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Schindler S List

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NEWS
February 9, 1994 | ROBIN ABCARIAN
Last week, after taking myself to the movie everyone's talking about, I drove home feeling outraged by the world's injustices and depressed because the human spirit seems eternally captive to its darker side. In the aftermath of "Schindler's List," I tossed around the notion of personal responsibility in areas large and small: What, I wondered, can one person do about Bosnia? About the semiautomatic gunfire we hear at night in our neighborhoods?
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013
With the Oscars finally upon us Sunday, it's do-or-die for the movies ranked in the L.A. Times Data Desk's HeatMeter, which tallies points at events throughout the season to gauge the overall traction of people and films. With Ben Affleck's "Argo" piling up the wins, it's taken the lead in the overall film race (which incorporates all wins for a movie, and for everyone from directors to actors to cinematographers). A best picture win could well cement "Argo's" place at the top of the heap.
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NEWS
April 22, 2004 | From Reuters
Filmmaker Steven Spielberg, who won his first Oscar for the Holocaust drama "Schindler's List," has taken on another tragic moment in modern Jewish history as his next project: the 1972 Munich Olympics. Spielberg plans to start production in June and is eyeing actor Ben Kingsley for a role in the drama, which will chronicle the Summer Games devastated by the kidnapping and slaying of Israeli athletes by Palestinian militants, a DreamWorks studio spokeswoman said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2013 | Elaine Woo
Among the 1,100 Jews saved from the Nazis by German industrialist Oskar Schindler was an emaciated 13-year-old boy named Leon Leyson, who had to stand on a box to reach the machinery in the Krakow factory where Schindler sheltered him and his family. The boy Schindler called "Little Leyson" survived the Holocaust to start life over in Los Angeles. He taught high school in Huntington Park for 39 years, rarely mentioning to anyone the pain and perils he experienced during the war that claimed the lives of 6 million Jews.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1994 | ROBBIE KINBERG, Robbie Kinberg, 18, is a recent graduate of Crossroads School in Santa Monica. He plans to attend Brown University in the fall. and
Believing Kenneth Turan ("Restraint From the Master of Razzmatazz," Calendar, Dec. 15) and all the other critics who have waxed poetic about Steven Spielberg's latest blockbuster, I attended "Schindler's List" with an open mind hoping that Spielberg had somehow managed to make a film divorced from the fairy-tale perceptions that had been emblematic of his earlier work.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The memories, Leon Leyson says, have not diminished with time. Memories--of German troops invading Poland in 1939 and his family being herded into the Jewish ghetto in Krakow when he was 9. . . . Of hiding in a cramped attic crawl space to avoid being killed or sent to a death camp by SS commandos who periodically swept through the Jewish quarter. . . . Of living in a concentration camp run by a sadistic SS commandant who would shoot Jews for sport. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1994 | KEVIN WESTON, Kevin Weston is assistant editor of YO! (Youth Outlook), a journal of San Francisco Bay Area teen life produced by Pacific News Service. This article was distributed by the news service. and
There is nothing more galling than hearing people laugh at an image or idea that you take very seriously. With each chuckle your head aches with anger and your eyes fill with tears. That is how some patrons at the Grand Lake Theater in Oakland felt when a group of high school students laughed through parts of Steven Spielberg's World War II Holocaust epic, "Schindler's List." Since then, everyone from CNN to Steven Spielberg has been speculating on what was behind that disturbing laughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1994 | JEFFREY K. WATANABE, Jeffrey K. Watanabe is a junior in the urban studies program at Loyola Marymount University. and
In response to the article "Did Cultures Clash Over 'Schindler's'?" (Calendar, Jan. 22), I found it appalling to read that about 20 kids in an Oakland movie theater laughed at a scene where a Nazi soldier shot a Jewish woman. It seems to me that these kids, like a lot of others, had no idea what the Holocaust was all about. I recall back in high school that our history classes did not spend much time on the Holocaust.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2012 | By J. Hoberman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The office pools have closed, let the drama begin: Silent film or 3-D talkie, Streep's Thatcher or Williams' Marilyn or maybe Viola Davis? Scorsese again? For me, the most fascinating question is which of the five foreign-film nominees will win. If you picked Asghar Farhadi's "A Separation" — a visceral chamber drama exposing all manner of class, religious and gender fissures in contemporary Iran — you went for the favorite, winner of numerous critics' awards, "a movie you'll love from a country you hate," as the late Bingham Ray jokingly promoted "The White Balloon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1994
"Schindler's List": The Times so far has received 150 letters on Rabbi Eli Hecht's Jan. 2 column criticizing the movie "Schindler's List"; 137 letters disagreed with Rabbi Hecht, while 13 supported his viewpoint.
