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Scene Stealer

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October 22, 2009 | Patrick Kevin Day
The fantastic island home of the Wild Things in "Where the Wild Things Are" looks like it required globe-hopping to capture its parts on film -- the landscapes include turbulent coastline, barren forest, desert sand dunes and rocky cliffs. All (with the exception of the dunes) were located within 90 minutes of downtown Melbourne, Australia. "Maybe it could have been shot in America," said production designer K.K. Barrett. "But it would have required such a caravan traveling to so many different places.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It is the face of Eileen Brennan that will stay with me as much as any one of the performances the quintessential character actress packed into her very long career. Not a classic beauty, her face was arresting for its very distinct abilities. The eyes alone were scene-stealers, so often carrying the weight of the world. Whether they were being called on to condemn or forgive, Brennan somehow left you feeling that she was handling the petty frustrations of life for the rest of us. Her voice is what got her a start in the business -- singing on stage -- though what lingers is the sound of a gravelly alto that seemed stained by whiskey and cigarettes whether she smoked or drank a day in her life.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2003 | Elaine Dutka
Joan CUSACK likes to describe herself as "normal." She makes her home in Chicago, a world apart from the show business mainstream. And she's nothing like the wacky characters she's played -- the big-haired Staten Island secretary in "Working Girl" or Kevin Kline's befuddled fiancee in "In & Out," which led to best supporting actress Oscar nominations. Still, after memorable performances in films such as "Addams Family Values" and "Broadcast News," the rubber-faced actress has emerged as one of Hollywood's leading comedians.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Matt Donnelly
Elle magazine celebrated its 19th Women in Hollywood Awards on Monday, welcoming 2012's class of ladies and their famous supporters to the Four Seasons Beverly Hills. Cate Blanchett, Susan Sarandon, Emma Watson, Octavia Spencer, Sarah Jessica Parker, Elle Fanning, Kristen Wiig, Uma Thurman and Shirley MacLaine were toasted for iconic performances and off-camera efforts -- and a few boys were allowed.  Like Robert Pattinson, who came to give Thurman her prize. The pair costarred in the period drama "Bel Ami," and Rob extolled Thurman's talent and generosity in his remarks, a task he struggled a bit with.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1986 | JOHN VOLAND
What--or rather who--is a scene stealer? Mike the Dog in "Down and Out in Beverly Hills" is a prime example, but give any animal a featured role in a movie and he'll turn into a ham. There are some classic scene stealers: Jack Palance as the cold-blooded hired gun in "Shane." Hattie McDaniel as Scarlett's sassy maid in "Gone With the Wind." Jack Nicholson as the good-natured, alcoholic lawyer in "Easy Rider."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1996 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While most Hollywood actresses will do just about anything to land the young and glamorous roles, what Chicago stage actress Irma P. Hall wants above all is to play old and infirm. Since becoming an actress full-time at about 40 years old --after a career as a teacher--Hall, 61, has played a steady stream of octo- and nonagenarians. And that's just the way she likes it. "I have a friend who's been in plays with me who says 'I'm too vain to do what you do'," Hall says with a big laugh.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2012
MOVIES Before Wes Anderson's films examined the preppy-adjacent struggles of upper middle class young people, Whit Stillman walked a similar beat in '80s with witty films such as "Barcelona," "Metropolitan" and the third of his self-described "Doomed Bourgeois in Love" trilogy, "Last Days of Disco," which screens at the Cinefamily with the writer-director on hand. Chloe Sevigny, Kate Beckinsale and bone-dry scene-stealer Chris Eigeman star in an unironic, funny and even moving depiction of coming of age in the privileged class while sparing the easy, '70s cliches.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2012 | By Lisa Rosen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Behold a scene of lust and betrayal between a young woman and another woman's fiancé, on top of a kitchen table. Make that on top of a birthday cake. On the betrayed woman's birthday. Oh, and the women are roommates. Then discover that it's not only excusable behavior but also actually a kinky act of kindness. And that's just the opening scene of "Don't Trust the B---- in Apartment 23," ABC'ssubversive midseason addition to the quirky-girl comedy trend, which has its season finale Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2009 | By Maria Elena Fernandez
Sofia Vergara, the Colombian former Univision TV host who became famous in Latin America for her flirty personality, voluptuous physique and Latin lovers, never intended to be a scene-stealing funny girl on American TV. But that's exactly what she is on ABC's new hit comedy "Modern Family." FOR THE RECORD: Sofia Vergara: A photo caption in Sunday's Calendar section with The Sunday Conversation column, in which Sofia Vergara from the ABC comedy "Modern Family" was interviewed, misspelled her first name as Sonia.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2009 | Patrick Kevin Day
The fantastic island home of the Wild Things in "Where the Wild Things Are" looks like it required globe-hopping to capture its parts on film -- the landscapes include turbulent coastline, barren forest, desert sand dunes and rocky cliffs. All (with the exception of the dunes) were located within 90 minutes of downtown Melbourne, Australia. "Maybe it could have been shot in America," said production designer K.K. Barrett. "But it would have required such a caravan traveling to so many different places.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2009 | Patrick Kevin Day
Visual-effects-supervisor-turned-first-time-feature-director Hoyt Yeatman had a unique challenge on his hands with "G-Force." Not only did the film mix animated characters with live-action characters -- always tricky -- but midway through shooting, producer Jerry Bruckheimer had an unexpected request. "Jerry came to me and said, 'Guess what? It needs to be 3-D,' " Yeatman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2009 | Patrick Kevin Day
Science fiction on a shoestring isn't unheard of (who can forget "Plan 9 From Outer Space"?), but to make something that's not going to inspire "Mystery Science Theater"-style commentary takes ingenuity. Visual effects supervisor Mark Russell had just $200,000 to create "Sleep Dealer" director Alex Rivera's vision of a near-future in which Mexican migrant workers perform manual labor across the U.S. through virtual-reality rigs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2009 | Patrick Kevin Day
In a special-effects bonanza such as "Watchmen," a single effect like Dr. Manhattan's eerie blue look could easily be lost in the tumult of nuclear explosions, flying ships, Martian palaces and Antarctic lairs. But with more than 300 shots totaling about 38 minutes of screen time, the effect had to be executed to perfection. Since digitally adding the blue glow to the superhero character played by Billy Crudup in post-production would be prohibitively expensive, John "D.J."
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