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Scholastic Assessment Tests

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November 16, 1995 | JIM HODGES
Jason Allen of Jefferson High carries a 3.67 grade-point average and has scored 1,010 on his Scholastic Assessment Tests. He leads the Democrats' defense from his safety position with 98 tackles, six sacks, four fumble recoveries and two interceptions. He also plays tight end and has caught two touchdown passes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Van Nuys High leading the way, San Fernando Valley schools posted some of the top scores in Los Angeles on the 1998-99 Scholastic Assessment Test, according to statistics released late Tuesday. Van Nuys boasted the highest SAT scores in the Los Angeles Unified School District, averaging 537 on the verbal portion and 568 in math; El Camino Real High in Woodland Hills and the Sherman Oaks Center for Enriched Studies also posted results surpassing the national and state averages.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Van Nuys High leading the way, San Fernando Valley schools posted some of the top scores in Los Angeles on the 1998-99 Scholastic Assessment Test, according to statistics released late Tuesday. Van Nuys boasted the highest SAT scores in the Los Angeles Unified School District, averaging 537 on the verbal portion and 568 in math; El Camino Real High in Woodland Hills and the Sherman Oaks Center for Enriched Studies also posted results surpassing the national and state averages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Angel Iglesias leaned his head against a wall of the cramped, sweaty classroom in the Shalimar Learning Center, groaning to himself as if he had just fallen for the most stupid joke ever told. The 18-year-old's mistake was a typical misstep on the SAT. He tried to use algebra to answer a question instead of using one of the famous "tricks" that help thousands of students raise their scores by hundreds of points.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Angel Iglesias leaned his head against a wall of the cramped, sweaty classroom in the Shalimar Learning Center, groaning to himself as if he had just fallen for the most stupid joke ever told. The 18-year-old's mistake was a typical misstep on the SAT. He tried to use algebra to answer a question instead of using one of the famous "tricks" that help thousands of students raise their scores by hundreds of points.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
After catching an error in the grading of SAT II subject tests taken by 15,500 high school students in November, the College Board will notify colleges this week that most of those students' scores will drop an average of 20 points--and some by as much as 100 points. The announcement comes as most colleges are sending out letters of admission and rejection for next fall's freshman class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1995
The column (Dec. 4) by Lee Coffin of Connecticut College about the SAT contains several inaccuracies that I would like to correct. The name of the exam is Scholastic Assessment Test; it has not been called an "aptitude" test for nearly two years. All the changes in the new SAT were derived from findings that support the work of teachers and how students learn in today's classrooms. National professional teaching organizations helped advise the work done on the new SAT and the use of calculators was added at the behest of the mathematics community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1996
Project Medico, a program designed to increase the number of Latinos in the health-care field, was launched last weekend and will be held for the next two Saturdays at the University of Southern California. About 100 juniors from Bell, Huntington Park, Garfield and Roosevelt high schools are participating in the workshops, which include intensive training for taking the Scholastic Assessment Tests and panel discussions with Latino medical professionals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1998 | LISA FERNANDEZ
Students who get the jitters thinking about math equations and reading problems are invited to prepare for the Scholastic Assessment Tests in a Feb. 7 session sponsored by the Westlake High School Parent Teacher Student Assn. The PTSA is hosting a fund-raiser and SAT practice test for any student in Ventura County from 9 a.m. to noon at the high school. There is room for about 250 students. A follow-up session analyzing students' results will be held on Feb. 19 from 7 to 9 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI
Three more Ventura County high schools received their SAT scores this week, including Oxnard High, which registered a 35-point increase over last year. Each year thousands of college-bound students take the Scholastic Assessment Tests, which universities use as an entrance requirement and a predictor of academic success. Most county schools had their scores by Tuesday, but officials at Oxnard, Hueneme and Camarillo high schools did not receive theirs until Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
After catching an error in the grading of SAT II subject tests taken by 15,500 high school students in November, the College Board will notify colleges this week that most of those students' scores will drop an average of 20 points--and some by as much as 100 points. The announcement comes as most colleges are sending out letters of admission and rejection for next fall's freshman class.
SPORTS
November 16, 1995 | JIM HODGES
Jason Allen of Jefferson High carries a 3.67 grade-point average and has scored 1,010 on his Scholastic Assessment Tests. He leads the Democrats' defense from his safety position with 98 tackles, six sacks, four fumble recoveries and two interceptions. He also plays tight end and has caught two touchdown passes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1995
The column (Dec. 4) by Lee Coffin of Connecticut College about the SAT contains several inaccuracies that I would like to correct. The name of the exam is Scholastic Assessment Test; it has not been called an "aptitude" test for nearly two years. All the changes in the new SAT were derived from findings that support the work of teachers and how students learn in today's classrooms. National professional teaching organizations helped advise the work done on the new SAT and the use of calculators was added at the behest of the mathematics community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1996
Just as physicians tell us that the patient's attitude plays a major role in healing, school people know that parent involvement is the singularly most important contributor to a child's success in school. No, we're not saying that every parent must give time in the classroom. We are stating emphatically that children who succeed in school are from families that take a sincere interest in how and what the children are doing in class, and express that interest daily. "Report card" time can be a traumatic experience for all of us, particularly if that progress report shows little or no achievement.
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