subversive, even feminist currents in the book. At the end of the book, a group of disenfranchised women began to come to Hester Prynne's cottage "demanding [to know]
BUSINESS
October 13, 1995 | CLAUDIA ELLER and JAMES BATES
It seems appropriate that the latest big-budget movie from Cinergi Pictures is "The Scarlet Letter," which opens in theaters today. The production company has been mired in red ink lately, despite having this year's biggest-grossing film to date worldwide, "Die Hard With a Vengeance." Such are the ironies of independent production companies. Take Carolco Pictures, which made some of the biggest-grossing films ever--"Terminator 2: Judgment Day," "Basic Instinct" and the "Rambo" series.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1995 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It sounds like a tragic tale of Hollywood hubris--a director gets his hands on a literary classic, and soon a stark rendering of defeated love is pumped into a steamy romance. The novel's dignified heroine is given a nude bathing scene and--gasp!--the ending is changed. And English professors across the land bow their heads and sob. Controversy had already begun to swirl around director Roland Joffe's interpretation of "The Scarlet Letter" well before it opened Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1998 | NICOLAUS MILLS, Nicolaus Mills is a professor of literature at Sarah Lawrence College and author of "The Triumph of Meanness: America's War Against Its Better Self" (Houghton Mifflin, 1997)
As we get ready for President Clinton's testimony before Kenneth Starr's grand jury today, perhaps the classic American novel of adultery, Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter," can teach us a little about compassion about sexual matters. Like any traditional Victorian, Hawthorne took adultery seriously. He was no liberal who thought the bedroom was purely private. Never in the course of his novel does he endorse Hester Prynne's belief that her love affair with the Rev.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1994 | CYNTHIA KELLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Scarlet Letter" as opera? To composer Martin Herman, Nathaniel Hawthorne's 1850 novel is a natural. "Hawthorne's language is strong," he said. "It has meter and sings in a way that suggests that it should be set to music. Hawthorne said himself in the opening passages of the book that this was his 'heart song' to his wife. The nice thing about opera is that it makes passions really big."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2008 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
Puritans breaking into power ballads makes heady sense in Mark Governor's rock musical "shAme," adapted from Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter." And not just because opposites -- in this case, repression and rock music -- attract. The story of Hester Prynne's adultery and condemnation by shrilly pious Bostonians in 1642 has the fevered delirium of a classic rock album.
OPINION
August 6, 2007 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ
Did you see that YouTube video of an Australian priest hurling abuse at a motley crew of skateboarders in front of Melbourne's St. Patrick's Cathedral? Well, his superiors did, and last week the Rev. Mgr. Geoff Baron was placed on indefinite leave. And what about the famous, Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist's cringe-making "personal" e-mail about his wife leaving him for Ted Turner? Gawker highlighted it last week with this in the precede: "insane insane INSANE."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2005 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
First there's the red mailbox, a startling splash of color amid the cool greenery at the foot of the road leading up to the Studio City home of opera singer Gloria Lane. Then there's the red front door -- opened by Lane, whose glamorous red lipstick matches her red shirt and shoes. On a table in the two-story entryway sits a bowl of faux bell peppers: also red.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2005 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
When New Line had its first research screening of "Wedding Crashers" in Pasadena last fall, the studio knew it had a potential hit on its hands. The madcap romantic comedy, which stars Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn as a pair of lovable rogues who get their kicks from partying at strangers' weddings, got a resoundingly enthusiastic reception from a theater full of young moviegoers. One of the studio's only concerns about the film, which arrives July 15, was its rating.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2004 | From Associated Press
The oldest known copy of Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter" was auctioned for $545,100, a record price for an American 19th century literary work, Christie's auction house said. The pre-sale estimate was between $200,000 and $300,000 for 144 pages of a printed proof of the classic novel. The manuscript was bought Thursday by an American book dealer who requested anonymity, Christie's New York spokeswoman Bendetta Roux said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2004 | Dan Lewerenz, Associated Press
Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter" was the furthest thing from Richard Kopley's mind when the English teacher started working on what would become his first scholarly book. But a string of literary coincidences and a bit of detective work have led to what one scholar calls a new way of looking at one of America's best-known authors.
NEWS
April 27, 1999 | SUSIE LINFIELD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a September afternoon in the tiny town of Goddard, N.H. Recently divorced Naomi Roth--whose heart belongs to her native New York City and to the radical movements of the '60s--is taking a stroll along the Sabbathday River when she spies something in the water. It looks like a child's lost doll, but it turns out to be a perfectly beautiful, perfectly dead baby girl. This becomes the event that will Change Naomi's Life Forever.
OPINION
November 16, 2013
Re "Uh, your character is showing," Opinion, Nov. 12 Jonah Goldberg nails it: Teenagers must grapple with their digital identities when trying to stand out in college admissions. But we should consider these same issues regarding future employers and others. How you use social media can be a reflection of who you are. The old way of Googling someone to see what you can dig up ahead of an interview (or a date) has given way to cursory searches and reviews of social feeds. So, what do your last 20 tweets say about you?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2003 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
The letter "A" from Hawthorne's classic novel is all over Louis Auchincloss' 59th book, "The Scarlet Letters," though Auchincloss' A's seem written in invisible ink.
NATIONAL
May 31, 2003 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Jeb Bush signed the repeal Friday of a Florida law that required women putting a child up for adoption to publish their sexual histories in newspapers if that would help locate the biological father. Now, under a replacement measure enacted by the Republican governor, men who believe they may have fathered a child will be urged to enter their names in a confidential paternity registry so they can be contacted if their offspring are offered for adoption.
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