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Scarlett O Hara

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | Claire Noland
Mary Anderson, a redheaded actress who auditioned for the part of Scarlett O'Hara in the 1939 epic "Gone With the Wind" but wound up playing a supporting role as Maybelle Merriwether, died Sunday. She was 96. A longtime resident of Brentwood, Anderson died under hospice care in Burbank. She had been in declining health and had suffered a series of small strokes, said her longtime friend Betty Landess. Anderson was one of the last surviving cast members of the film adaptation of Margaret Mitchell's Civil War novel.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | Claire Noland
Mary Anderson, a redheaded actress who auditioned for the part of Scarlett O'Hara in the 1939 epic "Gone With the Wind" but wound up playing a supporting role as Maybelle Merriwether, died Sunday. She was 96. A longtime resident of Brentwood, Anderson died under hospice care in Burbank. She had been in declining health and had suffered a series of small strokes, said her longtime friend Betty Landess. Anderson was one of the last surviving cast members of the film adaptation of Margaret Mitchell's Civil War novel.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1993
I've seen Hillary Rodham Clinton criticized for everything from her public involvement to her hair style to her cookie recipes, but Merrill Joan Gerber's column (Commentary, Dec. 5) claiming that a Vogue photo of Hillary with her face in her hands is "suggestive" tops them all. Since Gerber feels "the First Lady needs to have a few 'airs,' " then maybe she should suggest that next time Mrs. Clinton pose as Marie Antoinette or Scarlett O'Hara. DALE N. FLANAGAN Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2013 | By Susan King
British actress Vivien Leigh had that undefinable star quality. For 30 years, the exquisitely beautiful Leigh captivated film and theater audiences with her well-crafted, magnetic performances. In fact, Leigh won lead actress Oscars for creating two of the most indelible characters in screen history - the strong-willed, manipulative Southern belle Scarlett O'Hara in the beloved 1939 Civil War epic, "Gone With the Wind," and Tennessee Williams' fragile, faded Southern beauty Blanche DuBois in 1951's "A Streetcar Named Desire.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The London critics came, they saw, and frankly, my dear, most were unmoved by a new musical adaptation of "Gone With the Wind." Critics played on Rhett Butler's famous exit line to Scarlett O'Hara: "Frankly, it's hard to give a damn about this Wind," said the headline in Wednesday's Daily Express about the show that opened Tuesday at the West End's New London Theatre. The Times' Benedict Nightingale was gentler. "I did give a damn," he wrote. "But not as big a damn as I had hoped."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1998
Was "The Importance of Bein' Scarlett" (June 26) supposed to be satire? It's difficult to believe that in this day and age there are still women as shallow as Scarlett Hinson, profiled in this story. If there is a character to emulate in "Gone With the Wind," let it be Melanie Wilkes. At least that character looked beyond stereotypes and social roles in her dealings with the other characters in the book. After 24 years and several readings, the only trait I see to admire in Scarlett O'Hara is tenacity.
NEWS
June 26, 1998 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A newcomer needs to know two things about Atlanta in order to survive. Every street is named Peachtree, and every woman might as well be named Scarlett. It's an exaggeration, of course. But in a place where reality often feels exaggerated--the heat, the history, the hospitality--hyperbole serves a purpose. Just as there are two kinds of tea offered everywhere you go here, so there are two kinds of truth--sweetened and unsweetened.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2013 | By Susan King
British actress Vivien Leigh had that undefinable star quality. For 30 years, the exquisitely beautiful Leigh captivated film and theater audiences with her well-crafted, magnetic performances. In fact, Leigh won lead actress Oscars for creating two of the most indelible characters in screen history - the strong-willed, manipulative Southern belle Scarlett O'Hara in the beloved 1939 Civil War epic, "Gone With the Wind," and Tennessee Williams' fragile, faded Southern beauty Blanche DuBois in 1951's "A Streetcar Named Desire.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2008 | GEOFF BOUCHER
Now here's a deal: This Saturday, selected AMC Theatres will screen all five Oscar best-picture nominees for $30. Details are at www.amc theatres.com, but the binge starts with "Michael Clayton" at 11 a.m. and ends more than 12 hours later with the cut-to-black finale of "No Country for Old Men." Warning: This year's nominees (except for the plucky "Juno") are pretty grisly. And if they don't leave you queasy enough, the deal also includes a bottomless bucket of popcorn. . . . Joanne Whalley has played Scarlett O'Hara and Jackie Onassis, and she popped up in "Scandal," "Willow" and "Pink Floyd's The Wall."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1994
Although your reviewer was somewhat kind to Shannen Doherty's performance as Margaret Mitchell in NBC's "A Burning Passion," this viewer was appalled (" 'Burning Passion' Brings Mitchell's Tara to Real Life," Nov. 7). Doherty may make it as a Beverly Hills brat, but as Mitchell she did not have the vaguest concept of what being a flirtatious Atlanta belle is all about. Most of the time she was simply dour, morose and downright unpleasant. In a television interview, Doherty stated that, as part of the research for the role, she did not bother to read "Gone With the Wind"!
