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BUSINESS
March 27, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Scholastic Corp., publisher of the Harry Potter series of children's books, said it decided against buying the inventory of bankrupt EToys Inc. New York-based Scholastic had said it won an auction for the Santa Monica Internet retailer's inventory with an offer of 30 cents on the dollar, or about $8 million. The news sent Scholastic's shares plunging $5.19, or 13%, to close at $35.13 on Nasdaq.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2009 | Associated Press
Marlene Perez's "Dead Is the New Black" is a young adult novel with a noirish pink and black cover and a supernatural plot. If it ever becomes the next sensation, give some credit to middle-schoolers such as Geneva Lish. "It has an unusual plot and a unique power," says Lish, a seventh-grader. Lish didn't buy the book online or at a store. She was among the students at J.H.S.
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BUSINESS
June 22, 2005
* Sony Corp. shareholders formally approved Howard Stringer as the company's new chief executive, making him the first non-Japanese executive to head the electronics and entertainment giant. * Scholastic Corp., U.S. publisher of the "Harry Potter" books, agreed to pay $710,000 to settle federal allegations that it marketed book clubs without giving full information about how the clubs operate.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2005
* Sony Corp. shareholders formally approved Howard Stringer as the company's new chief executive, making him the first non-Japanese executive to head the electronics and entertainment giant. * Scholastic Corp., U.S. publisher of the "Harry Potter" books, agreed to pay $710,000 to settle federal allegations that it marketed book clubs without giving full information about how the clubs operate.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2001
Scholastic Corp., the U.S. publisher of the Harry Potter children's books, will cut about 100 editorial jobs and take a fiscal fourth-quarter charge after ending development of its literacy textbook series. The job cuts represent about 1% of the New York-based company's work force. A charge of $1.05 to $1.15 a share will be taken in the quarter ending May 31 as a result. * Guide to Our Staff: Need to reach Business section reporters or editors?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Scholastic Corp., the U.S. publisher of the Harry Potter books, agreed to pay $9.65 million for the rights to the "Goosebumps" series, ending years of litigation with author R.L. Stine and Parachute Press Inc. Scholastic's 1999 lawsuit claimed that "Goosebumps" owner Parachute was using ghostwriters on some books. Parachute in turn accused Scholastic of not making payments and selling some books without permission.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Scholastic Corp., the U.S. publisher of the Harry Potter series of children's books, agreed to buy publisher and children's book-club operator Grolier Inc. from France's Lagardere for $400 million in cash. Danbury, Conn.-based Grolier, with $450 million in 1999 revenue, is the top seller of children's books and reference books to school libraries. Its Internet site sells books primarily for children under 5. New York-based Scholastic sells primarily to children ages 6 to 12.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2009 | Associated Press
Marlene Perez's "Dead Is the New Black" is a young adult novel with a noirish pink and black cover and a supernatural plot. If it ever becomes the next sensation, give some credit to middle-schoolers such as Geneva Lish. "It has an unusual plot and a unique power," says Lish, a seventh-grader. Lish didn't buy the book online or at a store. She was among the students at J.H.S.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2000 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harry Potter won't hit store shelves until Saturday but the youthful wizard is already working his magic on Wall Street. Shares of Scholastic Corp., Jakks Pacific Inc. and Enesco Group Inc. have risen as sharply as the hype surrounding the release of the fourth book about an orphan who attends a school for witches and wizards, "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire." All have a piece of the Potter franchise. Scholastic, the U.S. publisher of the series by British author J.K.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2004 | From Times wire services
No word yet on when the next Harry Potter book comes out, but at least there's a title: "Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince." Author J.K. Rowling revealed the title on her website. Judy Corman, a spokeswoman for her U.S. publisher, Scholastic Corp., confirmed the title Tuesday. Rowling said that she decided to reveal the title after a hoax title was circulated via the Internet.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Scholastic Corp., the U.S. publisher of the Harry Potter books, agreed to pay $9.65 million for the rights to the "Goosebumps" series, ending years of litigation with author R.L. Stine and Parachute Press Inc. Scholastic's 1999 lawsuit claimed that "Goosebumps" owner Parachute was using ghostwriters on some books. Parachute in turn accused Scholastic of not making payments and selling some books without permission.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2001
Scholastic Corp., the U.S. publisher of the Harry Potter children's books, will cut about 100 editorial jobs and take a fiscal fourth-quarter charge after ending development of its literacy textbook series. The job cuts represent about 1% of the New York-based company's work force. A charge of $1.05 to $1.15 a share will be taken in the quarter ending May 31 as a result. * Guide to Our Staff: Need to reach Business section reporters or editors?
BUSINESS
March 27, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Scholastic Corp., publisher of the Harry Potter series of children's books, said it decided against buying the inventory of bankrupt EToys Inc. New York-based Scholastic had said it won an auction for the Santa Monica Internet retailer's inventory with an offer of 30 cents on the dollar, or about $8 million. The news sent Scholastic's shares plunging $5.19, or 13%, to close at $35.13 on Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2000 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harry Potter won't hit store shelves until Saturday but the youthful wizard is already working his magic on Wall Street. Shares of Scholastic Corp., Jakks Pacific Inc. and Enesco Group Inc. have risen as sharply as the hype surrounding the release of the fourth book about an orphan who attends a school for witches and wizards, "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire." All have a piece of the Potter franchise. Scholastic, the U.S. publisher of the series by British author J.K.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Scholastic Corp., the U.S. publisher of the Harry Potter series of children's books, agreed to buy publisher and children's book-club operator Grolier Inc. from France's Lagardere for $400 million in cash. Danbury, Conn.-based Grolier, with $450 million in 1999 revenue, is the top seller of children's books and reference books to school libraries. Its Internet site sells books primarily for children under 5. New York-based Scholastic sells primarily to children ages 6 to 12.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2006
Separation: Two-time Oscar winner Hilary Swank and actor husband Chad Lowe have separated after more than eight years of marriage, Swank's manager confirmed Monday. Publishing: Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.) and children's publisher Scholastic Corp. will issue an illustrated book about a typical day in his life as told by Splash, his Portuguese water dog. Kennedy's proceeds from the 56-page book, due out in May, will go to charity.
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