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Scenario Magazine

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1999
Concerning Kenneth Turan's article "Riches From a Fast, Cheap Master" (Aug. 1): Acknowledging that Edgar Ulmer was indeed a facile and prolific director, it well might be worth repeating that the writer in Hollywood is continually being shortchanged as the creative source for many a movie. Specifically I refer to the movie "Detour," described as "Ulmer's masterpiece." My late husband, Martin Goldsmith, sold the rights to his 1939 novel of the same name to Producers Releasing Corp. on condition that he would write the script.
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NEWS
January 5, 1997
"Read Any Good Movies, Lately" by Joseph Hanania (Dec. 18) portrays Scenario, the Magazine of the Screenwriting Art, as the really only game in town for publishing multiple screenplays (four in each quarterly issue). Let me correct the record. I am Sam Thomas, a member of the Writer's Guild for almost 30 years, and editor of the ongoing series "Best American Screenplays," published in hardcover by Crown (Random House), now three collections, with a fourth planned. All of these anthologies--the first with a foreword by Frank Capra--are still happily in print since the initial work was published in 1986.
NEWS
April 15, 2004 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
The palpable sensation of a transfixed audience accompanies "The Drawer Boy" at the Colony Theatre in Burbank. Actor-turned-playwright Michael Healey's celebrated study of the power of storytelling on two longtime Canadian comrades receives a beautiful, understated Los Angeles premiere. "The Drawer Boy" has been a hit since its 1999 debut production at Toronto's Theatre Passe Muraille (whose farm family collation "The Farm Play" inspired Healey's scenario).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1998 | Bill Desowitz, Bill Desowitz is a regular contributor to Calendar
When "Donnie Brasco" screenwriter Paul Attanasio was asked about competing against "L.A. Confidential" in the current Oscar race, he retorted that at least Curtis Hanson's noir crime film was a "real movie." Such is the continuing lament about Hollywood's qualitative decline, which now coincides with a longing for the '70s--Hollywood's last Golden Age, when storytelling and soul-searching still mattered.
NEWS
December 18, 1996 | JOSEPH HANANIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Pretty much all of the big commercial films being released by major studios these days have a certain written-by-chimps-locked-in-a-room-with-a-laptop-quality," claimed a recent issue of Entertainment Weekly. "Story lines veer in nonsensical directions, dialogue is dim or dopey, [and] characters have the heft of balsa wood." Even amid all this, writers are going for respect, and a magazine is regularly publishing their screenplays.
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