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2009 | Susan King
To celebrate the movie's 70th birthday, Warner Home Video is releasing a newly restored and remastered version today of "Gone With the Wind" for the first time on Blu-ray, as well as a standard DVD. The Technicolor film has never looked better because of new digital software and the fact that Warners was able to scan the original negative. "It is in beautiful condition," says George Feltenstein, senior vice president of theatrical catalog marketing for Warners, of the negative.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2008 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Fred Crane, a former longtime Los Angeles classical music radio announcer who achieved a slice of film immortality when he played one of the handsome Tarleton twins in the 1939 movie classic "Gone With the Wind," has died. He was 90. Crane, who had been hospitalized for a few weeks with complications related to diabetes, died of a blood clot in his lung Thursday in a hospital near Atlanta, said his wife, Terry. Crane was said to be the oldest surviving adult male cast member of "Gone With the Wind," producer David O. Selznick's epic production of the Margaret Mitchell novel starring Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The London critics came, they saw, and frankly, my dear, most were unmoved by a new musical adaptation of "Gone With the Wind." Critics played on Rhett Butler's famous exit line to Scarlett O'Hara: "Frankly, it's hard to give a damn about this Wind," said the headline in Wednesday's Daily Express about the show that opened Tuesday at the West End's New London Theatre. The Times' Benedict Nightingale was gentler. "I did give a damn," he wrote. "But not as big a damn as I had hoped."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2008 | GEOFF BOUCHER
Now here's a deal: This Saturday, selected AMC Theatres will screen all five Oscar best-picture nominees for $30. Details are at www.amc theatres.com, but the binge starts with "Michael Clayton" at 11 a.m. and ends more than 12 hours later with the cut-to-black finale of "No Country for Old Men." Warning: This year's nominees (except for the plucky "Juno") are pretty grisly. And if they don't leave you queasy enough, the deal also includes a bottomless bucket of popcorn. . . . Joanne Whalley has played Scarlett O'Hara and Jackie Onassis, and she popped up in "Scandal," "Willow" and "Pink Floyd's The Wall."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
In Europe, 1939 was nightmarish, as German dictator Adolf Hitler's armies invaded Poland, sparking World War II. In the United States, the far-off war notwithstanding, the mood was brighter, as Americans were finally pulling themselves out of the decade-long Depression. President Franklin D. Roosevelt was on the eve of running for an unprecedented third term and was basking in a popularity surge. Travelers from around the world were flocking to the World's Fair in New York City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1998
Was "The Importance of Bein' Scarlett" (June 26) supposed to be satire? It's difficult to believe that in this day and age there are still women as shallow as Scarlett Hinson, profiled in this story. If there is a character to emulate in "Gone With the Wind," let it be Melanie Wilkes. At least that character looked beyond stereotypes and social roles in her dealings with the other characters in the book. After 24 years and several readings, the only trait I see to admire in Scarlett O'Hara is tenacity.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2009 | Susan King
To celebrate the movie's 70th birthday, Warner Home Video is releasing a newly restored and remastered version today of "Gone With the Wind" for the first time on Blu-ray, as well as a standard DVD. The Technicolor film has never looked better because of new digital software and the fact that Warners was able to scan the original negative. "It is in beautiful condition," says George Feltenstein, senior vice president of theatrical catalog marketing for Warners, of the negative.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2008 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Fred Crane, a former longtime Los Angeles classical music radio announcer who achieved a slice of film immortality when he played one of the handsome Tarleton twins in the 1939 movie classic "Gone With the Wind," has died. He was 90. Crane, who had been hospitalized for a few weeks with complications related to diabetes, died of a blood clot in his lung Thursday in a hospital near Atlanta, said his wife, Terry. Crane was said to be the oldest surviving adult male cast member of "Gone With the Wind," producer David O. Selznick's epic production of the Margaret Mitchell novel starring Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh.
NEWS
June 26, 1998 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A newcomer needs to know two things about Atlanta in order to survive. Every street is named Peachtree, and every woman might as well be named Scarlett. It's an exaggeration, of course. But in a place where reality often feels exaggerated--the heat, the history, the hospitality--hyperbole serves a purpose. Just as there are two kinds of tea offered everywhere you go here, so there are two kinds of truth--sweetened and unsweetened.
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