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Scholastic Aptitude Test

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2003 | Stuart Silverstein, Times Staff Writer
Like many honor students with dreams of going to an Ivy League university, Burton Liao has been taking a test preparation course to boost his scores on college entrance exams. But unlike his classmates in the summer program, Liao has plenty of time left to learn SAT vocabulary words and score-boosting strategies before the big test day arrives. He's only 13 years old.
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OPINION
June 1, 2012
High school students have long wanted the option of taking the SAT in the summer. That's when many of the tutoring programs for the high-stakes college test are given, so the information would be fresh in the students' minds. The timing also would allow them to study for the test when they have more leisure, rather than during the academic year. Now, finally, this August, the College Board will offer a summer administration of the test - but only at a $4,500 summer program being held on the campus of Amherst College in Massachusetts, giving some 50 students who are already heavily advantaged an additional leg up. This was a terrible decision by the College Board, owner of the SAT. It's worth remembering that when the SAT (which stood for Scholastic Aptitude Test at the time; now it's simply an acronym)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1994
Re "Retire the Scholastic Aptitude Test," Commentary, Dec. 4: I would like to thank Lee A. Coffin for publicly stating what I have felt all along, that standardized tests do not do a good job of measuring academic achievement in the classroom and that they are biased against poor and minority students. Why can't the College Board abandon the SAT altogether? Haven't the members of the College Board got anything better to do with their time than make the lives of high school juniors and seniors miserable?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stanley H. Kaplan, the founder and namesake of the nation's first test-preparation company, died of heart failure Sunday at his home in New York City. He was 90. Kaplan started a tutoring company in his parents' Brooklyn home in 1938. In 1946, a student asked him to help her prepare for what was then called the Scholastic Aptitude Test. "I was there at the right time with the proper educational approach," Kaplan told the New York Times in 1981. "I consider myself a poor man's private school."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1991 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's the kind of nightmare that only high school students can dream of: Imagine spending a Saturday morning taking a three-hour test that can determine college acceptance, then finding out that the scores are no good because of a printing error. The nightmare became reality for nearly 1,000 California students this month after it was discovered that some Scholastic Aptitude Test booklets had questions that were printed twice.
NEWS
March 19, 1990 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The University of California, along with Asian-American educators and activists, are pressing the College Board to add Asian-language examinations to the tests that high school students may take to compete for college entrance. A student can get a leg up in college admissions by doing well on achievement tests in French, Spanish, German, Italian, Latin or Hebrew proficiency achievement exams, even if the language is his native tongue.
SPORTS
June 27, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A former Crenshaw High basketball star, Kevin Ollie, is eligible to play for Connecticut next season because he scored better than 700 on the Scholastic Aptitude Test he took on June 1, Connecticut assistant coach David Leitao said.
NEWS
September 29, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Trustees of the College Board, hoping to make the Scholastic Aptitude Test less coachable and more relevant to classroom learning, voted to postpone for a month a decision on whether to adopt sweeping changes in the test.
NEWS
September 23, 1991 | Kristina Lindgren
MOVE OVER, EINSTEIN: UCI's freshman class promises to be the best yet academically, with a mean high school grade point average of 3.66. "We think the faculty will be very pleased," Admissions Director James Dunning says. The average Scholastic Aptitude Test score was 1,032 out of a possible 1,600. Not bad, but UCI officials say the average of 461 on the test's verbal portion was "artificially" low, because English is not the first language of many new freshmen.
SPORTS
January 21, 1989
Georgetown Coach John Thompson and some local high school coaches indicate that the Scholastic Aptitude Test is discriminatory. As a black parent who has spent a lot of time in schools lately, I must agree with them. It discriminates against students who avoid reading, do as little homework and studying as possible and spend every free moment in non-academic pursuits. I applaud the NCAA for trying to improve the academic level of our athletes, surely it will help more than it will hurt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2008 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
Alex Schwertfeger doesn't know what college she wants to attend. But the Notre Dame High School junior is convinced that the key to entry at her dream school is the SAT. To boost her score, she attended a pricey private prep class and spent countless hours at home studying drills and completing practice tests. Before she went to bed many nights, she flipped through flashcards of the 200 most popular vocabulary words to appear on the test.
NATIONAL
August 25, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 4,400 students who received incorrect scores on their 2005 SAT exams could get a share of $2.85 million under a proposed settlement announced in St. Paul by parties in a federal class-action lawsuit. The payout by the not-for-profit College Board and scoring company NCS Pearson Inc. would give each wronged test-taker a minimum of $275. The settlement needs ratification by Judge Joan N. Ericksen during a hearing scheduled for Nov. 29.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2005 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Chris Scullin isn't so cocky as to think he plays a perfect guitar solo or has perfect form on the running track. But there was no denying those SAT scores: 800 points on math, 800 points on critical reading, 800 points on writing. A perfect 2400. "I was just staring at the screen, thinking, 'No, this can't be right,' " said Chris, 17, a Loyola High School junior from Beverly Hills who retrieved his scores from the Internet earlier this month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2005 | Stuart Silverstein and Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writers
As a new era of SAT scores dawned Monday, Carole Wampole was eager to learn her son's results on the recently revised college entrance exam. The Newport Coast businesswoman checked the website of the College Board, the owner of the SAT, through the night in hopes of getting an early peek at the scores. She succeeded shortly after 5 a.m. -- the time the College Board had announced it would post results -- but Wampole had few regrets about losing a night's sleep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2005 | Rebecca Trounson, Stuart Silverstein and Doug Smith, Times Staff Writers
The University of California admitted fewer students with low SAT scores to this year's freshman class than it did in 2003, following criticism that the university was accepting ill-prepared students in a back-door effort to boost enrollment of underrepresented minorities. Overall, UC campuses in 2004 admitted nearly 2,200 fewer applicants with scores of 1000 or below on the widely used college entrance exam, a drop of 26.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2003 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
In a pointed rebuke of one of their own, several University of California regents publicly chastised Board of Regents Chairman John J. Moores on Thursday for issuing a recent report critical of the university's admissions policies, saying it has harmed individual students and the university itself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1991
A big propaganda plug for the bilingual education Establishment ("Calexico Defies Odds on Dropout Rate," Part A, June 3): Kids learn better in Spanish. Rah! Rah! Among the glowing statistics you mention that 62% of the students entering high school are still not proficient in English. You neglected to mention that more than 95% of these students score below the national average on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). May I suggest that The Times also report on the schools with identical enrollments in south Texas.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
Nearly 1,000 California high school students will have to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test again because a printing error rendered their scores invalid, the New Jersey-based firm that distributes the tests said Thursday. The error was found on tests administered June 1, when more than 280,000 students nationwide took the examinations. It will affect about 8,400 students across the country, said Ray Nicosia, a spokesman for the Educational Testing Service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2003 | Stuart Silverstein, Times Staff Writer
SAT math scores for college-bound Californians and students across the country this year climbed to the highest levels in more than three decades and average verbal results were the best since the late 1980s, the College Board reported Tuesday. The overall improvement in California and nationally, however, masked a widening gap between the genders and among ethnic groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2003 | Stuart Silverstein, Times Staff Writer
Like many honor students with dreams of going to an Ivy League university, Burton Liao has been taking a test preparation course to boost his scores on college entrance exams. But unlike his classmates in the summer program, Liao has plenty of time left to learn SAT vocabulary words and score-boosting strategies before the big test day arrives. He's only 13 years old.
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