Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSchaeffer Cox
IN THE NEWS

Schaeffer Cox

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
January 8, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
The youthful head of a self-styled Alaska militia that collected firearms and grenades and talked of killing judges and government employees was sentenced Tuesday to more than 25 years in prison, despite his lawyer's claim that he suffered from paranoid delusions. Prosecutors had sought 35 years for  Schaeffer Cox , who had gained a following in far-right circles across the West with his message that the government had strayed from its constitutional authority. Secretly  he and his followers began accumulating weaponry and plotting retribution.  Tuesday's hearing in Anchorage marked a substantial turnaround for the 28-year-old former leader of the Alaska Peacemakers Militia, who spent his trial in May and June denying wrongdoing and accusing the government of putting his political beliefs on trial.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
January 15, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE -- Anyone who thought the militia movement in Alaska would forgive and forget when it was revealed that onetime militia "supply sergeant" Bill Fulton was working undercover for the FBI should have thought twice. The news that Fulton, a once-popular vendor of military supplies to the far right in Anchorage, was actually a secret federal informant trying to take down the head of the Alaska Peacemakers Militia has elicited a scornful response. Words like "traitor" and "man without a country" pepper the postings this week on the site of the Alaska Citizens Militia, which has no connection to the group headed by Fairbanks resident Schaeffer Cox, who was sentenced last week to 25 years in prison.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
May 8, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
ANCHORAGE - With his Boy Scout good looks and schoolboy cap, Schaeffer Cox was known for striding happily through the treacherous backwater between rabble rousing and revolution. In university auditoriums and community meeting halls throughout the West over the last few years, the 28-year-old Cox has preached the gospel of free will, no taxes and unregulated firearms. He's also warned growing legions of supporters that the dictionary defines "terrorism" as government through intimidation - and that its logical antidote is "horrible rebellion.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE -- Now that the mole who helped bring down the leadership of the Alaska Peacemaker Militia has talked publicly , the big question on some minds in Alaska is: Why was federal FBI informant William Fulton involved in political campaigns? The controversy has erupted over the past few days, as it emerged that Fulton, an Anchorage military surplus store owner who helped gather evidence against militia leader Schaeffer Cox, had helped manage the unsuccessful campaign of right-wing former radio host Eddie Burke for lieutenant governor in 2010.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2013 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
In another life, William Fulton was "Drop Zone Bill," a bounty hunter who ran a military surplus store in Anchorage. You need a tactical vest? A bayonet that would clip neatly onto an M-4? Bill Fulton was your man. "We do bad things to bad people," his company jackets said. Fulton was also a go-to guy for Republican politicians who occasionally needed to reach out to the far right fringes of the party - those who spent weekends in the woods in camo gear and considered the 2nd Amendment an expression of divine intent.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE -- Anyone who thought the militia movement in Alaska would forgive and forget when it was revealed that onetime militia "supply sergeant" Bill Fulton was working undercover for the FBI should have thought twice. The news that Fulton, a once-popular vendor of military supplies to the far right in Anchorage, was actually a secret federal informant trying to take down the head of the Alaska Peacemakers Militia has elicited a scornful response. Words like "traitor" and "man without a country" pepper the postings this week on the site of the Alaska Citizens Militia, which has no connection to the group headed by Fairbanks resident Schaeffer Cox, who was sentenced last week to 25 years in prison.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE -- Now that the mole who helped bring down the leadership of the Alaska Peacemaker Militia has talked publicly , the big question on some minds in Alaska is: Why was federal FBI informant William Fulton involved in political campaigns? The controversy has erupted over the past few days, as it emerged that Fulton, an Anchorage military surplus store owner who helped gather evidence against militia leader Schaeffer Cox, had helped manage the unsuccessful campaign of right-wing former radio host Eddie Burke for lieutenant governor in 2010.
NATIONAL
June 19, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
Firefighters scrambled Tuesday to douse two new hot spots near the most destructive wildfire in Colorado history, using helicopters and blasts of water to keep the new blazes from joining the large one. The two spot fires are in steep canyons just north of Highway 14 and the Poudre River, which had been - until Tuesday - the northern-most boundaries of the 92-square-mile High Park fire. High winds and airborn embers from that raging fire near Fort Collins, Colo., sparked the new flames, officials said.
NATIONAL
June 19, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
The Southern Baptist Convention is expected to elect its first black president at its annual meeting on Tuesday: Fred Luter Jr., a New Orleans street preacher who revived his church in the wake of Hurricane Katrina . The meeting began Tuesday morning at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, but the presidential election is not expected to start until 2:50 p.m. Central time. As of Tuesday morning, Luter, 55, pastor of the roughly 5,000-member Franklin Avenue Baptist Church less than five miles away, was the only candidate.
NATIONAL
June 19, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- On Tuesday, a Texas military judge barred former Ft. Hood Army psychiatrist -- and alleged shooter -- Maj. Nidal Hasan from court because he appeared with a beard. Hasan is preparing to stand trial in connection with the deadly 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood, about 70 miles northwest of Austin. Judge Gregory Gross told Hasan on Tuesday that he will have to attend hearings via closed-circuit video until he shaves. Earlier this month, Gross had warned Hasan that his beard violated Army policy.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2013 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
In another life, William Fulton was "Drop Zone Bill," a bounty hunter who ran a military surplus store in Anchorage. You need a tactical vest? A bayonet that would clip neatly onto an M-4? Bill Fulton was your man. "We do bad things to bad people," his company jackets said. Fulton was also a go-to guy for Republican politicians who occasionally needed to reach out to the far right fringes of the party - those who spent weekends in the woods in camo gear and considered the 2nd Amendment an expression of divine intent.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
The youthful head of a self-styled Alaska militia that collected firearms and grenades and talked of killing judges and government employees was sentenced Tuesday to more than 25 years in prison, despite his lawyer's claim that he suffered from paranoid delusions. Prosecutors had sought 35 years for  Schaeffer Cox , who had gained a following in far-right circles across the West with his message that the government had strayed from its constitutional authority. Secretly  he and his followers began accumulating weaponry and plotting retribution.  Tuesday's hearing in Anchorage marked a substantial turnaround for the 28-year-old former leader of the Alaska Peacemakers Militia, who spent his trial in May and June denying wrongdoing and accusing the government of putting his political beliefs on trial.
NATIONAL
May 8, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
ANCHORAGE - With his Boy Scout good looks and schoolboy cap, Schaeffer Cox was known for striding happily through the treacherous backwater between rabble rousing and revolution. In university auditoriums and community meeting halls throughout the West over the last few years, the 28-year-old Cox has preached the gospel of free will, no taxes and unregulated firearms. He's also warned growing legions of supporters that the dictionary defines "terrorism" as government through intimidation - and that its logical antidote is "horrible rebellion.
NATIONAL
June 20, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
As record rainfall and flooding continue in northeastern Minnesota, the National Weather Service in Duluth has gone beyond issuing a flash-flood warning and ramped it up to a "flash-flood emergency. " Calling the weather conditions "very dangerous, very intense and very unusual," Mike Stewart of the weather service told the Los Angeles Times on Wednesday morning: "This is a first, at least for the area. We've never done a flash-flood emergency. " "The flooding is the worst we've had since 1972" in the Twin Ports area and along the north shore of Lake Superior, he added.  PHOTOS: Duluth struggling with floodwaters The weather also spurred Duluth Mayor Don Ness to declare a state of emergency in his city Wednesday morning.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|