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Schmaltz

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NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By Russ Parsons
My old friend Michael Ruhlman has come up with a terrific holiday gift not only for cookbook readers but for cookbook writers. Always out in front of the technological curve, Ruhlman and his photographer wife, Donna Turner Ruhlman, have just released a mini-cookbook for the iPad called “The Book of Schmaltz: A Love Song to a Forgotten Fat” (perfect timing, no? There are still four days of Hanukkah left). It's gorgeous. If for some reason you never thought frying chicken fat could be made beautiful, you really need to check this out. Especially on the iPad, the colors just glow.
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NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By Russ Parsons
My old friend Michael Ruhlman has come up with a terrific holiday gift not only for cookbook readers but for cookbook writers. Always out in front of the technological curve, Ruhlman and his photographer wife, Donna Turner Ruhlman, have just released a mini-cookbook for the iPad called “The Book of Schmaltz: A Love Song to a Forgotten Fat” (perfect timing, no? There are still four days of Hanukkah left). It's gorgeous. If for some reason you never thought frying chicken fat could be made beautiful, you really need to check this out. Especially on the iPad, the colors just glow.
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FOOD
May 5, 1994
I greatly enjoyed reading about a rarely remembered Jewish soul food in "Risky Gribbeness" by Dan Berger (April 28). My mother would also save the fat from her chickens in the freezer and periodically work her magic with an iron frying pan and a huge pile of chopped onions. Our family called the cracklings grieven , which would sit in a colander on the counter for several days until nibbled away. However, our primary motivation in preparing grieven was to obtain a jar of fragrant yellow schmaltz to keep in the refrigerator for sauteing, for sandwiches and for the preparation of the most moist and delicious mashed potatoes imaginable.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2011 | By Louise Lucas
"Onward: How Starbucks fought for Its Life Without Losing Its Soul" picks up where author-Chief Executive Howard Schultz's previous book, "Pour Your Heart Into It," left off. The latter is the story of the coffee chain that Schultz built from the early 1980s. "Onward" is the story of how Starbucks faced the demolition ball until Schultz returned as CEO in 2008, eight years after he had stepped down. It is a tale of derring-do, traversing the globe and crowded with a cast of exceptional people.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2001 | Ernesto Lechner
A long-haired singer dressed entirely in white holds a white guitar. Scantily clad cancan girls shake as if in a Playboy video. An orchestra adds syrupy cushions of strings to the love songs. And the singer, hand in hand with his wife, belts out a tune titled "The Ideal Couple." Sound like a bad Vegas show? Well, it certainly looked like one at times.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1986 | LEE MARGULIES, Times Staff Writer
It's no secret that television's Christmas stockings are mostly filled with schmaltz. As with perfume or wine, however, the quality gradations in sentiment can be sharp--as demonstrated Sunday by back-to-back yuletide movies on ABC. "The Christmas Star," airing at 7 p.m. (Channels 7, 3, 10 and 42), is by no means top-of-the-line holiday dramatic fare. For that you can watch "It's a Wonderful Life" Sunday (8 a.m. on Channel 7, 3 p.m. on Channel 5) or wait for the Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1985
"Dissonance Eventually Becomes Consonance." No, this line won't be found in Orwell's "Nineteen Eighty-Four," but in The Times' music review of a Santa Fe opera by Martin Bernheimer (" 'Tempest' in Sante Fe Premiere," July 30). The Times' curmudgeonly music critic has for years sneered at us benighted boobs who enjoy the "Schmaltz" of Beethoven, Verdi, Puccini, Johann Strauss, Jerome Kern, et al. We are inexcusably ignorant, in the Bernheimer view. WE are even stupid enough to be able to hum their tunes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2010
"Legendary" is a bold-faced name for a lowercase effort, a school wrestling drama so mired in family-film clichés it can never shake loose the suspicion that — not unlike certain high-gloss mat bouts — the emotional fix is in from the get-go. From a few scenes introducing an easily bullied, bespectacled high schooler named Cal ( Devon Graye), his protective, widowed mother Sharon ( Patricia Clarkson), Cal's estranged, troubled ex-wrestler brother Mike (wrestling star John Cena)
NEWS
May 22, 1999 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The call came on the eve of his Los Angeles concert, just as he was leaving his home in Mexico. We have your son. Follow our instructions. Don't make trouble. It was a year ago, and Vicente Fernandez was about to headline four sold-out shows at the Pico Rivera Sports Arena, his annual Memorial Day pilgrimage to the Eastside suburbs of L.A. Now this voice, saying his 33-year-old son, his namesake, was being held for a ransom of millions.
