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Scenic Area Act

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NEWS
June 29, 2001 | Associated Press
The state Supreme Court on Thursday overturned an agency's bid to remove a house from a bluff overlooking the spectacular Columbia River Gorge. Brian and Jody Bea won approval in 1996 from Skamania County to build on property his family had owned for generations. The county approved a permit that included conditions designed to protect the scenic value of the area, and the Beas began to build.
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NEWS
May 11, 2004 | Orna Izakson, Special to The Times
The owners of the defunct Broughton lumber mill on the windsurfing-crazed Columbia River Gorge envision a 68-acre resort on their site that opponents say would spoil the federally protected shoreline along the choppy waters separating Oregon and Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1988 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
The city of Los Angeles needs to reduce its diversion of water from the Mono Lake basin by up to 75% in order to preserve the lake's delicate and unusual ecosystem, the U.S. Forest Service said Tuesday as it unveiled a draft management plan in Los Angeles. Although the Forest Service cannot legally compel the city to cut back its water consumption, the Mono Basin National Forest Scenic Area management plan was applauded by a spokeswoman for the Mono Lake Committee.
SPORTS
February 13, 1991 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The drizzling remnants of a weekend storm do not dampen the optimism of Chuck Overson as he drives along the Smith River, home of California's largest steelhead. While a visitor admires the stands of stately redwoods, Overson, who operates Six Rivers Guide Service, studies the clear, emerald-green flow of the river. "Your timing is perfect," he says. "This water looks great. You should have great fishing tomorrow."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1986 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
The boots, running shoes and "Mono Lake, It's Worth Saving" T-shirts of the Sierra Club members contrasted sharply with their guest's dark blue suit and white shirt. Here in the Central Valley, on a gloomy, rainy Saturday, March 15, Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley was confronting another problem in his campaign for governor and the sight of those T-shirts showed that finding a solution would be difficult.
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