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Schizophrenia

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1992
Your article "Baby's Growth May Warn of Schizophrenia" (March 15) was excellent. It was factual, pertinent, well-written and supportive to the search for clues of schizophrenia. Our son who was diagnosed with schizoaffective-schizophrenia brain disease has been an enigma. He led a basically normal life until age 21. There was no family history . . . only a series of events similar to that described by Thomas H. Maugh II in his well-written article. KATHY SMITH-BROOKS, Carlsbad
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | Steve Lopez
Howard Askins grew up in New York, the son of blue-collar transit authority employees who expected him to go far, and he did. His first stop was Brown University, and then he was off to Harvard, where he earned both medical and law degrees before moving on to psychiatric residency at UCLA. Nathaniel Ayers, like Askins, grew up working class - in his case, Cleveland was home. His dream was music, not medicine, and his hard work landed him at the prestigious Juilliard School for the Performing Arts in New York City, where he played for a time in the same orchestra as Yo-Yo Ma. On Monday, the two African American men sat across from each other in a former pickle factory on San Fernando Road that serves as the mental health division of Los Angeles County Superior Court.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2009 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
So rare is the child form of schizophrenia, it has taken researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health 18 years to diagnosis and collect data on 110 children. "We are trying to understand schizophrenia in a comprehensive way," says Dr. Nitin Gogtay, a researcher involved with the project in Bethesda, Md. "We see the illness in a very pure form. At that age, there are no confounding factors, like alcohol or drug abuse. We feel a lot of answers will come out of this study."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Amanda Bynes has been popping up recently on social media looking pretty good, and now her lawyer is speaking out to deny a mental-health rumor reported during her struggles last year.  "For the record, Amanda does not have schizophrenia, nor has she ever been diagnosed with it," the actress-turned-fashion student's lawyer told People on Wednesday. Bynes was hospitalized on a 72-hour psychiatric hold last summer after setting a small fire in the driveway of a Thousand Oaks home, then stayed in treatment for months afterward.
HEALTH
November 21, 2011 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
The premise Curtis (Michael Shannon) is an Ohio construction worker whose mother, Sarah (Kathy Baker), is a paranoid schizophrenic who had to leave the family when Curtis was still a child. Now Curtis begins to develop a series of nightmares about a pending storm (often multiple tornadoes), his dog attacking him and being a victim of a serious car accident. On several occasions, the sensations of the dreams carry over to his daytime life. He sees a therapist. Though Curtis is concerned about his family history, he tells the therapist he thinks he may just be suffering from a brief psychosis, since, despite his nightmares, delusions and visual and auditory hallucinations, he lacks the disorganized speech, behavior and other negative symptoms that also characterize schizophrenia.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Amanda Bynes has been popping up recently on social media looking pretty good, and now her lawyer is speaking out to deny a mental-health rumor reported during her struggles last year.  "For the record, Amanda does not have schizophrenia, nor has she ever been diagnosed with it," the actress-turned-fashion student's lawyer told People on Wednesday. Bynes was hospitalized on a 72-hour psychiatric hold last summer after setting a small fire in the driveway of a Thousand Oaks home, then stayed in treatment for months afterward.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2008
In her review of Beyonce's split-personality tendencies on the "Sasha Fierce" album ["Beyonce Tries to Have It Both Ways," Nov. 13], Ann Powers criticizes the singer for accepting an outdated notion of what is "real" for a woman. She then makes a thoughtless remark about Beyonce and T.I. as being the only hip-hop stars "who recently tried this schizophrenia thing." Wow. Powers might be in touch with real women's issues, but she obviously knows nothing about the real issues of people who suffer from schizophrenia.
SCIENCE
March 24, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The key to schizophrenia may be found in a gene region thought to play a role in inflammation and autoimmune disorders, U.S. researchers said Tuesday in the journal Molecular Psychiatry. If confirmed, the finding could lead to a test and possibly new treatments for the mental disorder that affects about 1% of the world's population, researchers said. The link to inflammation might help explain why many patients with schizophrenia have autoimmune diseases.
HEALTH
February 26, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Scientists have identified genetic mutations that may predispose people to schizophrenia, a brain disorder with symptoms including delusions. The genes normally affect a signaling system in the brain involving a protein called calcineurin, which plays a role in memory and higher brain functions. "The proteins these genes produce provide us with targets for developing new drugs," said Jeffrey Lieberman, the chairman of psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.
