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Scavenging

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1994 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Alvarez lives in what might charitably be called a mixed neighborhood. The heroin addicts keep to the quake-damaged apartments near the flood control channel. The hookers and crack dealers work the cul-du-sac across the street. Gang members drop by occasionally to drink some beer, bust a few windows and leave some more scrawl. And the homeless find a quiet corner. There is a definite hierarchy among those living in the string of abandoned apartment buildings in Sylmar.
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WORLD
January 4, 2005 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
K.D. Nimal, 42, a coconut tree climber by trade, lost his wife, both parents and his 8-year-old daughter in the tsunami. Yet even as fortune ripped apart his life, it blessed him in at least one way. That day, he'd brought his 10-year-old son along as he sidled up trees and cut down their fruit, preparing the boy for the day when he'd be old enough to do it himself. That seemingly casual decision saved his son's life. "I'm so lucky I took him with me," Nimal said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man who allegedly earned $800 to $1,200 a week by taking newspapers from curbside recycling bins in the San Fernando Valley was cited Monday by a new anti-scavenging police patrol unit. Roger Bird, 43, of Sun Valley, was cited Monday morning and charged with a misdemeanor offense as he was allegedly seen loading his blue Ford van with newspapers from yellow recycling bins in Northridge, according to police. Officers described Bird as the "scavenging kingpin of the Valley."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Department of Conservation awarded the city of Los Angeles $100,000 to help expand an anti-scavenging program that had successful results during a pilot effort in the west San Fernando Valley, officials announced Wednesday. The program pays police and reserve officers to work overtime at night and in the early morning hours to nab people who steal newspapers, aluminum cans and bottle from the residential recycling containers.
NEWS
October 18, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite opposition by lawmakers from South Los Angeles, the City Council voted Tuesday to implement a citywide police patrol program to target thieves who pilfer newspapers and other recyclables from residential curbside recycling bins. The program will be modeled after a six-month pilot program that was recently completed in the west San Fernando Valley and was credited with saving the city thousands of dollars in recycling revenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1997 | ALLISON COHEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The city of Los Angeles has been talking a lot of trash lately. Reacting to the loss of $2 million to theft by trash scavengers during fiscal 1995-96, the City Council has approved one-third of an estimated $33-million plan to buy anti-scavenging curbside recycling receptacles for about 720,000 Los Angeles homes. The bins--sometimes called "new blues" for their bright blue color--are scheduled to replace the familiar 14-gallon yellow bins citywide by 1999.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1995 | JOHN COX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Long Beach planners admit they were pretty naive about setting up the city's first recycling center six years ago. The city optimistically crafted general rules on how the center should be run. No one suspected it could sometimes draw transients, prostitutes and drug dealers into the surrounding neighborhood. "This was at a time when recycling was something that everybody was looking at as a good thing," said city zoning officer Bob Benard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2007 | Tony Barboza, Times Staff Writer
Bottles and cans clanged in Richard Hart's half-full shopping cart as he pushed it toward the next block of houses in Sherman Oaks. He didn't expect to cross paths with half a dozen other recycling scavengers -- people who, like him, on trash days collect discarded containers to cash in on their 5- and 10-cent deposit values. Other people's trash, in their eyes, is like nickels and dimes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles city attorneys are looking for a way to speed up legal proceedings to clear squatters and scavengers out of vacant, quake-damaged apartment buildings in the San Fernando Valley and Hollywood and seal the structures, officials said Friday. The unusual tactic to eliminate the "ghost towns" of vacant buildings that have become a haven for vandals, drug users and prostitutes was discussed at a City Hall meeting Friday of a special task force assigned to battle the problem.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Gwertsman is on a mission. For several months now, Gwertsman and six associates have carefully planned their assault. They have gathered their gear--cell phones, laptop computers, walkie-talkies, flashlights, ropes and duct tape--rented a van and studied maps. Their destination is an "investors meeting" that will draw about 70 people from around the country to Los Angeles for Memorial Day weekend. But that's just a cover. Because there is no investors meeting; it's just a game. "The Game."
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