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September 22, 1989 | CAROL HALL, Newsday
Thirteen years after he appeared in a Dewar's Profile ad, ("Wildlife conservationist; International Airline Pilot"), David O. Hill said friends still introduce him by saying: "He was a Dewar's guy." Eleven years after his profile ran, Les Payne ("Journalist") has a copy hanging on his office wall with other memorabilia: a picture of him and Jimmy Carter, his Pulitzer Prize plaque, a picture of Payne on "Meet the Press."
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NEWS
September 22, 1989 | CAROL HALL, Newsday
Thirteen years after he appeared in a Dewar's Profile ad, ("Wildlife conservationist; International Airline Pilot"), David O. Hill said friends still introduce him by saying: "He was a Dewar's guy." Eleven years after his profile ran, Les Payne ("Journalist") has a copy hanging on his office wall with other memorabilia: a picture of him and Jimmy Carter, his Pulitzer Prize plaque, a picture of Payne on "Meet the Press."
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NEWS
November 12, 1987 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
At the time Anthony M. Kennedy was a lobbyist for Schenley Industries Inc., in Sacramento, the giant liquor producer allegedly was paying hundreds of thousands of dollars in illegal kickbacks to liquor distributors and restaurants in New York and California, records in those states show. The records give no indication that Kennedy, picked for the Supreme Court, played any role in the illicit schemes, for which Schenley later agreed to pay $79,000 in fines.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
At the time Anthony M. Kennedy was a lobbyist for Schenley Industries Inc., in Sacramento, the giant liquor producer allegedly was paying hundreds of thousands of dollars in illegal kickbacks to liquor distributors and restaurants in New York and California, records in those states show. The records give no indication that Kennedy, picked for the Supreme Court, played any role in the illicit schemes, for which Schenley later agreed to pay $79,000 in fines.
NEWS
November 14, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Proposed Supreme Court nominee Anthony M. Kennedy called a news conference here Friday and then refused to answer questions, saying he would make statements only to the Senate Judiciary Committee. The announcement dashed expectations that Kennedy might publicly confront questions about his work as a lobbyist for Schenley Industries Inc. in the 1960s and '70s and about his abrupt resignation last month from San Francisco's all-white, all-male Olympic Club.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1988 | Associated Press
It has become known simply as "the Guinness affair." But it is a complex and far-reaching case of alleged stock manipulation by the huge brewer Guinness PLC in its $4.7-billion bid to acquire Distillers Co., a gin and Scotch whiskey maker. The case has already had a major impact on the City, London's financial district, and when it comes before the Old Bailey criminal court, possibly this fall, it may become what the Observer newspaper called the "financial trial of the century."
NEWS
December 17, 1987 | DOUGLAS JEHL and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
A solidly supportive Senate Judiciary Committee wound up confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Anthony M. Kennedy a day early Wednesday, after lingering acrimony over Robert H. Bork's defeated nomination re-emerged to overshadow largely uncontroversial testimony about Kennedy.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1987 | Associated Press
Guinness PLC, the British brewing giant, is feeling the heat of being the first major target of a securities investigation by the government since Britain deregulated its financial markets. The first victim of the probe might be Guinness Chairman Ernest Saunders, who is under increasing pressure to resign as shareholders have watched the company's stock price tumble--despite Guinness' growing profitability.
NEWS
November 10, 1987 | DAVID LAUTER and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan and Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III met Monday with two key Republican senators to try to gauge the depth of hard-line conservatives' reservations about Anthony M. Kennedy, the California federal judge who is the leading candidate for the vacant seat on the Supreme Court. Two days after nominee Douglas H.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | WILLIAM OVEREND and LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writers
Anthony M. Kennedy--described as a "straight arrow" and "almost prissy" by other members of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals--astonished a group of Sacramento law students recently by giving a lecture in a powdered wig and three-cornered hat. Kennedy, who teaches constitutional law at McGeorge School of Law, was observing the bicentennial of the U.S.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, in his third attempt to fill the vacant Supreme Court seat, said Wednesday that he will nominate federal appeals Judge Anthony M. Kennedy of Sacramento, whom he described as representing "the best traditions of America's judiciary." In a low-key ceremony, Reagan appeared conciliatory after four months of confrontation with the Senate over his previous two choices for the high court. "The experience of the past several months has made all of us a bit wiser," Reagan conceded.
NEWS
December 14, 1987 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
Anthony M. Kennedy, President Reagan's nominee to the Supreme Court, is a product of two different sides of his hometown here, where he has spent nearly all of his 51 years. One is the deeply rooted world of old Sacramento, where small clusters of upper-middle-income families have dwelt in the same neighborhoods for three generations.
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