NEWS
February 26, 1998 | RANDY LEWIS
Voters didn't find the right recipient in every country category, but by and large they found honorable ones. The notable exception was the best song award to Bob Carlisle and Randy Thomas' saccharine "Butterfly Kisses," 1997's answer to "Old Shep." That schmaltz vote, however, was balanced by the best album award for Johnny Cash's raw, soul-searching "Unchained."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2010
"Legendary" is a bold-faced name for a lowercase effort, a school wrestling drama so mired in family-film clichés it can never shake loose the suspicion that — not unlike certain high-gloss mat bouts — the emotional fix is in from the get-go. From a few scenes introducing an easily bullied, bespectacled high schooler named Cal ( Devon Graye), his protective, widowed mother Sharon ( Patricia Clarkson), Cal's estranged, troubled ex-wrestler brother Mike (wrestling star John Cena)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2008 | Jon Caramanica, Special to The Times
Everything you know about fame is wrong: such is the lesson imparted by "Dancing With the Stars," the improbable ABC success story that began its sixth season last week. In this universe, B- and C-listers are elevated to water cooler chat fodder -- who knew there were pleasures to be found in Stacy Keibler, the leggy World Wrestling Entertainment diva, nailing the finer points of the samba? -- and professional ballroom dancers are granted access to Los Angeles' hottest nightspots and tracked by TMZ. Maksim Chmerkovskiy's favorite dance?
WORLD
November 1, 2007 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
With the next election two years away, it's a little early to be wooing voters with love songs. So when President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono released a CD of schmaltzy pop tunes he had penned, including "My Longing for You" and "Dear, I Miss You Too," some Indonesians were left wondering, if only halfheartedly, what's up with their leader? The retired army general, it seems, has long been a closet composer. "The secret is taking a little time to reflect," Yudhoyono said at his recent album launch.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2004 | Adam Baer, Special to The Times
If the 22-year-old piano virtuoso Lang Lang ever gave up music, he might easily become a successful politician. He's all smiles, and these days he sports slick threads and side-swept bangs. A born crowd-pleaser, he appears doused in self-regard, content to keep other emotions off the stage. Musically, he sticks to a simple core approach and seems nearly evangelical about his responsibility to it. Few players pump both fists midway through an exciting work.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2001 | MARC WEINGARTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No body of music has been abused and debased more frequently than the Christmas canon. Holiday music has a built-in emotional charge and an easy familiarity, and that's a dangerous thing: There's plenty of room for interpretation without fear of alienation. That's the organizing principle behind the Trans-Siberian Orchestra, the most audaciously overblown experiment in musical tackiness since Lawrence Welk picked up his baton. Christmas is a cottage industry for the TSO.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2001 | Ernesto Lechner
A long-haired singer dressed entirely in white holds a white guitar. Scantily clad cancan girls shake as if in a Playboy video. An orchestra adds syrupy cushions of strings to the love songs. And the singer, hand in hand with his wife, belts out a tune titled "The Ideal Couple." Sound like a bad Vegas show? Well, it certainly looked like one at times.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2001 | MARC WEINGARTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No body of music has been abused and debased more frequently than the Christmas canon. Holiday music has a built-in emotional charge and an easy familiarity, and that's a dangerous thing: There's plenty of room for interpretation without fear of alienation. That's the organizing principle behind the Trans-Siberian Orchestra, the most audaciously overblown experiment in musical tackiness since Lawrence Welk picked up his baton. Christmas is a cottage industry for the TSO.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1995 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
"Amazing Grace" is amazing goo. On the one hand, this new NBC series' positive depiction of religion--through Patty Duke's newly ordained minister, Hannah Miller--is a healthy turnaround for a TV industry that gets spiritual for the most part only when praying for good ratings. On the other hand, rarely has sentiment seen so much schmaltz. Hannah is introduced tonight as a Rev. Fixit who wears her bleeding heart like a cross.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2001 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scene: Men grouped around a dying mother-to-be. "You've got to help her, doctor," says one to another. "I'm a PhD," he replies. First man, a moment later: "I think she's going into labor, doctor!" The PhD: "I need some hot water! I need some towels!" Cut to beaming PhD holding a swaddled infant: "It's a girl!" Anthropologist Hugo Archibald's trip to Africa has just culminated in the delivery of a chimpanzee baby, about to become a member of his family in the U.S.
NEWS
February 26, 1998 | RANDY LEWIS
Voters didn't find the right recipient in every country category, but by and large they found honorable ones. The notable exception was the best song award to Bob Carlisle and Randy Thomas' saccharine "Butterfly Kisses," 1997's answer to "Old Shep." That schmaltz vote, however, was balanced by the best album award for Johnny Cash's raw, soul-searching "Unchained."
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