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Scavenging

WORLD
January 4, 2005 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
K.D. Nimal, 42, a coconut tree climber by trade, lost his wife, both parents and his 8-year-old daughter in the tsunami. Yet even as fortune ripped apart his life, it blessed him in at least one way. That day, he'd brought his 10-year-old son along as he sidled up trees and cut down their fruit, preparing the boy for the day when he'd be old enough to do it himself. That seemingly casual decision saved his son's life. "I'm so lucky I took him with me," Nimal said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man who allegedly earned $800 to $1,200 a week by taking newspapers from curbside recycling bins in the San Fernando Valley was cited Monday by a new anti-scavenging police patrol unit. Roger Bird, 43, of Sun Valley, was cited Monday morning and charged with a misdemeanor offense as he was allegedly seen loading his blue Ford van with newspapers from yellow recycling bins in Northridge, according to police. Officers described Bird as the "scavenging kingpin of the Valley."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Department of Conservation awarded the city of Los Angeles $100,000 to help expand an anti-scavenging program that had successful results during a pilot effort in the west San Fernando Valley, officials announced Wednesday. The program pays police and reserve officers to work overtime at night and in the early morning hours to nab people who steal newspapers, aluminum cans and bottle from the residential recycling containers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1997 | ALLISON COHEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The city of Los Angeles has been talking a lot of trash lately. Reacting to the loss of $2 million to theft by trash scavengers during fiscal 1995-96, the City Council has approved one-third of an estimated $33-million plan to buy anti-scavenging curbside recycling receptacles for about 720,000 Los Angeles homes. The bins--sometimes called "new blues" for their bright blue color--are scheduled to replace the familiar 14-gallon yellow bins citywide by 1999.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1995 | JOHN COX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Long Beach planners admit they were pretty naive about setting up the city's first recycling center six years ago. The city optimistically crafted general rules on how the center should be run. No one suspected it could sometimes draw transients, prostitutes and drug dealers into the surrounding neighborhood. "This was at a time when recycling was something that everybody was looking at as a good thing," said city zoning officer Bob Benard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles city attorneys are looking for a way to speed up legal proceedings to clear squatters and scavengers out of vacant, quake-damaged apartment buildings in the San Fernando Valley and Hollywood and seal the structures, officials said Friday. The unusual tactic to eliminate the "ghost towns" of vacant buildings that have become a haven for vandals, drug users and prostitutes was discussed at a City Hall meeting Friday of a special task force assigned to battle the problem.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Gwertsman is on a mission. For several months now, Gwertsman and six associates have carefully planned their assault. They have gathered their gear--cell phones, laptop computers, walkie-talkies, flashlights, ropes and duct tape--rented a van and studied maps. Their destination is an "investors meeting" that will draw about 70 people from around the country to Los Angeles for Memorial Day weekend. But that's just a cover. Because there is no investors meeting; it's just a game. "The Game."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1990 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the quiet before the trash trucks arrived, as the city slept, Redondo Beach Detective Don Martinez confronted the nemesis of the recycling age. She was small, for a nemesis: an elderly immigrant woman with a trash bag in one hand and someone else's recycling bin in the other. "No! No! No!" the policeman told her, using one of the few words they both understood. "No!" And he touched the bright orange curbside bin that was brimming with crushed aluminum cans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1992 | AJOWA IFATEYO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the 12 years that Frank has been on the streets, the meals he has scavenged from dumpsters have made him violently ill more than once. "Ptomaine," Frank explained. "Now I only eat fruit and vegetables" out of dumpsters, he said. To help Frank, who declined to give his last name, and others like him become aware of the dangers of foraging in dumpsters for food, a Garden Grove couple teamed up with a homeless activist and produced a video titled "The Fine Art of Dumpster Dining."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1995
On Sept. 6, "Navigating the Real World" featured the issue of homeless or low-income people scavenging from residential recycling containers to obtain small amounts of glass or plastic for resale. Here are excerpts from letters of two readers: "My biggest ethical concern has less to do with those of us that paid for the recyclable containers and make the effort to cooperate with the city, but with the jobs of city employees that collect, sort, transport and administer the whole recycling project.
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