OPINION
December 27, 2012
Re “ Moviegoing as endurance test ,” Dec. 22 I don't think longer movies have anything to do with digital. It's because longer movies traditionally win awards. About 40% of the movies that won the best picture Oscar over the last 40 years have been movies more than 21/2 hours in length. (“The Godfather,” The Godfather Part II,” “Dances With Wolves,” “Schindler's List,” “Braveheart,” “Titanic” and “Gladiator,” to name a few). Several films that were nominated but didn't win were longer movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2012 | By J. Hoberman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The office pools have closed, let the drama begin: Silent film or 3-D talkie, Streep's Thatcher or Williams' Marilyn or maybe Viola Davis? Scorsese again? For me, the most fascinating question is which of the five foreign-film nominees will win. If you picked Asghar Farhadi's "A Separation" — a visceral chamber drama exposing all manner of class, religious and gender fissures in contemporary Iran — you went for the favorite, winner of numerous critics' awards, "a movie you'll love from a country you hate," as the late Bingham Ray jokingly promoted "The White Balloon.
TRAVEL
November 5, 2010 | By Tim Richards, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As I stood on a cracked concrete sidewalk in the Podgorze district of Krakow, I began to understand just what "wrong side of the tracks" meant. Ahead of me was a stark railroad bridge that carried commuters across the Vistula River to the city's historic heart. Beneath it was a pedestrian walkway, claustrophobically low and forbidding. Punctuating the end of the street, it seemed like a grim gateway of sorts, and so it was. Beyond the bridge, past a collection of featureless industrial buildings in various states of repair, was Krakow's newest attraction ?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2005 | From Associated Press
Poland's supreme court upheld the conviction on bribery charges of Lew Rywin, the Polish co-producer of the Oscar-winning film "Schindler's List." Rywin, 59, was convicted last year of being an accessory to influence peddling. He was found guilty by a Warsaw court of trying to solicit a $17.5-million bribe from a leading newspaper, Gazeta Wyborcza, in 2002. He has been sentenced to two years in prison and ordered to pay $30,000 in fines.
NEWS
April 22, 2004 | From Reuters
Filmmaker Steven Spielberg, who won his first Oscar for the Holocaust drama "Schindler's List," has taken on another tragic moment in modern Jewish history as his next project: the 1972 Munich Olympics. Spielberg plans to start production in June and is eyeing actor Ben Kingsley for a role in the drama, which will chronicle the Summer Games devastated by the kidnapping and slaying of Israeli athletes by Palestinian militants, a DreamWorks studio spokeswoman said Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2004
After Kenneth Turan's moving comments on Ken Kesey's undeserved neglect at the March 1976 Oscars, he segues so smoothly into chiding Oscar winner Charlize Theron's failure this year to thank Aileen Wuornos for her crucial contribution that it just about takes your breath away. There may have been similar lapses in the past. I saw "Schindler's List," and if the Oscar recipients said one word of appreciation for the Nazis I sure didn't hear it. The lesson to be learned is obvious: I'd like to thank my late parents, my wife and kids, the pizza delivery man, and the stalwart crew that does my yard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1994 | JEFF BEAN
Thomas Keneally, the author of "Schindler's List," will speak today at Saddleback College. The noon event, in Room 225 of the Student Services Center, is free and open to the public. The campus is at 28000 Marguerite Parkway. Keneally is scheduled to talk about his book, the theme of discrimination in literature and the pitfalls and joys of transforming a book into a movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2001
Some of the people involved in making the movie "Beloved" are crying foul that NBC is editing the film for content for its network premiere ("A Toned-Down 'Beloved,'" Dec. 22). Actress Lisa Gay Hamilton suggests racism is afoot, pointing out that neither "Schindler's List" nor "Saving Private Ryan" was edited for network TV. To compare "Beloved" to those two great films is outrageous. "Schindler's List" and "Saving Private Ryan" are American classics. The public, even the many fans of the book on which it's based, stayed away from "Beloved" in droves.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2004 | From Reuters
French schools should show films such as "Schindler's List" or "The Pianist" to combat a dramatic rise in racism and anti-Semitism among students, said France's education minister, Luc Ferry. Novels, documentary films and visits to former Nazi concentration camps also would help invigorate civics classes meant to teach tolerance and understanding, he said this week while presenting a new guide to materials against racial hatred.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2001
Some of the people involved in making the movie "Beloved" are crying foul that NBC is editing the film for content for its network premiere ("A Toned-Down 'Beloved,'" Dec. 22). Actress Lisa Gay Hamilton suggests racism is afoot, pointing out that neither "Schindler's List" nor "Saving Private Ryan" was edited for network TV. To compare "Beloved" to those two great films is outrageous. "Schindler's List" and "Saving Private Ryan" are American classics. The public, even the many fans of the book on which it's based, stayed away from "Beloved" in droves.
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