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Scholastic Assessment Test

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1995
The column (Dec. 4) by Lee Coffin of Connecticut College about the SAT contains several inaccuracies that I would like to correct. The name of the exam is Scholastic Assessment Test; it has not been called an "aptitude" test for nearly two years. All the changes in the new SAT were derived from findings that support the work of teachers and how students learn in today's classrooms. National professional teaching organizations helped advise the work done on the new SAT and the use of calculators was added at the behest of the mathematics community.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2008 | Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writer
The addition of a mandatory writing section to the SAT three years ago slightly improved the exam's ability to predict academic success for college freshmen, according to a report by the test's owner. The study, sponsored by the College Board, also found that scores from the new writing section were somewhat better at predicting grades in the first year of college than the other two SAT sections.
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NEWS
November 12, 1995 | Associated Press
Fraternal twins Courtney and Chris Salt- house got identical perfect scores on the SAT college admission test. The 17-year-old seniors at Chamblee High School took the Scholastic Assessment Test last month. "Coming out of it, I didn't think I did well," Chris said, noting that he had scored 1,550 on a previous SAT. Courtney said she was startled that she did as well as her brother. "I wasn't so surprised for my brother as I was for myself." Of 1.
NATIONAL
July 21, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Steps including better software and more training -- and even providing pencils and erasers at test centers -- could improve the reliability of scoring the SAT, a consultant's report says. The report, commissioned by the College Board, says the scoring system for the college entrance test has improved since more than 4,000 of the tests taken in October were given incorrectly low scores. On the whole, scores are reliable, it says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1997
If local high school students are traveling toward the Scholastic Assessment Test at a fixed speed of X, how can they reduce their anxiety before reaching the Oct. 4 test date? They might do so by enrolling in a 30-hour SAT preparation course beginning Monday, officials at Golden West College said. The seminars are designed to increase students' confidence and vocabulary, and to reduce anxiety by offering tips and test strategies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1995
Here are the district average scores on the Scholastic Assessment Test for 1995 graduating seniors in the 50 school districts in Los Angeles County. Scores can range from 200 to 800 in each of the test's two sections. Comparing districts based exclusively on averages is strongly discouraged by the testing agency because the percentage of students tested in each district can vary widely and skew the averages.
SPORTS
June 24, 1997 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Completing what has become a celebrated late-season signing period for UCLA, forward Schea Cotton, one of the nation's most renowned high school basketball players, learned Monday he has received a qualifying score on the Scholastic Assessment Test, making him eligible to play as a freshman next season. "I'm so excited to finally get this monkey off my back," said Cotton, who missed all of his senior season at Bellflower St. John Bosco because of injuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1995 | DOUGLAS ALGER
If the state Legislature isn't your first example of a brain trust, give Van Nuys' Stephen Friedman some time. The junior at Monroe High School in North Hills recently scored a perfect 1,600 on the Scholastic Assessment Test, the placement exam used by most colleges and universities across the country. He hasn't chosen a college yet, but already plans to major in political science.
SPORTS
November 20, 1995 | MARYANN HUDSON and STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The man who once held a school in his hands is now holding a cup of coffee. He has been holding it for an hour. Rarely does he take a sip. The anger James McAlister thought he left behind decades ago was merely tucked away. The familiar pain that once caused him to punch the steel doors of Pauley Pavilion is now causing him to weep again. This time as a father. Always as a Bruin.
SPORTS
August 16, 1995 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG and ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An arbitrator has ruled that the Educational Testing Service lacked substantial evidence when it invalidated the college entrance test score of USC football recruit Ken Haslip Jr. Haslip, a defensive back and wide receiver who sat out his freshman year without playing, reacted with delight after learning of the decision that ended a year-long ordeal. News of the ruling came as the Trojans prepared for their first day of football practice. Haslip plans to be there.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A high school senior whose SAT was incorrectly scored low is suing the board that oversees the exam and the testing company that was hired. The lawsuit, filed in Minnesota, is the first since last month's announcement that 4,411 students got incorrectly low scores and that more than 600 had better results than they deserved on the October test. It names the nonprofit College Board and the for-profit Pearson Educational Measurement, which has offices in Minnesota's Hennepin County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2005 | Jean Merl, Times Staff Writer
The nation's high school class of 2005 posted a record-high score on the math portion of the SAT, but displayed a lack of progress on the verbal part of the widely used college-entrance examination, test officials said Tuesday. As a whole, students who graduated this spring and were entering college this fall averaged 520 on the math portion and 508 on the verbal, on a scale from 200 to 800 possible points per section. The math was up two points from the year before and the verbal was the same.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2005 | Stuart Silverstein, Times Staff Writer
For generations of college-bound teenagers, nailing a 1600 on the SAT has been as good as it gets, equivalent in American popular culture to pitching a perfect game or bowling a 300. But no longer. Starting Monday, the venerable college entrance exam will sport a new scoring format and frame of reference. With the recent addition to the SAT of a third section that includes a handwritten essay, 2400 is becoming the new 1600.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2005 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
Writing, Audrianna Galvin says forthrightly, has never been her strong suit. So the teenager was more than a little anxious when makers of the SAT college entrance exam announced in 2002 that a revised version of the test would, for the first time, include a handwritten essay. "The whole idea of the writing section just really freaked me out," said Audrianna, 16, a junior at the private Buckley School in Sherman Oaks. "I thought, 'How on earth could I do that?'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2003 | Erika Hayasaki, Times Staff Writer
To California parents, the high-stakes test scores released this week will provide a complicated answer to a simple question. "Is my child getting a good education?" asked Carolyn Leserman, whose three children attend Manhattan Beach Unified schools. "As a parent, I look most closely at my children's scores. I read them. I pay attention to them." However, many parents like Leserman complain -- and state officials concede -- that the scores are difficult to understand.
NEWS
August 16, 2003
Orange County Report Card In California, about 4.5 million public school students in grades 2 through 11 took tests last spring tied to the state's academic standards in English/language arts, math, science and history/social science. For the first time, students also took the California Achievement Test/Sixth Edition, known as the CAT/6. That compared students against a national sample in reading, language skills, math, spelling and science.
NEWS
August 16, 2003
L.A. County and Inland Empire Report Card In California, about 4.5 million public school students in grades 2 through 11 took tests last spring tied to the state's academic standards in English/language arts, math, science and history/social science. For the first time, students also took the California Achievement Test/Sixth Edition, known as the CAT/6. That compared students against a national sample in reading, language skills, math, spelling and science.
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