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Scepter Records

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NEWS
November 3, 1995
Florence Greenberg, 82, a restless housewife who launched the successful Scepter Records. Mrs. Greenberg, looking for something to do once her children were in school, became enchanted with four of her daughter's New Jersey schoolmates who billed themselves as the Shirelles. She recorded their first song, "I Met Him on a Sunday," for her first employer, Tiara Records.
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NEWS
November 3, 1995
Florence Greenberg, 82, a restless housewife who launched the successful Scepter Records. Mrs. Greenberg, looking for something to do once her children were in school, became enchanted with four of her daughter's New Jersey schoolmates who billed themselves as the Shirelles. She recorded their first song, "I Met Him on a Sunday," for her first employer, Tiara Records.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1992 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Florence Greenberg's story as founder and guiding spirit of Scepter Records in the '50s, '60s and '70s is probably as colorful as that of any of the label's many hit acts. Greenberg was a 34-year-old New Jersey housewife who was anxious to get out of the house in the mid-'50s after her two children were in school. Despite having no background in the music business, she took the advice of a music publisher friend who urged her to get into the record business.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1992 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Florence Greenberg's story as founder and guiding spirit of Scepter Records in the '50s, '60s and '70s is probably as colorful as that of any of the label's many hit acts. Greenberg was a 34-year-old New Jersey housewife who was anxious to get out of the house in the mid-'50s after her two children were in school. Despite having no background in the music business, she took the advice of a music publisher friend who urged her to get into the record business.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1998 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
In recent years, the big talk about synergy between films and music has centered on soundtrack albums, which use the widespread exposure of a hit song as a promotional boost for an upcoming movie. But Rhino Films head Stephen Nemeth, one of the producers of "Why Do Fools Fall in Love," sees his film as just the first in a wave of music biography films. "Music biographies provide the most pure form of synergy between a film and music company," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1992 | STEVE APPLEFORD, Steve Appleford writes regularly about music for The Times
That's the unmistakable tone of satisfaction in the voice of Steve Tyrell, talking now of his most recent ride high onto the pop music charts. Not that Tyrell hasn't been here before, as record producer, songwriter, promoter, and record company executive for musicians as varied as Linda Ronstadt and the Kingsmen.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
Being the lone bluesman in Mexico City sounds like a sure-fire ticket to obscurity, but singer-guitarist Javier Batiz can count on one influential friend: Carlos Santana. Batiz, who performs with Borracho y Loco at the Belly Up in Solana Beach tonight and at the Palomino on Saturday, was invited by Santana to appear with the latter's group on seven California dates last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1992 | JOHN D'AGOSTINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The late Hank Williams (1923-53) generally is regarded as the most influential, most beloved country-and-Western artist of all time. An immensely gifted and prolific songwriter and musical visionary, Williams did for country what Elvis did for rock and roll, Louis Armstrong did for jazz and Muddy Waters did for modern blues. But Williams was neither a prisoner of genre nor a slave to temporal convention.
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