NEWS
October 1, 1991
It's delusional to think that projects such as HOMES provide anything more than a Band-Aid approach to mental illness. Pat, who "spends most of her days in bed," is only a step away from the streets to where the mentally ill were released in the '70s. The dream of adequate community-based services has not been realized. It's ironic that the only help forthcoming for Pat is freeway-close, but possibly light years away, at UC Irvine medical research. If there is to be a public outcry against such injustice, it will not come from The Times sensationalizing the symptoms of schizophrenia, which read no better than the old college textbooks.
OPINION
January 7, 2014
Re "Have you seen my brother standing in the shadows?," Opinion, Jan. 5 Sarah Dusseault's story about her brother' struggle with mental illness and homelessness was heartbreakingly familiar. My sister with schizophrenia has been repeatedly homeless, jailed and hospitalized. We were fortunate, though, to have guardianship and conservatorship awarded in New Mexico. There is no guarantee of stability, but we have some leverage to help her. Simply from a state expense view, keeping our mentally ill out of jails and hospitals saves money.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Johnson & Johnson will pay more than $2.2 billion in criminal and civil fines for marketing drugs Risperdal, Invega and Natrecor for uses they weren't approved for, the U.S. Justice Department announced Monday. The settlement, one the largest settlements of its kind, also covers charges that the company paid kickbacks to doctors and pharmacies promoting the drugs, the Justice Department said.  “The conduct at issue in this case jeopardized the health and safety of patients and damaged the public trust,” said Atty.
SCIENCE
July 1, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
If you are conscious and making sense of the world, you have your dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to thank. Same, if you can remember a string of numbers long enough to walk into the next room and punch them into a telephone keypad. To visualize a goal and then accomplish it -- say, fitting a bulky piece of furniture into your car -- you're likewise going to need that part of the frontal lobe to be in good working order. But look under the hood of that marvelous piece of gray matter, as a group of Yale University neuroscientists recently did in "cognitively engaged monkeys," and you will see the workhorses of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2013 | By Joseph Serna, Lauren Williams and Kate Mather
The contents of a long, rambling essay written by a Costa Mesa man who likely blew himself up in an apparent suicide are concerning police, authorities said Monday. The 17,000-word essay, titled “The Pricker: A True Story of Assassination, Terrorism and High Treason,” includes references to aliens, the  O.J. Simpson  trial, the U.S. government and “the pricker,” which the author describes as “an assassin's weapon that deposits biological agents into a victim's skin, on contact, without their knowledge.” Though its author, 52-year-old Kevin Harris, apparently killed himself Sunday evening, elements of it are still of concern, said Lt. Jerry Hildeman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2013 | By Joe Serna
A Costa Mesa man who police believe blew himself up inside his home wrote extensively about his fear of government. He wrote that the government was behind the killing of Nicole Brown Simpson and John Lennon, the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and the death of Righteous Brothers singer Bobby Hatfield. The 17,000-word essay titled “The Pricker: A True Story of Assassination, Terrorism and High Treason” includes references to aliens, the O.J. Simpson trial, the U.S. government and “the pricker,” which it describes as “an assassin's weapon that deposits biological agents into a victim's skin, on contact, without their knowledge.” Although its author, 52-year-old Kevin Harris, apparently killed himself Sunday evening, elements of it are still of concern, Police Sgt. Jerry Hildeman said.
HEALTH
October 3, 2012 | Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
It's been a rough week. A few days ago, at UCLA's Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital, 6-year-old Jani toppled a food cart and was confined to her room. She slammed her head against the floor, opening a bloody cut that sent her into hysterics. Later, she kicked the hospital therapy dog. Jani normally likes animals. But most of her animal friends -- cats, rats, dogs and birds -- are phantoms that only she can see. January Schofield has schizophrenia. Potent psychiatric drugs -- in doses that would stagger most adults -- seem to skip off her. She is among the rarest of the rare: a child seemingly born mentally ill. She suffers from delusions, hallucinations and paroxysms of rage so severe that not even her parents feel safe.
HEALTH
September 13, 2012 | By Cassandra Willyard
Inside the human skull lies a 3-pound mystery. The brain - a command center composed of tens of billions of branching neurons - controls who we are, what we do and how we feel. "It's the most amazing information structure anybody has ever been able to imagine," says Dr. Walter Koroshetz, deputy director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke in Bethesda, Md. For centuries, the brain's inner workings remained largely unexplored. But all that is changing.
SCIENCE
August 23, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Scientists have pinpointed a likely source for many cases of autism and schizophrenia: Men who become fathers later in life pass on more brand-new genetic mutations to their offspring. The finding buttresses observations from population studies that rates of these disorders are more prevalent in children born to older fathers, sometimes by a factor of 2 or more, experts said. The research, published online Wednesday by the journal Nature, also should help correct an overemphasis on the riskiness of women giving birth at older ages, some researchers said.
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