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NEWS
April 13, 2001 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
It's one of the greatest stories ever told: A baby is found in a basket adrift in the Egyptian Nile and is adopted into the pharaoh's household. He grows up as Moses, rediscovers his roots and leads his enslaved Israelite brethren to freedom after God sends down 10 plagues against Egypt and parts the Red Sea to allow them to escape. They wander for 40 years in the wilderness and, under the leadership of Joshua, conquer the land of Canaan to enter their promised land.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2010 | By Susan King
Jesse James and Billy the Kid were the rock stars of the wild, wild West. James, who was born in 1847 and died in 1882, was an outlaw, gang leader, bank and train robber from Missouri who was the most infamous member of the James-Younger Gang. Mythologized even while he was alive, his celebrity grew after his death in dime novels where he was portrayed as a sagebrush Robin Hood. Billy the Kid, a.k.a. William H. Bonney, who was born in 1859 and died at 21 in 1881, was a outlaw and gunman who claimed that he killed more than 20 men (in reality, historians believe he probably shot only four -- but he was just starting out)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1995 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tonight, four days after the 50th anniversary of Anne Frank's death--memorialized around the world last week by public readings of her eloquent diaries--South Coast Repertory weighs in with its own Holocaust commentary: a NewSCRipts presentation of Peter Sagal's "Denial." The Harvard-educated writer, 30, believes that the SCR Mainstage reading of his new play could not come at a better time or in a more appropriate place.
BOOKS
November 24, 1985 | RICHARD EDER
"World's Fair" is E. L. Doctorow's portrait of the artist as a young child. The author's alter-ego, Edgar Altschuler, grows into an awareness that the world stretches far beyond the protective confines of a Bronx Jewish household. It was a quieter passage than Stephen Daedalus' vehement breakout from a constricted Dublin youth, and conducted with far greater cautiousness.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The sale price was $59.95, a bargain we could hardly believe. After bringing them home, I pulled two from their individual cardboard boxes, set them up and admired them. They were beautiful, and they were ours. I ran my hand across the wood, feeling the slick finish while experiencing the pride of ownership. We sat down in front of them. "A little high," I said. "A little heavy," my wife said. "We'll get used to them," I said. "Will we really?" she asked, unsurely.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Brent Kroeger pores over nasty online comments about stay-at-home dads, wondering if his friends think those things about him. The Rowland Heights father remembers high school classmates laughing when he said he wanted to be a "house husband. " He avoids mentioning it on Facebook. "I don't want other men to look at me like less of a man," Kroeger said. His fears are tied to a bigger phenomenon: The gender revolution has been lopsided. Even as American society has seen sweeping transformations - expanding roles for women, surging tolerance for homosexuality - popular ideas about masculinity seem to have stagnated.
NEWS
December 24, 2000 | MAURA DOLAN and MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Only rarely does a judge in a criminal case overturn the verdict reached by jurors in her own courtroom. Still rarer is the judge who admits to committing an error so serious it taints a verdict. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Jacqueline Connor did both Friday night in an extraordinary ruling that overturned the convictions of three Rampart Division police officers, impressing legal scholars with both her tightly reasoned legal arguments and her unusual candor.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2010 | David Lazarus
Glendale resident Lee Lanselle ate breakfast the other day at the Hill Street Cafe in La CaƱada Flintridge. As he waited for his credit card receipt, he worked out the tip in his head. The receipt arrived and Lanselle was surprised that his estimate of a 15% tip was less than the "suggested gratuity" printed on the form. A closer look revealed that the recommended tip on the receipt included the full amount of the meal, including taxes. "This isn't the first time I've seen something like this," Lanselle, 56, told me. "More and more I see 'gratuity guidelines' or 'suggested gratuity' on the receipt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1999 | DIANE WEDNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Natalia Moskvitina immigrated to the United States from Latvia nine years ago, the 19-year-old arrived with a few belongings and dreams of a better life. Her goals did not include continuing her education. But nearly a decade later, the mother of two, now 28, has completed a rigorous, full-time course of study at Glendale Community College in less than two years.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | MELISSA HEALY and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Republican critics of affirmative action hailed Monday's Supreme Court decision as a mandate for even more sweeping action by Congress and vowed to press home their attack on federal programs of racial preference.
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